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Forum topic by oskretc posted 08-03-2017 01:19 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oskretc

2 posts in 135 days


08-03-2017 01:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: workbench table modular sturdy

Hi Everyone.

Total newbie here.

I’m in the process to design a new workbench, and I want it to take a modular approach.

First off, I want to build a frame that is sturdy on its own. and use that as the base for a reconfigurable table bench.

The following img is the frame, no fancy joins, just 2×4’s, perhaps using barrel nuts in the joints.

this is an example of how I could reconfigure the table

Question: Do you think the frame will be sturdy enough, am I not seeing very obvious flaws?


10 replies so far

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

310 posts in 1944 days


#1 posted 08-03-2017 01:52 PM

I think you are partially okay with that kind of setup but as it sits now you don’t have any lateral support so it will rack side to side fairly easily. You’ll want to add either a diagonal brace of some kind across the legs, or attach a wide stretcher like a 2×8 across the top of the legs just under the table. The 2×8 would give enough lateral strength if you screwed it a few times into each leg. Here is a rough modification to your sketchup drawing:

Also, you might need a fairly thick top so it doesn’t sag between the legs, a double thick layer of 3/4 ply would work fine. If you do 2 layers then stagger the joint between sections like a bricklayer to add strength to the joint.

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

688 posts in 655 days


#2 posted 08-03-2017 01:57 PM

I think Jarrett’s assessment is spot on.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10638 posts in 2219 days


#3 posted 08-04-2017 12:07 AM

No offense OP but you lack the experience to design a workbench. There are dozens of excellent designs that will meet your needs, pick one and build it; or at least take one and modify it. What you have is terrible.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oskretc

2 posts in 135 days


#4 posted 08-04-2017 08:50 AM

Hi, Jarrett. thanks for your advice, I definitly see what you mean,

I’ve added a modified version made of 4 4×4’s and 8 2×4’s to try to avoid lateral

I was thinking about 2 layers of plywood 15mm each. roughly 1 1/4 inches in total.

the reason why I want to build this kind of table is so I can move them depending on the current needs, e.g when sawing wide stock, move them to the left side of my table saw.

Thanks, Rick, and you are right, I have never ever chop a single piece of wood. still, I like to learn by doing…

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dbeck

47 posts in 197 days


#5 posted 08-04-2017 10:55 AM

That is how most of us have learned, by doing. The mistakes are the best learning experiences. Good luck on your new hobby.

View OleGrump's profile

OleGrump

132 posts in 183 days


#6 posted 08-04-2017 01:55 PM

Each of us builds our workbenches to suit our own needs and type of woodworking we do. Two recommendations for you: First, Read “The Workbench Book” by Landis. (My own thumb-worn copy is almost 30 years old, and I STILL enjoy it). This book contains a wealth of information covering styles and construction of many benches and vises. Take what you like from it, and adapt it to your own needs.
Secondly: Workbenches are evolutionary creatures. After you use one for awhile, you figure out what you like and dislike, and what you would do differently. As Roy Underhill says “Build one, figure out what you did wrong, then build another one the right way…..”
The main thing is BUILD IT. You can alter and improve on it as need or want demands.

-- OleGrump

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Rick_M

10638 posts in 2219 days


#7 posted 08-06-2017 08:03 AM



Thanks, Rick, and you are right, I have never ever chop a single piece of wood. still, I like to learn by doing…
- oskretc

The reason I came off harsh is because you are in a woodworking forum and presumably want to learn something. Learn by doing it right, not by designing wrong. Furniture (workbenches included) have evolved over centuries into their best possible forms and we build them the way we do for reasons that are not obvious to beginners. The height, weight, depth; it all matters. Also be wary of trying to anticipate what you need, that leads to time and money wasted. Build or buy what you need, when you need it.

Counterpoint: there are guys whose hobby is ‘the shop’ and they rarely or never actually build anything other than shop improvement projects (and that’s fine with me). Other guys here have called it ‘forever getting ready,’ and if that’s you, build whatever, however, you want. But if you want to learn woodworking, it’s more than hammering wood together in a random way until it stops falling down.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7661 posts in 2752 days


#8 posted 08-06-2017 11:42 AM



Thanks, Rick, and you are right, I have never ever chop a single piece of wood. still, I like to learn by doing…
- oskretc
—————————
The reason I came off harsh is because you are in a woodworking forum and presumably want to learn something. Learn by doing it right, not by designing wrong. Furniture (workbenches included) have evolved over centuries into their best possible forms and we build them the way we do for reasons that are not obvious to beginners. The height, weight, depth; it all matters. Also be wary of trying to anticipate what you need, that leads to time and money wasted. Build or buy what you need, when you need it.

Counterpoint: there are guys whose hobby is the shop and they rarely or never actually build anything other than shop improvement projects (and that s fine with me). Other guys here have called it forever getting ready, and if that s you, build whatever, however, you want. But if you want to learn woodworking, it s more than hammering wood together in a random way until it stops falling down.
- Rick M

+10

Several years ago (2010-2011) I also started my woodworking with a workbench. As suggested, I chose a well designed existing model/plan, and began by following instructions. Being the anal type that I am, I chose a plan that required a higher level of skills (that I would soon learn), rather than something simple. Why?... because I was going to need those skills anyway, at some point in time. Unfortunately, it took me two full years to complete my workbench because of a serious fall/injury that literally took several months to heal. That said, IMO do take the time and research workbench design and existing plans before moving forward.

A good workbench can and will last two or three lifetimes if constructed properly, and with the appropriate wood (usually a hardwood). Softwoods, like SYP 2×4s, can/will work in the short run, however they will tend to run into maintenance issues in a few years, such as loose joinery and flexing/splitting wood. IMO, do it right the first time and it will reward you for decades to come, each and every time you use it.

Good luck in what you choose to do with this project. Look forward to seeing your progress, so keep us posted.

BTW, this is mine:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/45812

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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waho6o9

8034 posts in 2415 days


#9 posted 08-06-2017 02:18 PM

Mirock has a modular workbench that might be of interest to you:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/212842

Some food for thought:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/tag/workbench

And the epic thread on workbenches:
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/31539

Enjoy your journey oskretc, it’ll be a good one and welcome to LJs!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4480 posts in 2190 days


#10 posted 08-06-2017 02:21 PM

Your design is similar to framing a window in a house. Great for houses, not so great for a workbench. Mortise and tenon are your friends. There is a thread on LJ that is called “workbench smackdown”. Check it out for some great ideas. Get a hold of one Chris Schwarz’s books on workbenches, it will give you a place to start. Another thing I recommend is deciding on the type vises you intend to use, incorporate them into the design from the get go. If you are planning on using bench dogs and holdfasts, then your top needs to be thicker.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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