LumberJocks

How to treat green wood?????

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by msinc posted 08-02-2017 11:04 PM 505 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 338 days


08-02-2017 11:04 PM

.......or at least wood that is not quite completely dry??? I had a section of peach tree trunk that was cut down and laid around for 2 years. I finally got around to cutting it to length and putting it on the lathe and making it round. What should I do with it to help keep it from cracking?? It is not slopping wet, but it isn’t exactly dry either. Thanks in advance for any info.


11 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#1 posted 08-03-2017 10:34 AM

What is the diameter of your round blank, where do you live, and where you going to store it? Fruit wood very prone to end checking and cracking might want to end seal until figure out what you want to turn with it. That checking & cracking can happen even after fruit wood at EMC and turning. Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 338 days


#2 posted 08-03-2017 01:13 PM

It’s about 6 inches, I live in southern Maryland {pretty humid} and I can store it anywhere…attic to basement. So am I correct to understand, you are saying that fruit wood like this is prone to and would probably crack and check even if it was dry and I turned it afterwards???? Thanks for the reply and info!!!

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

1088 posts in 3179 days


#3 posted 08-03-2017 03:45 PM

seal the ends with anchor seal and wrap the sides with that clear saran wrap type stuff that comes on a roll.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#4 posted 08-03-2017 04:09 PM

Depending upon where you live in MD may not want to wrap in Saran wrap or plastic bags due to humidity. Lot depends upon moisture content below 18 to 20% little chance of mold growth above twenty may see some mold growth. For most humid areas in the country wood could be between and 11 to 13% mositure content and safe to turn.

Lived in Charles county (indian Head) for awhile and familiar with humidity there still not as bad as where live now.

With exception of various species of Cherry wood which had lot success turning. My self and other turners leery of other fruit woods due them cracking & splitting just looking at them. If end seal and store out of the wheater & direct sun light natural air circulation will get you to EMC.

Being that log has been sitting around for two years I would just go for it and turn whatever had in mind and hope for the best.

-- Bill

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

961 posts in 2652 days


#5 posted 08-03-2017 04:12 PM

In my experience if you leave the pith in a log the chances of it splitting and checking are pretty high, even with sealed ends. Best approach is to divide the log down the middle, either by splitting or cutting it, then seal the ends.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

1088 posts in 3179 days


#6 posted 08-03-2017 04:33 PM

Hi Bill,
This is where I get confused. I just started saving wood and I thought one was supposed to leave the bark ON, and I watched a man on youtube who took the bark off and wrapped it. I know I’ve taken the bark off with the chain saw and had both the sides and ends crack, even though I sealed the ends.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#7 posted 08-04-2017 10:39 AM

Dilemma of bark on or off, lot of factors to consider. General idea turning away the bark will cut down chance of bugs and larva thriving in your blanks and or reduce chances of mold growth.

Vicki, someone living in arid part of the country using saran wrap or plastic bags temporally might work for him or her. If they want to allow that blank to reach EMC will have to remove that wrapping or bag at some point.

Drying wood is essentially a water removal process think evaporation. Wood logs dry from the outside in end sealing will slow down the process some what but won’t stop wood from drying whether bark on or off. End sealing alone not always fullproof!

Myself and other turnes have left the bark on and ended up turning away bug larva because left the bark on longer than should have. Think have pencil holder on my project page with bug tracks didn’t completely turn away.

That burl pictures postied few days back had crawling ant infestation on one half those little black dots in picture are live ants. Will see some ant holes in final product when post that. Used bug spray to kill those ants, and will rinse water before turning.

Every turner has to come up with how they process logs to turning blanks based upon where they live, species and characteristics of those logs with understanding nothing is fullproof!

-- Bill

View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 338 days


#8 posted 08-04-2017 12:34 PM

Thanks for all the replies folks!!! I agree there doesn’t seem to be anything “cut in stone” so to speak. I have recently taken wild black cherry burl and a big {probably the largest I have ever seen} red oak burl and cut them down and turned them into blanks on my lathe with not a crack or check yet!!! Around here it seems like if you just cut to length a section of trunk and leave the bark on it the thing will never dry out. it will lay on the ground and rot before any moisture leaves it. Even if you do not paint or otherwise seal the ends.
The peach log I was questioning about was as wet inside wen I got turning it as the day I cut it down. I really figured it should have dried out some, but now, after turning it I have to say probably not.

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

1088 posts in 3179 days


#9 posted 08-04-2017 03:53 PM

Thanks Bill. Anyone seen a book on this topic. I really do get the principle of what’s going on. Just want to make sure I do it right for my location. Right now my stash is bug free with ends sealed and bark on most of it. I keep it in a vinyl shed with ventilation via vents and joints that aren’t air tight. The rack/shelves have spaces to allow air flow.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#10 posted 08-04-2017 08:05 PM

Vicki, looks like you have a great plan. Here is a free Wood Handbook with lot of technical info but if just go to the chapters you need to answer your questions and will find a lot of charts and pictures that explain more than just the words written.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

MSINC, no there is nothing written in stone when it comes to drying or turning wood. Everyone has a different experience even with wood from the same tree. Still have a few facts or principles have to follow to increase our success rate in both drying, turning and finishing. This time of year depending upon species water weight can exceed 100% wait till winter and sap not running and percentages goes down. Wood gains and loses moisture through out its life due to relative humidity in the area.

-- Bill

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

1088 posts in 3179 days


#11 posted 08-05-2017 01:16 AM

Thanks Bill. That looks very helpful and I love the price!

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com