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Live Edge and Flying Shrapnel

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Forum topic by Thunderhorse posted 07-29-2017 03:11 AM 878 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


07-29-2017 03:11 AM

First go at live edge and I’m fairly pleased with the result. I have another that is almost identical….both came from odd chunks that were very thin on one side lending to either a very shallow platter or a live edge.

A little thick and chunky to be sure but not too bad.

And whoops…..I tend to leave my bowls thicker because of this. It had a chip in the rim and I thought about it a while before deciding to just take the edge down and boom! Fortunately, I was standing at the proper location, coming at it from the tailstock but straight in with a square carbide was NOT the best idea.

-- Fear is a Liar


13 replies so far

View Madrona's profile

Madrona

61 posts in 733 days


#1 posted 07-29-2017 05:38 AM

Nice looking grain and design. Aren’t natural edge bowls, fun? I love turning them. That brings up an issue I’ve had a hard time dealing with. If it has bark, I call it “live edge.” If the bark is gone but the irregular edge remains, I call it “natural edge.” I don’t suppose I’m either right or wrong, it’s just how I discern the difference.

You are going to remove the recess, aren’t you? It kind of detracts from the attractive grain on the bottom.

Sorry about the broken one, but it sure does happen to us all! :)

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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Hockey

90 posts in 250 days


#2 posted 07-29-2017 01:54 PM

Very nice bowl.

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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


#3 posted 07-29-2017 01:55 PM

I generally leave the recess on the bottom. It would probably look nicer with a smoother bottom but for now, I generally turn most of my bowls that way, giving me the ability to finish the bottom before flipping. I might double down on this and work on some more interesting designs on the recesses I use.

Blow ups happen. The most critical skill for a wood turner is patience, I believe, because so many things can be avoided and interesting things can be achieved with a little planning and foresight. I often get into a predicament where I realize I can do something by remounting a different way or using a different set of jaws and think “nah, that will take too long”....And this bowl paid the price.

I have a big one glued up no with some stone inlay. Crushed calcite crystal. I want to use turquoise but this was free out of the garden (made a mortar/pestle (sp?) from a cut off fire extinguisher and sledge head)So we shall see how that turns out.

-- Fear is a Liar

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1568 days


#4 posted 07-30-2017 03:26 PM

TH or Fearless?, it’s always a disappointment when you lose one. Look at what caused it and try to remedy that issue on the next piece so it doesn’t happen again. Great looking wood and nice looking shape for the one that survived but I will agree with the following;

.
You are going to remove the recess, aren t you? It kind of detracts from the attractive grain on the bottom. :)
- Madrona

A finished recess in my opinion is not attractive at all. The piece just looks unfinished. The bottom of the bowl should have the same care worked into it as the rest of the form. That’s my opinion only. I’m trying to be helpful.
I believe when you expand a piece of wood, and then start it rotating, centrifugal forces are working against you right away in causing this piece to come apart. It won’t happen every time, but it happens a lot more than when using a tenon. BTW, is that a tenon on the broken piece?? LOL.
If you have at least 1/2” – 3/4” thickness on the bottom of the broken piece, there is a fix. To see the fix, click on this link, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmgZG4xlFBw . I would not recommend using metal rod. had a bad experience with them, but wood is good and absolutely secure. It also adds a little character to the piece.
If you can’t do it, let’s collaborate. Send it to me, I’ll do the dowels, and then send it back to you to complete.. Whatdayathink about that? ................ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Thunderhorse's profile

Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


#5 posted 07-30-2017 05:38 PM

I appreciate the offer and the advice. I have frequently used a recess because its easier and I have trouble holding the finished end to turn off and finish the tenon. I do have a set of cole jaws and have made a couple flat rounds to fit in one of my chucks to mash up against but here again, gripping to finish it off is the issue.

That said, I did finish a vase this morning and used a tenon on the end. I need practice with it. I need practice with alot of things. (including photography)


Another large bowl:

That said, I don’t have that much invested in that busted bowl and its probably already in the scrap bin (nice thing about mesquite, it makes great grilling wood if I loose a piece. That and I have tons of it already cut and as much as I can go cut and load.

-- Fear is a Liar

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1568 days


#6 posted 07-30-2017 09:54 PM



I appreciate the offer and the advice. I have frequently used a recess because its easier and I have trouble holding the finished end to turn off and finish the tenon. I do have a set of cole jaws and have made a couple flat rounds to fit in one of my chucks to mash up against but here again, gripping to finish it off is the issue.
- Thunderhorse

Fearless, since you made that statement above, go to my website, www.woodturnerstools.com, and check out my videos of a tool I invented for removing tenons. Who knows, it might be the answer to safer tenon removals….

As far as photography goes, that’s an art in itself. One day, it will all come together and you’ll wonder why it took so long…...

Nice looking vahzz. Bowl too. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

460 posts in 1139 days


#7 posted 07-30-2017 10:37 PM

Good looking turnings.
Another option, usually for natural edge, for busted bowls is to drill and lace up the break with leather boot laces.
I suspect the broken one had a weak line to completely split in half. A gouge in sheer cut may have made it but going back to a thin edged is always a problem. More so with a scraper (carbide) because it sets up vibration almost immediately.
I turn most of mine with a recess but you can never see the recess. Whether recess or tenon always leave the dimple from the tailstock until the final removal.
Your pic of the broken bowl is how most of mine start, with a recess but a tenon left in the middle for re-centering.
You can then get rid of the evidence of a recess leaving a small rim for the bowl to set on and working the “tenon” down to about 1/8” which is removed and sanded when removed from the lathe. With this method you do not completed the bottom until the last thing and most folks use a friction chuck.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Thunderhorse's profile

Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


#8 posted 07-30-2017 11:19 PM

Alot to keep in mind.

I will try some of those saving techniques next time I have something worth saving. There wasn’t anything really special about that bowl but I have lost pieces that were much nicer.

I will check out the site. I kinda blew my budget on the lathe and a new chuck and various bits and pieces here and there. Wife is wrangling me into a craft fair in Sept or Oct. She has had a booth a few times (she sews) and taken a few of my pieces and sold them. Not looking to make it a business or anything but I make sawdust as therapy, so anything I make can go back into tools…..or helping raise two teenage daughters….

-- Fear is a Liar

View Thunderhorse's profile

Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


#9 posted 07-30-2017 11:21 PM

Ah, I don’t know if I went from here but I’ve seen your tools before. Both the spiky face plate deal and the tenon remover are pretty slick. Something to keep in mind.

-- Fear is a Liar

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

208 posts in 916 days


#10 posted 08-06-2017 09:19 PM



First go at live edge and I m fairly pleased with the result. I have another that is almost identical….both came from odd chunks that were very thin on one side lending to either a very shallow platter or a live edge.

A little thick and chunky to be sure but not too bad.

And whoops…..I tend to leave my bowls thicker because of this. It had a chip in the rim and I thought about it a while before deciding to just take the edge down and boom! Fortunately, I was standing at the proper location, coming at it from the tailstock but straight in with a square carbide was NOT the best idea.

- Thunderhorse

Glue it back together at the rim edge and call it art!

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#11 posted 08-06-2017 09:26 PM

To remove the tenon, either get Jerrys contraption, or just use a jam chuck and your tailstock… you got a lathe, so making the jam chuck is easy (and free :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1568 days


#12 posted 08-07-2017 03:31 PM



To remove the tenon, either get Jerrys contraption, or just use a jam chuck and your tailstock… you got a lathe, so making the jam chuck is easy (and free :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Contraption???? contraption - a contrivance or gadget; device that one does not fully understand.
That’s the Websters NewWorld Dictionary, Second College Edition.

Thanks Brad, that might just be the perfect description as most people who see it don’t understand it until they actually see it in person and see what it does…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#13 posted 08-07-2017 05:30 PM

LOL – Ok, gadget, gizmo, new-fangled invention, the future of woodturning, the single most important invention since the live center, etc… :)

I have full confidence that it will catch on…

It reminds me of a story back from the early days of personal computers… an innocuous little design change IBM did that wound up getting rave reviews and praise from all the then current magazines. What was this miracle of inventions that they incorporated? Well, the first generation of PC’s had their power supply in the back of the machine, and you had to reach around back to turn them on. What IBM did was mount a mechanical switch (not electrical) up in the front of the machine, and had a metal rod connect it to the actual electrical switch on the power supply in the back. No longer did you have to reach around the thing to turn it on! It took the industry by storm, and soon everyone was doing the same. They didn’t expect that however, and the designers, with somewhat of a sense of humor, even called it their “goldberg” rod – which hinted at its Rube Goldberg like nature, and went on to claim it stood for ”Generally operational linear digit controlled bi-phase electrical retardance gate” (IBM loves acronyms!).

So you never know <grin>

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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