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Refinishing Maple Dressers

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Forum topic by djrusselp posted 07-27-2017 07:37 PM 295 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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djrusselp

5 posts in 258 days


07-27-2017 07:37 PM

Hi everyone. Great community. It helped me a lot in refinishing an old Walnut desk recently.

This post is about a couple of Maple dressers I’m working on however. What’s the best way to finish them? I’d really like to use a Danish Oil with rub on poly, but I’ve heard it will blotch badly. I’ve also heard it won’t. Can someone share their insight? I’m wondering if I can use a slightly tinted Danish Oil. I’d like to finish it slightly darker than natural if possible. I can quite tell how it’s done now, but it’s darker than a natural hard maple in my opinion. They’re great pieces bought new in the ‘80s. Any advice? Thanks ahead of time!


5 replies so far

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Rich

1978 posts in 425 days


#1 posted 07-27-2017 08:15 PM

It’s difficult refinishing since you can’t do any test boards, but is there an area that doesn’t show that you can test on?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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djrusselp

5 posts in 258 days


#2 posted 07-27-2017 08:21 PM

Not really, but maybe low and towards the wall…

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Loren

9624 posts in 3484 days


#3 posted 07-27-2017 08:31 PM

By “darker” do you mean as in “browner”
or are you looking for amber color?

Several finishes add an amber tint to
pale woods like maple. Boiled linseed
oil, spar varnish, orange shellac
are three examples.

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djrusselp

5 posts in 258 days


#4 posted 07-27-2017 09:47 PM

Yes, amber is a good description and how I would describe it currently. Is that doable with minimal splotching or so foresee a problem there?

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Loren

9624 posts in 3484 days


#5 posted 07-27-2017 09:53 PM

Blotching is generally an issue with stains
on particular woods. Pine is a big villain
and some other woods don’t like to take
stain evenly.

None of the ambering finishes I mentioned
contain stain.

This may help you choose an approach:
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/turning-water-into-oil/

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