LumberJocks

Is this a good Plane? ( stanley bailey)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by amateur77 posted 08-01-2017 11:37 PM 912 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View amateur77's profile

amateur77

14 posts in 501 days


08-01-2017 11:37 PM

I have been looking to purchase jointer plane and a near mint one came up for good price,
however… I’m not sure how old it is and is it any good? It even has a packaging which doesn’t looks old so Im worrying if its any good if its one of the new releases :( :( :(

I have no idea how to tell the age, but I got some pictures,
anyone can shed some light?





11 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8146 posts in 3574 days


#1 posted 08-01-2017 11:51 PM

Is that made in the UK? Adding a pic of the front lever cap to show the key hole will help. So would any patent dates. It’s old enough to have the square edges on the blade, but new enough that there’s a ring around the front knob. It also has a cast Y-adjuster. I’d guess somewhere between type 14 and type 18….1929 to 1947.

How much?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

10164 posts in 2650 days


#2 posted 08-01-2017 11:54 PM

It is an English stanley and I would guess much newer that type 18.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View amateur77's profile

amateur77

14 posts in 501 days


#3 posted 08-02-2017 12:16 AM



View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15694 posts in 2817 days


#4 posted 08-02-2017 12:26 AM

English made, no issue on quality, but it’s a fore plane and not a jointer.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

654 posts in 2576 days


#5 posted 08-02-2017 12:45 AM

Personally, I prefer the older US made Stanley Bailey’s.
Pretty sure your’s is UK or “England”. Are the knob and tote plastic? Can’t tell for sure. Wood is my preference.
Sharpen the blade and tune it. Doesn’t really matter what other thinks.
If it works for you, then it is a great plane.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View amateur77's profile

amateur77

14 posts in 501 days


#6 posted 08-02-2017 08:32 AM

Alright thanks ,yes it’s UK made and I’m from UK myself :) I kinda wanted wooden handles myself and one of the older planes, but I have been searching on ebay for ages and all of the planes which are in nice presentable condition go for ridiculous money. Or…You can purchase something that is rusted out and beat up :(

I found someone who was willing to sell me this no6 AND identical no 5 1/2 together for £50 shipped , both of them from the pictures/sellers description are only used a few times and in mint condition
-however the packaging really scared me as it looked so modern and fresh that I thought maybe it’s made in like the last 5 or 10years which would be a real no-no :D

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

515 posts in 1660 days


#7 posted 08-02-2017 01:59 PM

I think you will be happy with them, and the price seems right.
As far as there age. Google stanley hand plane age. If there is a patent number on it you will be able to find it’s age range.
Once you have them, if you want to do any upgrades, Lee valley tools in Canada sells modern cap iron and blades for stanley planes. Just go to the plane section on there site.
http://www.leevalley.com
I have three old stanley planes myself. My #5 dated back to around 1900. And I had to restore it. Cap iron was junk. Replaced it with the Lee valley set. Went with the PM-V11 blade. Turned out very nice.
Lee valley also has templates to make your own tote for the old planes.
That #5 I restored also needed a tote. Here is the link for them. If you plane has the plastic bangles then you can make your own out of wood.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=63262&cat=1,46168,63262

-- John

View Don W's profile

Don W

19007 posts in 2766 days


#8 posted 08-03-2017 10:55 PM

As already said, it’s not a jointer, but that plane can be made to work very well. There is no need to upgrade anything. Put a little elbow grease into tuning it and put it to work.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3846 days


#9 posted 08-03-2017 11:07 PM

For a time Garret Wade (a US dealer in
fine tools) was selling UK-made Bailey
planes alongside the Record line. At the
time they claimed the UK Baileys were
a little nicer than the US-made ones, using
thicker castings.

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

21741 posts in 2882 days


#10 posted 08-03-2017 11:27 PM

According to Stanley….they called it a Small Jointer.

The No. 6c I have is a tad older…type 10. Still using the original iron, too. Nice change of pace for the No. 7c and the No. 8. Can be used as both a jointer ( for shorter lengths) and to flatten the faces of panels like a smoother…

Currently using a Made in England No. 4c ( has a wierd model number behind the frog) to surface Curly Maple. It has them plastic handles, haven’t had any “issues” with them. See-through shavings in the Curly Maple, no tear-out. Original iron.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

975 posts in 638 days


#11 posted 08-03-2017 11:44 PM

Hey amateur77, I think you found a super nice plane there. If you get it tuned up real nice, you should be able to do about whatever you need with it. Even though it is a No 6, it should work okay as a jointer too for the time being anyway. One piece of advice, put an ever-so-slight arc to the outside ends of the cutting edge. You can do that with a few strokes on a fine stone. Just slightly rock the blade on each stroke. Just enough so it doesn’t dig in and leave a noticeable ridge on each pass. I wouldn’t worry too much about how flat the bottom is, might want to give it a little lapping though and a couple passes on each side to slightly round them over. Don’t tighten the frog screws too much just good and snug that way you should be able to adjust the blade forward and aft in the throat opening just a bit without taking it apart. That’s a nice plane for sure. Congrats.
Mike

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com