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Condensing a 22x22 shop to a 15x15

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Forum topic by Brian posted 08-03-2017 07:16 PM 734 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brian

16 posts in 149 days


08-03-2017 07:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop organize workshop storage downsize workspace

I’m having a hard time finding an effective layout for the shop I’m moving into. I was working out of my 2 car garage and our next house has a 15×15 shop in the back. The workspace I’m used to made it easy for each tool to have plenty of room to make a tool stationary. I have an 8×65 jointer, 20” planer, 6 foot table saw, 17” floor model band saw, floor drill press, and I’ll be building a miter saw station. All this and I still want have my assembly table, sanding machines, and lumber storage

I’m stubborn and probably a little maturity on my end is part of the solution to this problem. Quite frankly I want my own dedicated shop but I don’t want to lose workspace or pay to build one. Like I said, there’s a little maturity to be had on my part!

Here’s what I’d like to know.

What should I consider in terms of workflow when downgrading shop size? For those of you with smaller shops, did it help to use more of the vertical dimension; can you describe what you did? Should I eliminate tools? Should I consider more contemporary solutions such as flip-top carts/benches? Finally, can you give me some “absolutely dos” and “absolutely do nots”.

I am new on here and I look forward to the feedback, advice, and of course the banter and sarcasm. Cheers fellers!

-- Brian


24 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#1 posted 08-03-2017 07:26 PM

You’re likely have to make some hard choices
about the kind of work you’re going to do
in the future. I can’t see all that machinery
fitting into that space and still having room
to put stuff together.

One solution is to stop working in plywood
and jettison the table saw. The band saw
can do quite a range of work.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

748 posts in 335 days


#2 posted 08-04-2017 01:45 AM

I think you could consider selling the 20” planer, as painful as that might be, and replace it with one of the smaller machine out now like the DeWalt 735. you could store that machine under the wing of the chops when not in use and set it up on top of the TS when you need it.

Also, keep only the wood you need on hand if you must store it in the shop.

15’ is a difficult dimension to deal with for a shop- no way to rip a 4×8 sheet of plywood unless you can open a wide door. You could ditch the TS if you replace it with a track saw. Personally I’d have a hard time parting with my TS but might be your best option as Loren said. would clear up a lot of space.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

2969 posts in 552 days


#3 posted 08-04-2017 03:08 PM

I use my pick up truck to crosscut plywood with a straight edge and a mini saw horse this works better for me :<))
as far as cabinets go try use wall cabinets as much as possible keep the floor space for tools
and as TungOil mention try point Table saw heading in direction of wide door :<)) in my old shop I also used the window behind me for 16 foot boards
then for tools layout shop so you joint your board then right to rip it ..I also use my table saw as a workbench for 3 reasons nice and flat ,and kind of a huge surface ,plus I can clamp stuff right to wings lightly LOL :<))
here is pic of mine 12 X 24 :

HOPE THIS HELPS YOU

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

838 posts in 1476 days


#4 posted 08-04-2017 03:32 PM

Having just been through this exercise myself, I can tell you how I approached it.
I have the option of building a 12×18 shop in the backyard.
I am limited by set backs the city has in place.
I downloaded and familiarized myself with SketchUp.
I drew out the shop and tools I would be moving from the garage to the new shop.
I drew a 1’x1’ grid in SketchUp and placed it on the new shops floor so I could easily see how much room I would have between tools.

It was a real eye opener for me. My conclusion was that some of my stuff was going to have to stay in the garage. I was able to re-arrange things in multiple layouts to see all of the “what-if’s”. I did this for over a year.

BTW…I’m still in the garage! :)

-- Chem, Central California

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1835 days


#5 posted 08-04-2017 03:37 PM

Put everything except the miter saw station on wheels. Move it to a back wall when not in use. That’s how I do my 1 car garage area.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

2969 posts in 552 days


#6 posted 08-04-2017 03:40 PM



Put everything except the miter saw station on wheels. Move it to a back wall when not in use. That s how I do my 1 car garage area.

Brian

- bbasiaga


OH yeah please add this to my response LMAO :<)) +1 AND DITTO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#7 posted 08-04-2017 04:15 PM

I have a 30 x 40 dedicated tool shop at my home in Canada and a 12 x 14 shop at my winter place in Az.

Hard to believe but I can build just about anything there that I can at home.

My Az shop has three workbenches and lots of walking around room. The one concession is that instead of dedicated stationary tools I have a ShopSmith with several “special purpose tools” to fill out the operations I want to do.
(I do rough cut sheets outside the little shop with a straightedge and circular saw.)

The ShopSmith is a very real tool and especially with the dvr motor PowerPro upgrade can hold its own against my bigger, more expensive stuff at home.

Don’t laugh til you try it ….. I did and now I don’t. ...... :-)

..... for more detailed explanation of my SS based shop : http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/4678

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1564 posts in 3083 days


#8 posted 08-04-2017 04:32 PM

If you are used to stationary tools in your old shop, you are going to have to make many of your tools mobile for the new shop if you’re keeping all the tools. Lumbar storage is another issue. That usually takes up space. If you have room, you might consider building a smaller attached out building for the lumber

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4483 posts in 2191 days


#9 posted 08-04-2017 04:59 PM

Well I think you are going hate it. It is over a 50% reduction in space. It is certainly going to feel very claustrophobic once you get all of your tools in there. Maybe a few adjustments in tools will help. It will force you get very organized that is for sure. I think fairly quickly you will be dreaming about expanding it, especially if you like to build large pieces of furniture.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Brian's profile

Brian

16 posts in 149 days


#10 posted 08-05-2017 12:32 AM



You re likely have to make some hard choices
about the kind of work you re going to do
in the future. I can t see all that machinery
fitting into that space and still having room
to put stuff together.

One solution is to stop working in plywood
and jettison the table saw. The band saw
can do quite a range of work.

- Loren

Hey Loren thanks for the feedback. Pulling the rip cord on the TS seems crushing. I’m not yet completely comfortable with the bandsaw to use it to the degree that would be necessary to feel like the TS should go. Do you have any resources you would recommend to better work with a bandsaw? Currently I’m just winging it with the wonders manual.

-- Brian

View Brian's profile

Brian

16 posts in 149 days


#11 posted 08-05-2017 12:33 AM


I think you could consider selling the 20” planer, as painful as that might be, and replace it with one of the smaller machine out now like the DeWalt 735. you could store that machine under the wing of the chops when not in use and set it up on top of the TS when you need it.

Also, keep only the wood you need on hand if you must store it in the shop.

15 is a difficult dimension to deal with for a shop- no way to rip a 4×8 sheet of plywood unless you can open a wide door. You could ditch the TS if you replace it with a track saw. Personally I d have a hard time parting with my TS but might be your best option as Loren said. would clear up a lot of space.

- TungOil

Hey Tung, you bring up a point which I should add clarification to; there is no door other than a standard 3-0 door. This is limiting in and of itself. I think adding a roll up door would really expand the shop capacity. Parting with the planer is something I’ve strongly considered, but it comes with a trade. I have a fair selection of hand planes, but I don’t have a bench which would facilitate that much planing. Plus the 360 degree movement around such a bench makes the tool placement in a 15×15 shop even more critical. Perhaps I’m over thinking this! Lol

-- Brian

View Brian's profile

Brian

16 posts in 149 days


#12 posted 08-05-2017 12:45 AM


I use my pick up truck to crosscut plywood with a straight edge and a mini saw horse this works better for me :<))
as far as cabinets go try use wall cabinets as much as possible keep the floor space for tools
and as TungOil mention try point Table saw heading in direction of wide door :<)) in my old shop I also used the window behind me for 16 foot boards
then for tools layout shop so you joint your board then right to rip it ..I also use my table saw as a workbench for 3 reasons nice and flat ,and kind of a huge surface ,plus I can clamp stuff right to wings lightly LOL :<))
here is pic of mine 12 X 24 :

HOPE THIS HELPS YOU

- GR8HUNTER

Thanks Hunter! Your picture is very helpful. Thank you for that! You wrote about pointing a TS towards an open door. I don’t have anything but a standard 3-0 door. I think my solution involves adding a roll-up door. Do you have an outfeed table with your TS? I’m considering adding an folding out feed table. How do you take jointing and planing?

-- Brian

View Loren's profile

Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#13 posted 08-05-2017 12:47 AM


Hey Loren thanks for the feedback. Pulling the rip cord on the TS seems crushing. I m not yet completely comfortable with the bandsaw to use it to the degree that would be necessary to feel like the TS should go. Do you have any resources you would recommend to better work with a bandsaw? Currently I m just winging it with the wonders manual.

- Brian

I learned a lot from this book:
https://www.amazon.com/Band-Saw-Handbook-Mark-Duginske/dp/0806963980

Since you have a 17” model I’m guessing it
can take wider blades. While you can cut
straight with narrower blades the wide
ones really do a good job of it in solid wood.
If you’re not cutting plywood the blades
stay sharper too.

The one thing in solid wood furniture making
the band saw doesn’t do very well is crosscutting,
but a miter saw can handle narrower pieces
and a circular saw with a straightedge can
serve for wider panels.

View Brian's profile

Brian

16 posts in 149 days


#14 posted 08-05-2017 12:51 AM



Having just been through this exercise myself, I can tell you how I approached it.
I have the option of building a 12×18 shop in the backyard.
I am limited by set backs the city has in place.
I downloaded and familiarized myself with SketchUp.
I drew out the shop and tools I would be moving from the garage to the new shop.
I drew a 1×1 grid in SketchUp and placed it on the new shops floor so I could easily see how much room I would have between tools.

It was a real eye opener for me. My conclusion was that some of my stuff was going to have to stay in the garage. I was able to re-arrange things in multiple layouts to see all of the “what-if s”. I did this for over a year.

BTW…I m still in the garage! :)

- fivecodys

Wow! I love this! So I’m considering leaving the drill press, assembly table, sanding equipment, and finishing resources in the garage. That would leave all of the high-sawdust-producing equipment in the 15×15 shop. What would a hybrid solution look like for you? Would you consider splitting up the shop?

-- Brian

View Brian's profile

Brian

16 posts in 149 days


#15 posted 08-05-2017 12:54 AM



Put everything except the miter saw station on wheels. Move it to a back wall when not in use. That s how I do my 1 car garage area.

Brian

- bbasiaga

Solid advice. While I considered a similar mobile outlook, I’m man enough to say that I was deterred on the basis that I wanted to be more lazy. Don’t judge me!

-- Brian

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