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Forum topic by metroplexchl posted 07-27-2017 03:20 AM 846 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


07-27-2017 03:20 AM

Hi there, I’m new here and am building a woodworking area on my soon-to-be enclosed back patio. I’m wondering how I should store the wood so that it doesn’t bow and twist in the intense north Texas heat and humidity. Surely everyone doesn’t keep their lumber stock air conditioned…. but again I’m new to woodworking! :-)

thanks in advance,

chris mccollum

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln


27 replies so far

View Drevo's profile

Drevo

8 posts in 719 days


#1 posted 07-27-2017 04:25 AM

I prefer storing wood horizontally, stickered and weighted , especially if it”s rough cut. If it’s dry and pre milled, you can store it vertically but my shop doesn’t really allow for it. You’ll have to either build a lumber rack or stack it on the floor. I’m sure you”ll get many opinions on this site on how to store your lumber. Welcome.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1695 posts in 2311 days


#2 posted 07-27-2017 11:29 AM

If the wood is dry, flat stack it. This keeps the gain/loss of moisture at a minimum. If kiln dried and not stored in a heated and cooled space (climate controlled), the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air and will equilibrate to about 12 – 15%. So, if it was kiln dried to 8%, this moisture gain is undesirable. If stored in a non climate controlled space, flat stack it so that there is no air flow and covering the stack with plastic will drastically slow and moisture gain.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1765 posts in 482 days


#3 posted 07-27-2017 11:44 AM

I store mine in the rafters. This arrangement has seen temperatures from 12° to 120° F. As mentioned above … stickered and weighted is key!
 

 
I store cut-offs at the base of a raised platform directly beneath the “lumber loft” ...
 

 
BUT … depending on what I’m working on at the time … I have lumber stored all over the place!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

212 posts in 1566 days


#4 posted 07-27-2017 04:53 PM

My workshop is in my basement (climate controlled) and that is where I store my lumber. I think you could probably keep large quantities outside (stickered and covered from rain), but when you want to use some it might not be a bad idea to bring what you need inside and let it acclimate for a couple weeks before milling it to final dimensions.

I’m no expert, so consider the source.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#5 posted 07-27-2017 10:24 PM



I prefer storing wood horizontally, stickered and weighted , especially if it”s rough cut. If it s dry and pre milled, you can store it vertically but my shop doesn t really allow for it. You ll have to either build a lumber rack or stack it on the floor. I m sure you”ll get many opinions on this site on how to store your lumber. Welcome.

- Drevo

Thank you sir! When you say “stickered”, i assume you put wood type, date purchased, dimensions?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#6 posted 07-27-2017 10:27 PM



If the wood is dry, flat stack it. This keeps the gain/loss of moisture at a minimum. If kiln dried and not stored in a heated and cooled space (climate controlled), the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air and will equilibrate to about 12 – 15%. So, if it was kiln dried to 8%, this moisture gain is undesirable. If stored in a non climate controlled space, flat stack it so that there is no air flow and covering the stack with plastic will drastically slow and moisture gain.

- WDHLT15

Thanks for the advice. I’m really new, so all my wood will come from big box stores until i learn more. Does Lowes and Home Despot kiln dry their lumber? I will advance eventually to rough cut stuff I think, but I don’t want to waste that beautiful wood on an unskilled woodworker!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#7 posted 07-27-2017 10:29 PM



My workshop is in my basement (climate controlled) and that is where I store my lumber. I think you could probably keep large quantities outside (stickered and covered from rain), but when you want to use some it might not be a bad idea to bring what you need inside and let it acclimate for a couple weeks before milling it to final dimensions.

I m no expert, so consider the source.

- Bill_Steele

What about in my garage? It’s certainly not climate controlled, but it would keep out the rain. It would get to ambient temps though…


-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#8 posted 07-27-2017 10:31 PM



I store mine in the rafters. This arrangement has seen temperatures from 12° to 120° F. As mentioned above … stickered and weighted is key!
 
I store cut-offs at the base of a raised platform directly beneath the “lumber loft” ...
 
BUT … depending on what I m working on at the time … I have lumber stored all over the place!

cool set up! If it gets 120 in that shed, wouldn’t those really long boards start to bow and sag?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View jonah's profile

jonah

1447 posts in 3133 days


#9 posted 07-27-2017 10:40 PM


Thank you sir! When you say “stickered”, i assume you put wood type, date purchased, dimensions?

- metroplexchl


No, you use wood “stickers” (little strips, basically) to stack the wood so it gets consistent airflow on all six sides. That equalizes any moisture gain and greatly mitigates warping.

The little wood strips in between the boards are the stickers. You line them up so air can flow in and around the boards.

I’d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You’ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it’ll warp. Stay far, far away.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

164 posts in 1469 days


#10 posted 07-27-2017 10:40 PM

Sticker in the wood means placing spacers between each layer of your wood pile. This allows air movement on all surfaces of each board and helps maintain even moisture content.

The stickers should all be the same size to ensure the boards remain flat and have less tenancy to warp, twist or cup. It’s also a good idea to add some weight to the top.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#11 posted 07-28-2017 12:47 AM


I d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it ll warp. Stay far, far away.

- jonah

Wow. I didn’t realize Home Despot wood was so awful. So I’ll google “hardwood lumber dealer dallas” and see what that gets me. If anyone knows any other good search words or actually know of some in the north texas (dallas and fort worth) areas, please let me know.

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#12 posted 07-28-2017 12:48 AM


No, you use wood “stickers” (little strips, basically) to stack the wood so it gets consistent airflow on all six sides. That equalizes any moisture gain and greatly mitigates warping.

- jonah

Do they have to sit for a certain amount of time or more specifically until the get to a certain moisture content?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View jonah's profile

jonah

1447 posts in 3133 days


#13 posted 07-28-2017 01:26 AM

That depends on how much moisture the wood has in it when you get it, how much moisture is in the air in your shop, and what you’re going to do with it.

Ideally you want somewhere between 6-9% moisture content, depending on the climate.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 139 days


#14 posted 07-28-2017 01:30 AM



That depends on how much moisture the wood has in it when you get it, how much moisture is in the air in your shop, and what you re going to do with it.

Ideally you want somewhere between 6-9% moisture content, depending on the climate.

- jonah

Good Lord. Why do all my hobbies end up being so expensive? This is gonna be AWESOME!!!! This is also going to be an education. Is there a woodworking basics video series you would recommend? I’m not sure if I put wood out in my back porch area that it could EVER get to 6-9% considering our sub-tropical climate.

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View Gantarris's profile (online now)

Gantarris

10 posts in 892 days


#15 posted 07-28-2017 04:57 AM


I d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it ll warp. Stay far, far away.

- jonah

Wow. I didn t realize Home Despot wood was so awful. So I ll google “hardwood lumber dealer dallas” and see what that gets me. If anyone knows any other good search words or actually know of some in the north texas (dallas and fort worth) areas, please let me know.

chris

- metroplexchl

I’ve bought some wood from both Central Hardwoods over in Carrolton and Hardwood Lumber Company off Goodnight lane in Dallas. You can also check out Woodcraft in Plano on West Plano Parkway over near 75 or one of the Rocklers in the area (one on Coit in Richardson, one on Preston in Frisco, and another just off I-30 near Beltline in Garland) though both places will be a bit more expensive than the lumber yards. You can also try Wood World over on TI boulevard, though I haven’t been there in quite a while. Hope that gives you a decent start on getting you some wood to start working on….

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