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Please Help me identify wood on knife handle

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Forum topic by WoodGuy503 posted 07-24-2017 04:54 AM 403 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodGuy503

3 posts in 147 days


07-24-2017 04:54 AM

What kind of wood is this? Thanks!


6 replies so far

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msinc

108 posts in 343 days


#1 posted 07-24-2017 01:39 PM

Need a closer up picture to see the actual grain…that is burl taken from a “lump” or ball on a limb or tree trunk. Honestly could be many different types of wood. Custom knife makers, custom call makers and pistol grip makers use it a lot. Whatever species of wood it is sometimes hard to find a good burl and that makes it sort of rare. About the most common is wild black cherry and oak. I don’t believe that is either one of those.
Do you know where the knife was made??? Sometimes the area will clue you in to the type of wood, but not always…the maker can and will have the blanks shipped in.

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WoodGuy503

3 posts in 147 days


#2 posted 07-25-2017 01:35 AM

I actually made it in a knife making class but can’t remember what wood they gave me. It was in Oregon and I believe it’s from somewhere on the west coast maybe California. I could be wrong though. Thanks for the response!

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msinc

108 posts in 343 days


#3 posted 07-25-2017 12:35 PM

Nice knife, I like it, and good job putting it together and finishing it too. The black line thru the middle is referred to as “spalting” which is more of an age thing, not species. Several different woods will “spalt” as they dry out and begin to age, maple being one of the most common. Not all woods do it though and not all trees get “burls” on them either. I am guessing that you didn’t stain the wood??? If not, the color is about right for myrtle, which is found out that way. It also is colored about right for English walnut. But I am not sure if either one of those will “burl” up. Never seen one do it. Honestly, it could be anything, when you get burl wood and fresh cut it on a bandsaw it all looks about the same…the only ones I can really tell for certain when it is rough cut is white oak and cherry. Pretty much anything else can look real similar after it is finished, especially if stain was applied to make it look like something else.

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Dan

645 posts in 1732 days


#4 posted 07-25-2017 12:51 PM

It somewhat looks like these. Stabilized slightly colored spalted maple from AntlersExpress in Lebanon, Oregon. He sells high quality wood on Ebay. The color on my picture is off a little. It is actually closer to the color of your knife.

-- Peace on Earth

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WoodGuy503

3 posts in 147 days


#5 posted 07-26-2017 02:14 AM

Hey thanks that looks like it might be it or close enough to order and use in a new knife. I forgot I put a filter on that photo. I just sanded it no stain. Here’s an unedited pic. Really appreciate the response guys.

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msinc

108 posts in 343 days


#6 posted 07-27-2017 01:50 PM

It very well could be maple. One thing to watch out for when dealing with spalted maple is that the grain can be very small and burly, as the examples pictured by DanielP or it can be very large grained and the burl much more open. If you are trying to match this look you had best make sure you see the actual pieces you are getting. Ebay is a good source of this stuff…but not everyone sends what they have pictured in the auction. Make sure you at least ask if this is the actual piece you are buying.

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