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Need help on 220V line

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Forum topic by Srini posted 08-03-2017 03:25 PM 453 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Srini

29 posts in 620 days


08-03-2017 03:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question resource tip

I have recently bought bandsaw which works on both 220V and 110V. I have only 110V circuit in the garage, but it can handle only 15 Amps max. The saw needs 20 Amps circuit.

I am thinking of installing 220V line into garage. I notice, I have an unused 220V socket in the kitchen behind cooking range. We use only gas stove. When I checked the breaker on this 220V line, it is at 40 Amps. That part is good. This socket point in kitchen is very next to garage.

I am thinking to use this line and tap it to take the new line in to garage. I am thinking to either daisy chain, or use the new 220 three prong plug and draw the new line into garage.

What do you all think about this plan? Should I plan for new wire to handle 40 Amps? If so, what gauge? Do we ever need that much current for tools? I can only think for welding and other such high demand usage. Currently I do not have any welding stuff.

All help is appreciated!


10 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2970 posts in 553 days


#1 posted 08-03-2017 03:35 PM

I WOULD definitely run this into my garage :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Srini

29 posts in 620 days


#2 posted 08-03-2017 03:51 PM



I WOULD definitely run this into my garage :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Thanks for the reply.

I am looking to the question to either plug it and draw the line, or open the box (if it is openable) and daisy chain the connection for the new line?. Are any code violations in either of the approaches I need to be concerned of ?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4771 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 08-03-2017 03:54 PM

I think I run it to the garage and put a 30 amp outlet there (garage). If you add wire, it has to be sized to the breaker (or vice-versa) so either make the new wire the same size (probably #8) or change the breaker down to whatever you run….in which case you would want to pull that 40 amp outlet and cap that location. BTW, it sucks to work with #8 wire.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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WhyMe

910 posts in 1401 days


#4 posted 08-03-2017 04:04 PM

It’s a code violation to daisy chain and add a second outlet to that line. Circuits above 20A are to be dedicated. You can use a junction box and splice on more wire to run to the garage. The breaker can be no larger than the outlet it serves. If the saw calls for a 20A circuit, make it a 20A circuit. Also voltage is now 240V, not 220V.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1823 days


#5 posted 08-03-2017 07:56 PM

I’d just change the breaker to a 240v 20A and run some 12AWG wire with a new outlet.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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MrUnix

6021 posts in 2039 days


#6 posted 08-03-2017 08:02 PM

If the motor has a 20A limit and the breaker is sized to 40A, I hope your fire department is close by.

There is no danger running a 20A motor on a 40A circuit. The breaker is to protect the house wiring, not the equipment. The motor should have it’s own protection, either via an overload built into it, or in the starter used by the machine.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Srini

29 posts in 620 days


#7 posted 08-03-2017 08:15 PM

Thanks everybody for the good advice.

I saw the manual for G0513X2, and it draws 19A when wired for 110V, and only 9.5A when configured for 220V.

I did more research on local code and I was told inspectors will not approve if we tap from Circuits meant for Cooking Range or Dryer or such equipment. They need to be on dedicated circuit.

So, what I am planning is to draw a separator 240V line from main panel (yes, I do have some slots available) and protect that line with 40 AMPs breaker. On that line on the garage side, planning to install a sub-panel with 4 or more slots. This way, I can have both 240V line along with 110V lines, Good part is that my new 110V lines in the garage can be put on 12 gage wire and on 20 amps breaker in the sub panel. This approach solves my other problem of existing 110V outlets in the garage is only on 15 amps circuit and many times my compressor trip that line.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1823 days


#8 posted 08-03-2017 08:40 PM


There is no danger running a 20A motor on a 40A circuit. The breaker is to protect the house wiring, not the equipment. The motor should have it s own protection, either via an overload built into it, or in the starter used by the machine.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

My bad, I concede, I forget that it’s mostly about wire gauge and length of the run. MrUnix is spot on, ignore my previous statement.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1823 days


#9 posted 08-03-2017 08:41 PM



I d just change the breaker to a 240v 20A and run some 12AWG wire with a new outlet.

- UpstateNYdude

Fixed

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

910 posts in 1401 days


#10 posted 08-04-2017 01:29 AM

Well you’re calling 240V correctly, but half is not 110V, it’s 120V.

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