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Trying to figure out a lumber cart.

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Forum topic by totalrewind posted 07-25-2017 07:50 PM 526 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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totalrewind

38 posts in 2111 days


07-25-2017 07:50 PM

I’ve been working on a design for a lumber cart to organize extra materials cluttering up the shop.

The main design constraint is that I want it to be able to go outside, therefore I want it enclosed on all sides to help prevent rain damage and/or spiders.

Here are some drawings:


Size= 4’x10’ with a door on each end plus partitions dividing each section
Sheet goods sections are split: (48|72), (96|24), (96|24), (96|24)
lumber sections are split: (96|24), (96|24), (48|72), and the last is the full 120 for 10’ boards and pipes

Some design notes:
1) Notice the 2×4 attached to the base platform to raise the sides+top (can’t make a 4’ hole out of 4’ wood!)
2) The white strips on the floor of the sheet goods side are PVC pipe rollers/sliders.
3) I’d like to figure out some way of making the partitions out of pvc as well, but I don’t want it flimsy.
4) The doors will be weather stripped but will also have magnetic catches to minimize risk of kids or animals getting trapped inside.
5) Probably cover it with tar paper or tyvek for waterproofing.
6) The partitions for the sheet goods side are simple boards 1’ off the ground. I think this is enough?? (Again, not satisfied with the sheet goods partitions.)

All in all, I’m still not totally satisfied with the design, and would REALLY APPRECIATE any design improvements you could offer!


15 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 334 days


#1 posted 07-25-2017 07:59 PM

You might want to do some rough estimates on the fully loaded weight. My guess is you will need to make room onboard somewhere for a small block Chevy to move it once you fill it up.

Have you considered building a shed instead?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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firefighterontheside

16948 posts in 1695 days


#2 posted 07-25-2017 08:02 PM

Why is it on wheels? Will you roll it into your shop when needed? Im afraid it will lack strength and want to rack due to nothing keeping it square.
Think about using pipe of some kind for the layers instead of solid shelves.
You could consider using vinyl siding on the outsides. It could even make decent roof covering.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2477 days


#3 posted 07-25-2017 08:32 PM

Be sure to buy castors that are large enough (for rough surfaces) and high enough weight capacity.

I used castors with 6-inch forged steel wheels mounted on a yoke made of 1/4” thick steel – rated 1200lb each.

There’s a guy on ebay that specializes in castors. Mine are not crowned wheels. I understand that crowned wheels role more easily.

-Paul

[added] if there is any kind of slope, you’ll need to think carefully about the weight. Mine is not intended to leave the shop, just on wheels so I can move it to another place if needed.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27095 posts in 2177 days


#4 posted 07-26-2017 03:10 AM

I have no flat surface to roll on. But storage is always difficult to deal with.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2477 days


#5 posted 07-26-2017 01:50 PM

Actually, I’ve never moved mine after loading it up.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2966 posts in 551 days


#6 posted 07-26-2017 01:57 PM



You might want to do some rough estimates on the fully loaded weight. My guess is you will need to make room onboard somewhere for a small block Chevy to move it once you fill it up.

Have you considered building a shed instead?

- TungOil

if you want it to move must use 302 LMAO :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 334 days


#7 posted 07-26-2017 02:00 PM


if you want it to move must use 302 LMAO :<))

- GR8HUNTER

of course, but you want a lumber rack to move SLOWLY, hence the Chevy motor is the better choice (putting on flame suit…)

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#8 posted 07-26-2017 02:11 PM

totalrewind,

I took a stab at the rough loaded weight estimate suggested by TungOil. Based on my calculations I do not believe the lumber cart will be moved much. For example, with if loaded to half its volume (4’ x 4’ x 10’) with yellow poplar (38 pounds/cubic foot), the lumber alone would weigh about 1-1/2 tons. Additionally steering the cart if equipped with large diameter all swivel castors would be a bit like herding cats.

The only options I see for these two problems while keeping the cart mobile is to reduce the overall size of the cart or make two smaller carts, if this much storage is required. Mounting a pair of straight-line castors at one end would help with steering the cart.

For sheet goods storage, two bays may be enough especially with the PVC pipe standoffs on the floor of the plywood bays. Since I find that sheet good cutoffs accumulate quickly, one of the plywood bays could be divided vertically, perhaps the bottom bay a little taller than the upper bay. Also I assume the plywood storage bay is about 24” wide. This would accommodate up to 29 full size sheets of ¾” thick plywood; a lot of plywood. If you decide to downsize the cart, reducing the allocation to plywood storage could leave still leave you with plenty of sheet good storage.

I appreciate the desire to provide a means of escape for an otherwise trapped creature. However, I would be concerned that magnetic catches to keep the cart closed in the elements would fail when the wind blows. Magnetic catches of sufficient strength to overcome the resistance of the weather stripping and buffeting from the wind would also make it difficult for a small child or animal to escape. A more secure method for securing the doors closed is probably required.

You did not mention any ventilation. Even though the cart may keep water out, humidity could build up and harm the lumber. One solution would be to install louvered vents at each end of the cart. They would keep water out and allow air to enter. Applying window screen mesh to the vent opening would help keep insects outside the cart.

I too share firefighterontheside’s concern about racking with doors at each end. One way to stiffen the cart to resist racking would be to cantilever the base of the cart to one side and the install diagonal bracing from the cantilever to the upper edge of the side.

Since this cart will spend time in the elements, slopping the top to shed water like a roof, would go a long way to protecting the top and keep things dry inside the cart. You may be able to find an inexpensive flat roof material that could be applied to the top. In fact perhaps a friendly roofing contractor would have some scrap membrane that they would give or sell at a low cost.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2477 days


#9 posted 07-26-2017 02:12 PM

If you want it to move slowly, use an electric motor out of a Leaf or something. :-)

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2477 days


#10 posted 07-26-2017 02:14 PM

Or you could build a carport and use an open cart under cover.

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2477 days


#11 posted 07-26-2017 02:16 PM

You know, you might could just build it on a trailer frame like sold by Harbor Freight. Then hook it up to a vehicle to move it. ... but they are only rated up to 1700 lb.

https://www.harborfreight.com/1720-lb-capacity-48-in-x-96-in-super-duty-folding-trailer-62647.html

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 334 days


#12 posted 07-26-2017 02:42 PM

Have you considered a shed nearby your shop instead? In my township you can do a shed up to 100 sq. ft. without needing it anchored, so it can be a skid type that just sits on a bed of crushed stone. I bought one like this for my last house already made for just a few thousand$$$. That would get you 8’x12’, twice what you are looking for. with an end door and two permanent lumber racks, one on each side, you would get more storage in a structure that would be useful to a potential buyer should you ever decide to sell your house. something else to consider.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2966 posts in 551 days


#13 posted 07-26-2017 02:49 PM



Have you considered a shed nearby your shop instead? In my township you can do a shed up to 100 sq. ft. without needing it anchored, so it can be a skid type that just sits on a bed of crushed stone. I bought one like this for my last house already made for just a few thousand$$$. That would get you 8×12 , twice what you are looking for. with an end door and two permanent lumber racks, one on each side, you would get more storage in a structure that would be useful to a potential buyer should you ever decide to sell your house. something else to consider.

- TungOil

YES …then you can mover air compressor over …make your shop more quiet :<))

of course, but you want a lumber rack to move SLOWLY, hence the Chevy motor is the better choice (putting on flame suit…)

- TungOil

LMAO :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View totalrewind's profile

totalrewind

38 posts in 2111 days


#14 posted 07-26-2017 05:01 PM

Wow! Thanks to everybody for the great comments!

Why not a shed?
That was my first plan. I came up with the organizer to go inside it, but then I realized, “hey, I’m already building everything the way I want. All it needs is sides and a top!” That’s what led to this idea.

Plus, I admit I was a little influenced by all the youtube guys moving shops lately. (Come on, Izzy Swan, Diresta, AND Mike&Lauren!) Someday when the need arises, this would conceivably fit (unloaded, of course) in the back of a truck—much moreso than a whole entire shed!

firefighterontheside, great idea about the siding. I don’t know why that never occurred to me.

Also, I think many of the rest of you have talked me out of wheels. (Especially JBrow. That was really thorough!) I never had any epic journey in mind, I just wanted to be able to pull the thing away from the wall to give me more of a straight shot for getting things in and out. But now it sounds like it’d more trouble that it’s worth. I think instead I’ll just make sure the sheet goods side is on the outside and put it up on blocks. K.I.S.S, right?

As far as a roof, I’m not overly concerned. Since it isn’t a shed, I’m planning on putting the whole thing under a deck. Maybe though… I dunno. I mean, it may get a little water through the cracks, but definitely no snow to worry about. I guess I could be talked into it.

GR8HUNTER, I don’t know if you were joking, but I like the compressor idea. Just need to find a way to anchor it down so it doesn’t go silently into that good night. Literally. ;)

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Holbs

1725 posts in 1868 days


#15 posted 07-27-2017 12:57 AM

could use one of those dohicky’s that move trailers: triangular movable pivot jack thingy. We used those to move A-10 aircraft (which I think is more than a ton!) during exercises to simulate no electric winch power.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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