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Forum topic by andy_P posted 08-01-2017 07:19 PM 804 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


08-01-2017 07:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: picture frame round question

A friend drew this beautiful flower and filigree (if that is a proper term) on the back of a round paper plate. She actually drew it using an ordinary ball point pen and making series after series of shaded lines. That is about the best I can describe it. I’d like to build a round picture frame to display it and although I have made many, many picture frames, I haven’t got the foggiest idea on how to build a round one. I checked the internet but cannot find a good set of plans or instructions. I imagine you end up with a series of angles that equal 360 degrees…..and that is a guess

Have any of you made a round frame or know of a specific way to figure out just how to go about it? I guess I could glue up a panel and cut an inner and outer circle; then rabbet the inner part to hold the glass and item. (I imagine getting a round piece of glass is not going to be cheap) but that just seems that this “thing” deserves something better.

Sure would appreciate any ideas, comments or some place to get the information I need.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.


19 replies so far

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

637 posts in 2528 days


#1 posted 08-01-2017 10:48 PM

https://m.youtube.com/watch?t=0h0m0s&v=I3wOeF1G3vQ

Andy my good man.

Here is the link that I saved from the Internet for a project that I have coming up that may be of help to you. I have not tried it yet but will be On my next project. Let me know if you can view this and if it works out for you. Take care my friend

-- Measure twice and cut once.....sneak up on it! Steve Lien

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Loren

9610 posts in 3482 days


#2 posted 08-01-2017 11:05 PM

I’ve done glass doors with half-round tops.

Depending on the size of the frame you might
want to use 8 or more segments. Join and
glue them. You’ll be cutting away a lot
of material from the polygon so plan your
joinery to be on the “save” sides of the
waste cuts. Butt joints are probably easiest
for a smallish frame, especially if you can
put staples in the back.

Screw the polygon down to a piece of plywood
and use a router trammel to cut the waste
away on the inside and outside. Sawing away
most of the waste first will make the routing
go faster and with less mess.

A glass shop can cut round glass. I doubt it
will be very costly.

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

170 posts in 1308 days


#3 posted 08-01-2017 11:39 PM

I’ve done several, most of them in the 12” range. I have a lathe so it makes getting them perfectly round very easy, but you can achieve the same thing with a band saw or scroll saw.

All mine have been 24 segments. They are made just as any other segmented ring for a segmented bowl is made.

In the case of 24 segments, the angle of the cuts on a table saw or mitre saw is 7.5 degrees. (360/24/2).

The length of wider side of the segment is determined by taking the diameter of the piece, multiplying that by pi (3.14), the dividing that by 24.

If I can be of any more help (assuming any of this helped) just ask. These really are not very difficult.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1273 posts in 755 days


#4 posted 08-01-2017 11:53 PM

andy_P,

As Loren said, the glass shop should be able to provide a round piece of single strength glass with little effort and probably for not much money.

Other sources could be a round frame from Walmart or a craft store like Hobby Lobby. If this turns out to be the better option, the frame could be discarded and the glass from the discarded frame used in your project.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#5 posted 08-02-2017 06:10 AM

You can make a rough pattern on cardboard, then layout and glue wood to give you the approximate shape. The only long pieces would be the top and bottom [or left and right, depending on how you look at it].

The nice thing about this approach is, you can use scraps and most only have to be a bit longer than the thickness of frame.

As others said, you can use a band saw or router to get a perfectly round frame. You might have to double back tape it to a sacrificial piece of plywood to run it through the band saw.

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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#6 posted 08-02-2017 04:11 PM

Thanks for all the input, guys.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

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MT_Stringer

3115 posts in 3066 days


#7 posted 08-02-2017 06:40 PM


Thanks for all the input, guys.

- andy_P

Call, or go by, your local glass shop and ask them how much. They can install it for you if you want.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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splintergroup

1694 posts in 1057 days


#8 posted 08-02-2017 09:48 PM

I’ve made dozens with a router table circle jig.
Basically I cut a bunch of 1/8 circle segments (22.5 deg end angles) and glue two or three seam-overlapping layers together, just like plywood. A trick is to glue them up into a half-circle, square the ends, then complete the glue. This makes all the miter glue seams perfect

A piece of masonite with a 1/2” hole in the center is then double-taped onto the circle, placed over the circle jig pin on the router table, then various cuts are done to get the circular shape and rabbets for the back.

This is a lighted frame I made for one of the wife’s glass creations:

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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#9 posted 08-03-2017 01:19 AM

Splintergroup, that is a beautiful piece alright, but you have lost me on what you did. How big is that piece? You say “a bunch of 1/8 circle segments”??? According to the 22.5 angles, can I assume that there are a total of 16 pieces? I’m going to show my ignorance by asking what you mean “seam-overlapping”. Are you saying that you cut the pieces from a 1/8 inch thick stock, glue them end to end, repeat the process for the next layer and then glue two or three layers together overlapping the seams on each layer? The actual circle shape is then accomplished on the circle jig. Sorry if appear “dense”.......well, I am…LOL.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2186 days


#10 posted 08-03-2017 02:57 AM

Make a trammel jig for your router. Pretty easy.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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shipwright

7779 posts in 2632 days


#11 posted 08-03-2017 05:35 AM

You can make them on a lathe. These were rings for porthole style windows so the rebates are wrong for picture frames but they could be made the same way.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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splintergroup

1694 posts in 1057 days


#12 posted 08-03-2017 04:03 PM


Splintergroup, that is a beautiful piece alright, but you have lost me on what you did. How big is that piece?

Thanks! The glass in the center is 10” diameter, the ring is a bit more then 1” wide.


You say “a bunch of 1/8 circle segments”??? According to the 22.5 angles, can I assume that there are a total of 16 pieces?

Sorry for the lack of details, I was short on time 8^)

The pieces are about 1/4” thick, eight in total for a layer of the circle (basically making a stop sign).

Paul’s picture above (top left) shows the construction. I also go to six segments on smaller diameters.
The angle cut on the ends of the trapezoids is 22.5 degrees, when you join two of these together they form a 45 degree angle.
To complete a ring, it requires eight of these trapezoids.


I m going to show my ignorance by asking what you mean “seam-overlapping”. Are you saying that you cut the pieces from a 1/8 inch thick stock, glue them end to end, repeat the process for the next layer and then glue two or three layers together overlapping the seams on each layer? The actual circle shape is then accomplished on the circle jig. Sorry if appear “dense”.......well, I am…LOL.

8^)
No, no assumptions here, I was clearly to vague.
Paul’s picture shows two layers with the overlap. I’ve used two layers but will often go to three for free standing objects like I have pictured.

You want the seams distributed like bricks in a wall for strength. They are end grain joints so any mechanical help like staggering is always a bonus. The trick is to glue two trapezoids together, end to end, then glue two of these “sets” together end to end creating a half-circle arc. I glue them by applying glue to the ends, joining the pieces then stretching masking tape across the seam (on both sides) to effectively clamp the joint. I’ll then place the assembly between two flat surfaces to keep everything flat until the glue dries.

Since I can never get perfect angles, two of theses half circles will always show a slight gap when joined. What I do to fix it is secure the half circle to a board and trim the end on the table saw. After all, the ends to be joined are in a straight line. This trimming makes for a perfect joint and all eight of the joints in the ring are perfect.

I wrote up a procedure for a clock face that uses the same techniques (with pictures!) Of interest (about 1/2 way down) is gluing the segments together then trimming the two halves.

After the circle is complete, I sand the surface flat on my drum sander then layer two or three of these rings with staggered seams.

To this stacked set of rings, I double-sideded tape a square of tempered hardboard to one side. The hardboard has a 1/2” hole drilled through the center, this is the pivot axis for my router table circle jig.

I usually do an outside diameter trim with the same jig on the bandsaw to get close to final diameter before using the router. Care needs to be taken on the router table to prevent the bit from trying to spin the circle with the bit.

To cut the inside circle and rabbets (for recessed glass, etc.) I simply move the jig closer to the router bit by the correct amount, then raise the bit up in shallow increments until I know I’ve cut through the thickness of the circle and am contacting the hardboard (which is on top, of course 8^).
The rabbets are done the same way, except I obviously only raise the bit as much as needed.

Overall this is a many-step process, but the frame is very strong and I can use special woods and/or combinations to get different effects. The seams are perfect, no gaps, and I can accurately dimension all the rabbets, etc.

I’d love to have a lathe as opposed to using the router table, it would be far easier.

I’ll be making a few more of these later this year and I’ll do a detailed post on it. Until then, I may have some photos of some steps if I’ve still been to vague.

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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#13 posted 08-04-2017 07:49 PM

Splinter,
Thank you so much for taking the time to clarify. I guess I read between the lines correctly. I especially appreciate your comment about the luck you have with cutting angles. It is good to know I am not alone; nice tip on trimming also. I went through your tutorial on the clock face….Beautiful work!!! I envy the fact that you have a drum sander and the good fortune you experience in re sawing. I’ve never been able to do a good job of re sawing and I’ve tried all the good blades…..Timberwolf, Wood Slicer; re adjusted and aligned my Grizzly over and over again. Maybe I should have invested in a better saw. Anyway, thanks for all your help. You do beautiful work.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9754 posts in 3263 days


#14 posted 08-05-2017 12:28 AM

If you plan to make more circle frames, or just need more accuracy fo any angle cuts, you might like this.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View andy_P's profile

andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#15 posted 08-05-2017 01:49 AM

Well, I’ll be (as John Wayne would say). I’ve been a Rockler Customer for years; never saw this or heard of it. A little pricy but it sure looks like something I should have purchased a long time ago. Thanks for the heads up.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

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