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Here is one of the tools I made for woodturning spralling texturing

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Forum topic by SCOTSMAN posted 01-04-2011 10:33 PM 2958 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


01-04-2011 10:33 PM

OK I promised you I would show you the new texturing spiralling tool.The red one is a robert sorby Micro texturing tool and I have made the same with my own design slightly heavier with a design improvement as sorbies are made more for mass production.I hope you like this I have made many more i tools if you wish to see them.Alistair

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-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease


14 replies so far

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#1 posted 01-04-2011 11:02 PM

I meant to say the cutters heads themselves are bought as I have no way of heat treating them.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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SteveL

143 posts in 2514 days


#2 posted 01-04-2011 11:35 PM

Very nice—you must have some metalworking tools in addition to your woodworking tools. For those of us new to turning, could you tell us how they work? Do you hold the cutter tool on a diagonal to the workpiece? What patterns can you make with it. How do you know how fast to move it along the workpiece?

-- SteveL

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#3 posted 01-04-2011 11:48 PM

Yes over the last twelve years as well as a nice purpose built woodshop, I have a smaller machine shop which is very fully eqipped as I have no more room for machines LOL I have to almost squeeze myself in the door.LOL . I can show you a few pics if you havent already seen them.Anyway these texturing spiralling tools are used in many ways to say a thread chaser in wood .Of course if you havent seen a thread chaser then I am giving you little help,you apply the tools either horizontally although better results are done someway between horizontally and vertically you have full means of adjustment with locking allen bolts. So when the wood is spinning apply the tool at said angle from the tool rest and work it from tailstock to headstock at an sensible spead. There is no great rush, but you will eventually get a flow which is comfortable yourself.the beginings of this is very much trial and error practice will be needed so don’t start off with your best turnings.The harder the wood the better these don’t work too well on pine and so forth.Here are a couple of sorby sites to watch.Look up sorby micro spiralling toolon google etc for further information.I hope this helps.Alistair

http://www.robert-sorby.co.uk/spiral_texture.htm

http://www.woodworkersguide.com/2009...rby-tool-demo/

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3045 days


#4 posted 01-05-2011 01:17 AM

You have a great talent for machine shop work.

I’d love to see more of your work.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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jamsie

90 posts in 1984 days


#5 posted 01-05-2011 05:26 PM

Show us the lot! I’m very interested in texturing.

-- Jamsie

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sedcokid

2686 posts in 2344 days


#6 posted 01-05-2011 06:25 PM

Were you a tool maker by chance? I see you are talented in that way doing metal work as well. I am a retired tool maker and wish I have some metal working machines. I would like to see the other tools you have made.

Thanks for sharing!

-- Chuck Emery, Michigan,

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#7 posted 01-05-2011 07:01 PM

OK jamsie I will show then asap probably tomorrow do you want to see the machine shop or things I made or both or what?LOL
Chuck I was an orthodontic technician so I made every kinds of orthodontic appliances you can think of (you call them braces I think) including five years in charge of a large laboratory/surgery orthodotic department in Germany where I learned to speak German (though I did it at university too) I did this for 29 years inc 7 years at the university dental hospital in Glasgow studying I also did crowns bridges denture work etc during that time mostly self employed working for local surgeons here and abroad .Bron and I got into buying property ( apartments to rent out,) then we bought a largeish hotel 27 bedrooms overlooking the sea.
So we have been busy LOL.
I didn’t even know exactly what a toolmaker does although I now have a rough idea.I attended a club each friday for around five years for retired engineers although I am not one myself I was allowed to join .
We paid an annual fee for being taught exactly the way things are done,( all work to the nearest inch .LOL So although I have a reasonably good grounding in machining and have my own workshop I am no expert believe me.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Pop

419 posts in 2692 days


#8 posted 01-05-2011 07:01 PM

Hi Scotsman! I’ve seen your machine shop. To be honest your machine shop looks better equipped than your woodshop. Did I see correct? Is that 1 ton lathe on a wood floor? I also see a shaper. For some reason I don’t see them around much anymore. I always liked that machine. Your tool looks better than Sorby’s. Fantastic work.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#9 posted 01-05-2011 07:22 PM

Not quite true POP both are equally well equipped I made the woodshop myself with my bare hands it is double glazed and centrally heated and has a wide variety of modern machinery inc a large sliding tale saw three lathes etc etc etc.I have a fantastic lathe for machining which I was lucky to aquire the guy I bought it from got it from Oxford university were it had done little work it is a beauty with self regulating speed control etc the new cost of it was in nineteen eighty seven £37.000.I got it for a small fraction of that and went down four hundred miles to England on the welsh borders and helped the guy drive the truck back the next day he was very kind to me and I have been very lucky here is a link to the metal lathe I have Alistair ps
mine is the smart and brown modern one with the flat head 10 24 vsl variable speed lathe

http://www.lathes.co.uk/smartbrown/page6.html

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#10 posted 01-05-2011 07:39 PM

The guy who runs this site Mark ,uses my lathe at the front of this website the green one.This was before I built my machine shop but you can see the lathe as it was delivered.Alistair
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smart_and_brown_lathes/

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#11 posted 01-05-2011 09:21 PM

POP The 1.2 ton lathe To answer your question is sitting on the concrete floor with a wood floor brought up to meet it.
My machine shop is on a slope and I corrected/levelled the lathe at the back of the shop then continued to build the floor around it.The mill is about .75 ton and is sitting directly on wooden floor directly on polythened sheeting over concrete florr but I can at least move that the floor boards are the type used for decking and are very tough about one and a half inches or more hard wood.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Pop

419 posts in 2692 days


#12 posted 01-05-2011 10:46 PM

Hi Alistair, Thanks for the info on your lathe. I was really intreasted in how it could sit on a wooden floor. I wasn’t putting your woodshop down. It’s just that most of us either go with a woodshop or a machine shop You have the good luck of having 2 different rooms for the two. I keep looking at a lathe & milling machine, but I have only one room and sawdust & machine oil don’t mix very well. You have a dream shop.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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SCOTSMAN

5584 posts in 2331 days


#13 posted 01-05-2011 10:55 PM

Thanks POP your very kind.I am trying to explain that the woodshop is about four+times the size of the machine shop.My woodshop is on a slope behind my house as this area is very hilly anyway I just managed (by taking most of the woodworking machinery to bits to get them up a flight of steps and into the woodshop not a job for a 1.2 ton lathe etc see now what I mean apart from that as you said it’s better to seperate them because of the dust .Your a good man POP your encouragement and others here drives me on.I alo know how lucky I am with my shops to have them before it became too late to enjoy them.MY poor father in law worked from a table in the anti room off the kitchen for years .By the time he finally got a little workshop it was too late for him to enjoy.Please let that be a lesson for all here.I hear of all the niggles here which affect me too but I constantly tell people try to enjoy what you have Including your family I intend to use what I have left enjoying the rest of my life and I never tire of the hobby.God Bless Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Don Newton

712 posts in 2364 days


#14 posted 01-10-2011 03:33 AM

Scotsman my friend, You continue to inspire with your dedication to the hobby and your outlook on life. I would really love to see some pictures of your shop inside and out. HAPPY HOGMANY to you and Bron.

-- Don, Pittsburgh

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