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water based dyes that "POP"

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Forum topic by happy_budah posted 01-04-2011 04:13 PM 2826 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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happy_budah

132 posts in 3264 days


01-04-2011 04:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing trick tip resource

i wanted to do a “sunburst” of red to orange to yellow….. and was wondering what the best brand of water based aniline dye is, or who has the most vibrant colors? Ive seen a demo on the fine woodworking website and want to try it but am stuck on the type of dye to get??? any suggestions of dye and technique are wanted and welcome
Shawn

-- the journy of a thousand miles begins with a single step " Lou-Tzu"


11 replies so far

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Howie

2656 posts in 2388 days


#1 posted 01-04-2011 04:15 PM

I use Transtint(woodcraft) and have been very well satisfied with them. I would suggest “sealing” them before applying a final finish.

-- Life is good.

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Ken90712

16955 posts in 2654 days


#2 posted 01-04-2011 04:54 PM

Trifem is a master at using dies I would e mail him.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

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tyskkvinna

1310 posts in 2451 days


#3 posted 01-04-2011 06:11 PM

I’ve also been very happy with Transtint.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2945 days


#4 posted 01-04-2011 06:44 PM

I dido TransTint too. You can get it at Rockler also.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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happy_budah

132 posts in 3264 days


#5 posted 01-04-2011 10:49 PM

thanks every one, i forgot to ask are the powdered better than the liquid fromulations? and Ken how do i find Trifem?

-- the journy of a thousand miles begins with a single step " Lou-Tzu"

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Howie

2656 posts in 2388 days


#6 posted 01-05-2011 01:30 AM

happy: I use the powdered for dying and Mixol(liquid) for tinting finishes. Mixol does NOT mix with poly but does with shellac. It is very powerful stuff, only a drop is usually needed.

-- Life is good.

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shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#7 posted 01-05-2011 05:04 AM

I use ColorFX liquid concentrates. This is a great starter set at a great price: http://www.woodessence.com/ColorFX-Dye-Trial-12-Color-Kits-P51C12.aspx

Check my blogs for more photos but here’s a sample

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Jonathan

2608 posts in 2516 days


#8 posted 01-05-2011 07:07 AM

I will be picking up some Transtint soon as I like the fact that it is compatible with so many different things (you can mix it directly into a lot of different finishes). In addition, it is easy to keep track of your mix strengths by simply counting the drops. If you use the powdered anilines, you either need to have an accurate scale that measures in grams, or you have to mix a large quantity up at once. I have used Transfast dye and I liked it pretty well, but I have an accurate kitchen scale, so I was vale to mix up a relatively small quantity since it was a small project. I used distilled water, and heated the water up first a bit. Make sure to wear latex or rubber gloves because any of the dyes or pigments will stain your skin. You can mix aniline dye colors for different shades/colors, but do not mix them in powdered form, only mix them once you’ve got them in liquid form. Don’t store them in metal containers either. Something like an old spaghetti sauce jar, canning jar, etc. Is good… basically a glass container.

Just to clarify, Mixol is a pigment. I haven’t used it yet, but from everything I’ve seen, read, and heard about it, it is also great stuff, just not as small of a particle as a dye.

I posted a link onto Trifern’s “2 Dye 4” entry that you’ll have to scroll down quite a ways to find. The link has good information on mixing aniline dyes. Just type in 2 Dye 4 into the search engine and it should pop right up.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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Howie

2656 posts in 2388 days


#9 posted 01-05-2011 02:47 PM

One other comment. What ever you use. If you are planning on mixing several different colors, go to the grocery store and buy a dozen 1/2 pint canning jars. Save the box(grid) label the lids with the color and the ratio of mix and you are all set with easy storage.

-- Life is good.

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Jonathan

2608 posts in 2516 days


#10 posted 01-05-2011 04:31 PM

Great idea on the organized storage, Howie. Keeps them all together and out of the dust so you don’t have to blow off the jar before opening it.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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happy_budah

132 posts in 3264 days


#11 posted 01-06-2011 04:38 PM

First thanks every one! i looked up Trifem and read his blog on “2 dye 4” i bought some powdered aniline dyes red, yellow, orange and black so now when they arrive i can play! as for the jars my mother inlaw ( i do lover her) has given me about 20 baby-food jars with the lids so im all set there. thanks again, Ill be looking in to mixol later after ive had time to play with the transtint.

-- the journy of a thousand miles begins with a single step " Lou-Tzu"

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