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Which Plane Combo for A to Z Finishing?

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Forum topic by amateur77 posted 07-30-2017 04:18 AM 686 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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amateur77

14 posts in 141 days


07-30-2017 04:18 AM

I’m looking to purchase several hand planes (used vintage record/stanley) to be able to tackle various projects and to be able to do 95% of the work with handtools

I currently got a £8 record no4 which I’m planing to convert to be a scrub plane (camber the blade/widen the mouth).

This is my plan so far:
- for the first step -rapid stock removal and general roughing up/shaping I will have the no4 record scrubber
-Than to start level everything properly I’m thinking about purchasing a no5 or no 5.5 jackplane?
- Than For jointing large pieces I’m looking to purchase a no7
-And finally I need something for smoothing out and finishing Like a no3 or no4? I’m not really sure what kind of plane would be the best for this step or even if I need a smaller plane if I will already have a no5? what would you suggest?

-Also I plan to purchase an old record/stanley no80 cabinet scraper to almost replace my sander with so I need to sand as little as possible.

I will be mostly using the handplanes to finish 3ft-7ft long boards.

What do you think about my plan? What should I change or add or remove from the list?
I would like to have as little tools as possible, but still have everything I need to do everything properly without faffing around.


20 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#1 posted 07-30-2017 04:51 AM

I use a no.4 for finish planing.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 07-30-2017 04:58 AM



I use a no.4 for finish planing.

- Loren

I’ll see your #4 and raise you a half.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1681 posts in 1733 days


#3 posted 07-30-2017 05:13 AM

That’s a good typical combo to have. A lot depends on the wood you’re using and the projects you do. It took me a couple years to figure out my go-to planes. I bought cheap vintage at first and restored them because I knew I didn’t know what I was going to ultimately need.

My milling planes (I don’t own a power planer or jointer):

Stanley 40 1/2 Scrub
L-N LA Jack for edge grain/shooting and also a toothed blade for finer scrub work (love the toothed blade on this thing)
L-N 4 1/2 with a 55 degree angle frog for crazy grain wood
Millers Falls No. 4 (or any brand #4, I love my MF.)
605 1/2 Bedrock
606 Bedrock
Stanley No. 8

Paul Sellers uses a 4 for almost anything, for example. I use an 8 on a lot of short pieces because of the mass. There is no ONE PROPER SET OF PLANES YOU MUST USE!

Again, these are the ones I enjoy most and my list doesn’t include any of my blocks or specialty planes, scrapers, etc. I also have multiple blades for my bench planes depending on grain. I’ve sold off more than I own now, after trying them out. I love buying planes but I don’t have space for collecting, so I only own users. You need to find the ones you enjoy most. I suggest buying vintage, or find someone who will let you try out some planes so you can customize for your needs.

Good luck and once you start down this road, you will never be able to get off it!

View Andre's profile

Andre

1495 posts in 1645 days


#4 posted 07-30-2017 05:14 AM

#4, Hi & Lo and standard sometimes the #3 for small jobs, Got a 5 1/4 for a jack. Never really found a need for a Scrub? Cabinet scraper and a Scraping plane take care of all final finish, well maybe a little chamfer with a LN 102?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5066 posts in 2104 days


#5 posted 07-30-2017 05:32 AM

#4, #7 and #60/12. But remember they are only as good as they are sharp. If they ain’t sharp , they ain’t worth
diddley squat!! In my book these 3 are the absolute minimum, least, anyone needs. My herd is growing all the time. There are other’s here who have scores of hand planes and way many more years of knowledge than I. Don W is probably the seinor leading expert on hand planes here, I suggest you defer to his judgment.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8328 posts in 1325 days


#6 posted 07-30-2017 06:38 AM

You nailed it for me. #2 for jewelry boxes & small stuff. #3 small panels. #4 panels. #4-1/2 big panels and tables.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View amateur77's profile

amateur77

14 posts in 141 days


#7 posted 07-30-2017 11:38 AM


#4, #7 and #60/12. But remember they are only as good as they are sharp. If they ain t sharp , they ain t worth
diddley squat!! In my book these 3 are the absolute minimum, least, anyone needs. My herd is growing all the time. There are other s here who have scores of hand planes and way many more years of knowledge than I. Don W is probably the seinor leading expert on hand planes here, I suggest you defer to his judgment.

- BurlyBob


Yes sir I’m aware of that, still learning the best ways to sharpen however Im getting there :)

View Tim's profile

Tim

3683 posts in 1800 days


#8 posted 07-30-2017 02:14 PM

Keep the #4 for a smoother at least until you get something else that can be made into a scrub type. You can take off a fair bit of wood without widening the mouth. Also a hatchet can work pretty well to really hog off wood.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1725 posts in 1868 days


#9 posted 07-30-2017 02:28 PM

Just curious… since I have only recently jumped into the “finishing” realm of shellac and dyes/stains and HVLP spray stuff, I thought hand planing smooth was not ideal for finishing due to the compacting of fibers, closing up pores, adhesion issues, etc?

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#10 posted 07-30-2017 02:31 PM

My basic collection is:
3,4, 5 1/2,7, 60 1/2.
Lots of others, but that’s my go-to set.
I have other irons both cambered and straight that are interchanged as needed.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Mario's profile

Mario

140 posts in 3235 days


#11 posted 07-30-2017 02:43 PM

A #4, #5Jack with an additional grooved blade, and a #7 Jointer, don´t care much about my scrub unless I am trying to square down rived lumber, can´t really find much use for it around the shop…..

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3936 days


#12 posted 07-31-2017 03:41 PM

Along the lines of the others.

Smoothing plane (#3-5 1/2) depending on what feels comfortable in your hand.
Rough Stock Removal with a Jack Plane, Fore Plane or Scrub plane (#5, #6 or #40)
Jointing (#7 or #8)
Finishing (Scraper or scraping plane #80, #12, or #112)

Block planes are useful. I prefer low angle adjustable mouth planes such as the (#60 1/2, or #65). Other adjustable mouth planes to consider are #9 1/2, #18 or #19. Non adjustable mouth would be a #220 or possibly a #102. How ever if you want a small block like the #102 I recommend you look at the Lie-Nielson.

Also consider Joinery planes such as a router plane and shoulder planes.

Rabbit Planes and grooving planes are also things to consider at some point.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8328 posts in 1325 days


#13 posted 07-31-2017 04:39 PM

Holbs, I’ve heard the same thing a bunch of times but have had 0 problems so far. Personally, a planed surface shines a bit more compared to sanded. The grain picture is clearer which I like.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Vindex's profile

Vindex

76 posts in 661 days


#14 posted 07-31-2017 04:46 PM

I think you can do just about anything with a #4, #5, #7, and a good block plane.

That’s what I have (though the #7 is new and still being tuned up). My block plane is a Millers Falls low angle 56 (equivalent to a Stanley 60 1/2). I like it because it fits my hand perfectly, and I like the adjustable mouth. However, some people might find the Stanley 60 1/2 too small. Block planes come in all sorts of configurations, and I have found that block plane preferences are more idiosyncratic than bench plane preferences.

If your #4 is in good shape, I would keep it and use it as a smoother, not a scrub plane. Your smoother needs to be your most precisely tuned plane, so if you have a good one already, don’t waste it!

Hope that helps!

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3936 days


#15 posted 07-31-2017 04:57 PM


My block plane is a Millers Falls low angle 56 (equivalent to a Stanley 60 1/2). I like it because it fits my hand perfectly, and I like the adjustable mouth. However, some people might find the Stanley 60 1/2 too small.

- Vindex

I agree. The 60 1/2 feels a bit small to me. For this reason, the #65 is my favorite block plane.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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