LumberJocks

How would you repair this tote? (esp Don W.)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Ocelot posted 07-24-2017 08:45 PM 1508 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2472 days


07-24-2017 08:45 PM

This is on a No 8, type 10 which otherwise is a very nice plane.

I’m thinking I need to get the nails out somehow or drill the heads off them, then do a standard glue job and fill the holes. Any suggestions on how to do that?

Thanks,
-Paul


32 replies so far

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1701 posts in 2847 days


#1 posted 07-24-2017 09:00 PM

How about just remaking a new one?

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2472 days


#2 posted 07-24-2017 09:01 PM


How about just remaking a new one?

- tyvekboy

I like to retain the 100-year-old rosewood…. to keep the tool as original as possible.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1701 posts in 2847 days


#3 posted 07-24-2017 09:07 PM

Oh. Getting the nails out might be a problem. If you can pry the pieces apart you might be able to pound the nails out enough to grip the heads and pull them out. Then try and glue back to gather again. Use the bold that holds in to the plane as a clamp.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Loren's profile

Loren

9608 posts in 3482 days


#4 posted 07-24-2017 09:08 PM

I think if I were undertaking it I’d accept
that I was going to do some more damage,
pry the broken part off and tap the nails
out from the pointy side. Hopefully they
are short.

Once the nails are out… well, that’s rosewood
I think and it doesn’t glue well because of
oils in the wood. You’ll have to soak the
glue surfaces in acetone. Brushing the solvent
on may be adequate. I know this is needed
to glue with PVA but with epoxy it may not
be needed.

Considering after removal and pounding the
nails out there may be substantial gaps that
prevent a good bond with PVA, I would use
an epoxy.

Good luck. If it’s any consolation, I have a
few planes with that part broken off and
they work fine. It’s the weakest point in
a Bailey bench plane by far.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2472 days


#5 posted 07-24-2017 09:20 PM

Thanks for your comments Loren,

I appreciate you taking the time to consider my problem.

I’d rather not try to pry it, since that would bugger up the joint. I’d save that for a last resort.

Yeah, I have others without a horn. This is the first one with a broken horn that I actually have the part that broke off, so I like to fix it if I can.

Strange what you say about gluing Rosewood. I’ve used Titebond 3 for other plane knobs and totes and none have failed yet, but maybe I just haven’t used them enough.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

550 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 07-24-2017 09:37 PM

I fixed one using Titebond III the first time. It lasted about a 1.5 then separated at the glue line. The glue pretty much flaked off at that point.

I ended up doing as Loren described. I cleaned it up good with a wire brush first wiped down good with some acetone then wire brushed it again. I then put a temporary bolt/nut through it to get it all strait then drilled two small holes for dowels (mine was snapped at the bottom). I used Devcon 30 minute epoxy for glue and wood pin installation. Will see how it holds up as only been about 4 months now.

I have one with a broken horn and actually think I like the handle better as my thumb sets in a little groove across the bolt head compared to my other stanley handles.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14843 posts in 2453 days


#7 posted 07-24-2017 09:48 PM

Don W is the master. Fixed the tote on my #62 and it was in four pieces. Is the repair a solid one? If so, add some epoxy and sand smooth.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2472 days


#8 posted 07-24-2017 09:53 PM

Maybe that would be best – just color the epoxy to sorta match.

I’m holding out for a repair that get’s the nails out though. No hurry to do anything. I’ve got 2 No 8’s! :-)

I’m still hoping Don W will comment.


Don W is the master. Fixed the tote on my #62 and it was in four pieces. Is the repair a solid one? If so, add some epoxy and sand smooth.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop


View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 775 days


#9 posted 07-24-2017 09:58 PM

Use a small drill bit to drill alongside the nail. Remove the top piece and then snip the nail off. Then bond the two pieces back together and fill any voids.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2778 days


#10 posted 07-25-2017 01:28 AM

You can jury rig your shop vac to suck the glue in.

To get a nail out, I’ve used a small pipe and ground very amateurish teeth on the end, then ran it over the nail. You may be able to limit to a quart inch deep, clamp with needle nose vice grips, then hammer the grips backwards (may need a second pair of grips).

When ready to put it all back together, I’d go with epoxy, since it’ll fill too.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#11 posted 07-25-2017 12:54 PM

Maybe you can use a small punch and push the nail a little further in so that you can just pull the top off the rest of the way. That would leave the nail head exposed enough that you can grab it and pull it out. Then, you could use the nail hole as a guild to drill a larger hole for a dowel to reinforce it when you glue it back on.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116561 posts in 3411 days


#12 posted 07-25-2017 01:44 PM

Hi Paul

How about just remaking a new one?

- tyvekboy

I like to retain the 100-year-old rosewood…. to keep the tool as original as possible.
- Ocelot

I really don’t see the point of saving it, if it’s a matter of its collectible value collectors don’t want planes with broken or patched totes anyway.as a user, a new tote is much more reliable.
Since you have saved other totes I’m guessing you’re going to repair this one some how.Loren’s suggestion seems like the way to go to minimize more damage if done carefully. the only other way to remove nails I can think of is to use one of these hollow drill saws that are typically used to remove broken screws.

http://www.oahurealty.net/blog/remove-broken-wood-screws.html

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2472 days


#13 posted 07-25-2017 01:52 PM


Hi Paul

I really don t see the point of saving it, if it s a matter of its collectible value collectors don t want planes with broken or patched totes anyway.

- a1Jim

Well, Jim. I’m the collector, and I like the old repaired rosewood! :-) I’m never going to sell it. I don’t care how many dollars I could exchange it for.

-Paul

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116561 posts in 3411 days


#14 posted 07-25-2017 02:03 PM

I guess everyone has their own Idea about preservation, I hope it works out what ever you do Paul.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View putty's profile

putty

1158 posts in 1441 days


#15 posted 07-25-2017 02:05 PM

Just get a donor plane and swap it out

-- Putty

showing 1 through 15 of 32 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com