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Sharpening Bench Chisels

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Forum topic by JPrictoe posted 08-04-2017 01:47 PM 749 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JPrictoe

1 post in 170 days


08-04-2017 01:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sharpening chisel whetstone

First timer. I bought a whetstone (1000/4000) to put an initial grind on a very cheap chisel from the big orange box. It did not go very well. Flattening the back is pretty intuitive, but when shaping the bevel, I burrowed a trough in the stone that I now realize I need a flattening stone to maintain and even out.

My question is: Should I buy a flattening plate and continue to buy whetstones? Or is there a more cost effective way to sharpen chisels (money is a priority)?


12 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8026 posts in 2411 days


#1 posted 08-04-2017 01:50 PM

Atoma diamond plates will save you time and money.

Welcome to Lumberjocks JPrictoe

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

956 posts in 425 days


#2 posted 08-04-2017 01:59 PM

you can start with a set of sandpapers and a flat hard surface, like a piece of glass or a stone tile from the same orange store you bought you chisel from. Often it all you need, If with time you feel you overgrown it you will have a better idea what you need,

View JayT's profile

JayT

5453 posts in 2045 days


#3 posted 08-04-2017 02:39 PM

You can flatten your stone with some coarse sandpaper on a flat surface instead of buying a flattening plate. That can be a piece of granite, a table saw top, a jointer bed or whatever else you have have that is reasonably flat. I’ve even heard of some people flattening stones on a concrete block.

Cost effective is relative. Sandpaper on a flat surface is the cheapest way to sharpen in the short term, but the costs add up quickly if you are doing much sharpening and it ends up being the most expensive system in the long run. Good quality diamond plates have the highest up front cost, but are generally the lowest cost over their life because they last so long. Oil stones and water stones fall somewhere in between. Which system is going to be best for you depends on a variety of factors, such as how often you sharpen, what kind of steel is used and what your work environment and flow looks like.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14839 posts in 2452 days


#4 posted 08-04-2017 02:49 PM

DMT diamond stones are effective.

JayT speaks truth, so does Carloz.

Moving to 1000/4000 for an ‘initial grind’ doesn’t sound right to me. Usually a less fine series of grits is followed. So you might be trying to do too much with you fine stones.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

367 posts in 1010 days


#5 posted 08-04-2017 02:49 PM

If money is a priority keep your current stones. As others have said, you can adhere sandpaper to a flat surface and flatten the stones on that. If you are digging into the stone when honing the bevel you can spend $15 on a cheap honing guide or apply pressure only on the pull and not on the push when honing. If you are new to sharpening, the honing guide may be a good bet.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View Vindex's profile

Vindex

76 posts in 656 days


#6 posted 08-04-2017 02:57 PM

I only have these two stones:
-DMT 11.5 coarse diamond stone
-King 1000/6000 combination stone

The DMT stone sets my bevels and flattens the waterstone. I use sandpaper attached to melamine with a spray adhesive if I need a coarser grit than the DMT has.

View Lemwise's profile

Lemwise

70 posts in 450 days


#7 posted 08-04-2017 07:16 PM



Atoma diamond plates will save you time and money.

Welcome to Lumberjocks JPrictoe

- waho6o9

Couldn’t agree more. I’ve switched to Atoma plates (600 and 1200) after years of using water stones and I’m never going back. They’re faster, they stay flat and if you use them the right way they should last you at least 10 years.

View Andre's profile (online now)

Andre

1488 posts in 1640 days


#8 posted 08-05-2017 06:32 AM

I hollow grind my blades, 1000 Water stone then right to 8000 for the polish. To touch up couple of passes over the 8000 stone or a flat hardwood block or even MDF with some green compound gives a new fresh edge quickly. Have found that with better quality blades(PMV-11) touch ups are very infrequent. Have never found a Diamond stone that could give the same polish? Have to watch as A1, O2 and PMV-11 blades all polish slightly different.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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harley090

1 post in 124 days


#9 posted 08-10-2017 04:54 AM

I think that buying a flattening plate is a good choice.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7653 posts in 2748 days


#10 posted 08-10-2017 10:11 AM

I posted this review some 4-1/2yr ago, and since then mine is still going strong. I can and do sharpen chisels, plane blades/cutters, and my lathe tools. This probably the cheapest “best” long term solution out there. The polishing wheel, when used with a 10,000 grit polishing stick easily brings up a mirror finish. Check it out below:

Harbor Freight 4×36 Belt Sander

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Bluenote38's profile

Bluenote38

219 posts in 222 days


#11 posted 08-10-2017 12:00 PM



I posted this review some 4-1/2yr ago, and since then mine is still going strong. I can and do sharpen chisels, plane blades/cutters, and my lathe tools. This probably the cheapest “best” long term solution out there. The polishing wheel, when used with a 10,000 grit polishing stick easily brings up a mirror finish. Check it out below:

Harbor Freight 4×36 Belt Sander

- HorizontalMike

What kind of belt are you using? Type and grit.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7653 posts in 2748 days


#12 posted 08-10-2017 05:09 PM

Oops, forgot the link to my review…

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/product/3110

180 grit is more than enough, and sharpens much finer than it would by hand. The spinning belt basically makes it act like a finer grit.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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