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question on glue line rip

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Forum topic by buckbuster31 posted 08-01-2017 07:37 PM 590 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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buckbuster31

198 posts in 349 days


08-01-2017 07:37 PM

I noticed on my glue line rip freud it says up to 1 inch thick material. I rip a lot of 6/4 and even 8/4 wood for table tops. Is the glue line not good for this? Also I saw a thick stock rip 18 tooth that I am considering buying for my thicker. What are your alls thoughts?


17 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9606 posts in 3482 days


#1 posted 08-01-2017 07:46 PM

I think you need a jointer.

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buckbuster31

198 posts in 349 days


#2 posted 08-01-2017 07:49 PM

I have a jointer. That has nothing to do with the question posed

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knotscott

7784 posts in 3209 days


#3 posted 08-01-2017 07:56 PM

The Freud 30T GLRs (LM74/LM75) use extremely tight side angles to give a more polished edge. It works well for the polished edges, but the same characteristics that cause the polish also cause more heat, which can lead to burning in thicker woods, thus the 1” recommendation.

An 18T will chomp through really thick would with less resistance, but also a rougher cut. Depending on your saw, you might find that a 24T rip blade would serve you well, giving a decent cut with no burning.

FWIW, Cripe Distribution offers the German made Delta Industrial 35-611 18T for < $30 on Ebay if you want to try one.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#4 posted 08-01-2017 08:13 PM

I will agree with knotscott on the lower tooth count for thicker ripping. That said, I have not had any problems with my Freud GLR burning any stock, I just slow down the feed rate with 8/4 stock.

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bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2901 days


#5 posted 08-01-2017 08:26 PM

I’m assuming a panel glue up. If standard thickness TS might be ok, but for thick stuff, I tend to like to face the pieces together and run accross jointer together, so if any off at all, they will offset one another and be perfect. (if one is at 90.2 the other would be 89.8 and compensate)

You get up into the 5 & 6/4 stuff and you might get some deflection in that blade. Go a lower tooth count and it will cut, but be a little ragged.

You could do your rough with your blade and finish with a hand plane.

Many ways to skin the cat.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Rick_M

10606 posts in 2214 days


#6 posted 08-01-2017 08:51 PM

It’s about # of teeth inside the wood at any given time. More teeth give you a better cut but also more resistance and possibility of burning.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rich

1975 posts in 423 days


#7 posted 08-01-2017 10:16 PM


I think you need a jointer.

- Loren


I have a jointer. That has nothing to do with the question posed

- buckbuster31

Loren knows his stuff and gave you good advice. Pretty rude to dismiss it like that. Since you have a jointer, learn to use it. It’s the easiest way to ensure clean joints and a perfectly flat surface after glue up.

I’d explain in detail, but it has nothing to do with the question posed.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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martyoc

40 posts in 751 days


#8 posted 08-01-2017 11:20 PM

I’ve used my Freud glue line rip on oak and walnut, mostly for table tops, with very good results with 4/4 to 6/4 thicknesses.

-- Marty O'C

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buckbuster31

198 posts in 349 days


#9 posted 08-02-2017 01:36 AM


I think you need a jointer.

- Loren

I have a jointer. That has nothing to do with the question posed

- buckbuster31

Loren knows his stuff and gave you good advice. Pretty rude to dismiss it like that. Since you have a jointer, learn to use it. It s the easiest way to ensure clean joints and a perfectly flat surface after glue up.

I d explain in detail, but it has nothing to do with the question posed.

- RichTaylor

I agree, and I wasn’t necessary dismissing. Yes, I have a jointer and yes I know how to use and yes I use it prior to getting a glue line ready. My question, however, was not about the use of a jointer but rather the use of s glue line rip blade to rip thick stock. Nothing more nothing less.

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GR8HUNTER

2951 posts in 546 days


#10 posted 08-02-2017 03:16 AM

I never had any trouble with mine as long as its sharp :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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WhoMe

1564 posts in 3077 days


#11 posted 08-03-2017 04:51 AM

I have a 3hp saw and when using it with a full kerf GLR on 8/4 maple, mahogany and cherry, I have not had any issues with burning. With a properly aligned saw, and the blade sharp, it produces really smooth edges. In really impressed and life the results. Especially since I don’t have a joiner.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1138 posts in 1058 days


#12 posted 08-03-2017 04:57 AM


I think you need a jointer.

- Loren

I have a jointer. That has nothing to do with the question posed

- buckbuster31

Loren knows his stuff and gave you good advice. Pretty rude to dismiss it like that. Since you have a jointer, learn to use it. It s the easiest way to ensure clean joints and a perfectly flat surface after glue up.

I d explain in detail, but it has nothing to do with the question posed.

- RichTaylor

So I guess there’s no need to use a table saw after jointing? So joint one side, flip, joint the other and 2 parallel sides?
Glad I knew not to waste my time on the table saw now.

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Rich

1975 posts in 423 days


#13 posted 08-03-2017 05:16 AM


So I guess there s no need to use a table saw after jointing? So joint one side, flip, joint the other and 2 parallel sides?
Glad I knew not to waste my time on the table saw now.

- AZWoody

That wasn’t the point, and you know it. Nice try though.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View JohnDi's profile

JohnDi

20 posts in 1267 days


#14 posted 08-03-2017 10:13 AM

I just bought the same blade and used it to cut 3” African Mahogany on my TS 3650 for a bent lam curved rail.
I cut them about 3/16 wide and did not experience any significant burning.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

823 posts in 2647 days


#15 posted 08-03-2017 11:28 AM



I m assuming a panel glue up. If standard thickness TS might be ok, but for thick stuff, I tend to like to face the pieces together and run accross jointer together, so if any off at all, they will offset one another and be perfect. (if one is at 90.2 the other would be 89.8 and compensate)

- bonesbr549

This is new to me. Can you expand on this technique?

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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