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how to removecherry burl

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Forum topic by Karda posted 08-02-2017 10:55 PM 547 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


08-02-2017 10:55 PM

Hi, I found some nice cherry but it has been cut a few weeks and is starting ti crack but I think I can save some. One piece has a burl about the size of a hard ball. Is it to small to be of any use, if it is of use is there a special way to remove it from the trunk thanks here are pics


7 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

743 posts in 329 days


#1 posted 08-03-2017 12:56 AM

you can control the checking by painting the cut ends ASAP. Many folks use latex paint for this. In the past I used a special wax emulsion called Anchorseal that worked very well also. The burl might be ov use to someone that turns.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#2 posted 08-03-2017 02:37 AM

yes but how do I remove it without damaging the burls I know nothing about them. I would give it to any body who wants it I don’t turn things that small

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TungOil

743 posts in 329 days


#3 posted 08-03-2017 03:39 AM

I can’t help with the burl removal, hopefully someone with experience in this are will step in.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#4 posted 08-03-2017 10:36 AM

That’s not a burl just a knob on the tree for lack of better term.

-- Bill

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1135 days


#5 posted 08-03-2017 01:39 PM

I would just take a slab off about 1” thick since most of this would be wasted anyway.
It may or may not be a bur. It may also be where a limb was pruned and it grew over it. Here is a quote from an online source that explains it.
”The wood around the wound begins to produce special compounds in the wood cells that set up a wall or barrier to isolate the infected area. This is called compartmentalization. In a vigorous tree, new growth continues to form and add to the sound wood. ”

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1564 days


#6 posted 08-03-2017 02:20 PM

Mike, if you have any tools for making hollow forms or vases, make your cut about 4” back from the bark. Figure out the diameter you want, and trim that on your band saw. Mount the end of the knob in your chuck as is. It looks big enough to get the jaws to clamp around it, but if they don’t, pressure from the tailstock should give you enough friction to allow turning. Turn a tenon, shape the outside up to the jaws, then reverse it. Clean up the area that the jaws contacted, drill out a hole appropriate to the neck size, clean it up some, and you could have a fairly nice looking vahhhzzze, weed pot or whatever you choose to call it. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#7 posted 08-03-2017 06:07 PM

thank for the suggestions

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