LumberJocks

How to make a raised panel drawer front?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Angela posted 12-30-2010 08:37 AM 14419 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Angela's profile

Angela

205 posts in 2357 days


12-30-2010 08:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: drawers drawer construction

I’m trying to locate information about making a raised panel drawer front. Not Doors, Drawers. I see MLCS has a special router bit called “Mitered Drawer Frame Router Bit ” – This new, smaller sized, 2 flute, carbide tipped bit can be used to make matching profile drawer frames or to make smaller sized doors, using 1-1/2” wide stock.
I was wondering what other opinions are out there or what others have done. I attached some example of what I’m looking for.

Thanks
Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's


4 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#1 posted 12-30-2010 08:41 PM

Hi Angela—

I’m assuming we’re in the kitchen here.

In my experience drawer fronts are usually solid stock with a matching outside profile routed in. Obviously you can’t get a top drawer of say, 6” height to make any sense as a five piece. Then you get to larger drawers and they start looking awkward with vertical grain in the panels that are way wider than they are high. It’s enough contrary to the look of the doors that it is disturbing.

The impression from 5 piece doors is usually a function of the uppers, so my counsel is to do solid stock drawer fronts for the lowers and know you’re in good company.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 2731 days


#2 posted 12-30-2010 08:56 PM

The router bits for these kind of profiles are typically called cabinet bits (rail and stile)...the ones for larger doors are suitably labeled door bits (rail and stile). I have seen offerings from all the bit mfg’s….and there are even some that offer miniature ones for making small drawers. You just need to make sure you read all the data as typically these bits are made to handle certain thicknesses of stock….Some are also adjustable so that you can customize the thickness and profiles. The raised panel bits can also have undercutters that allow you to make the pieces flush…..

You can also use a profile bit like a beaded or roman ogee…..then use a slotter to groove for your panel….and a Table saw with a jig to make the raised panel….I did this when I did not have a decent router table….now that I do have a good table….I just use the matching router bit sets.

That said…I have seen several examples of what Lee says above. I have seen some cabinet shops that make the drawer front profiles from one piece as he mentions…some also make a thinnner version and attach as a false front to mdf or ply drawer fronts.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View Angela's profile

Angela

205 posts in 2357 days


#3 posted 12-31-2010 12:55 AM

Thanks for your replies. Actually it’s not for the kitchen. It’s going to be just drawers on a cabinet. Two long drawers then two smaller ones side by side. I have a router table and have done the rail and stile before but not the raised panel doors. I was worried that the bits used for the doors would be too large for the drawer fronts.

I’ll try to look again but I couldn’t find any miniature one for making small drawers. I like the idea of a Roman Ogee bit and a Slotter bit.

My bath room has some raise panel drawer fronts. They have miter corners then the middle part was added, I thought I’d do something like that.

Thanks again
Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 2731 days


#4 posted 01-01-2011 08:38 PM

Also, I forgot to mention that Woodhaven has a great template/jig for making one piece (mdf or ply) drawer and door panels. It is a bit pricey but the Woodhaven jigs are made in the USA and are very well engineered. Right now they are offering free shipping and some discounts on various jigs ( I do not know if the drawer or door template is one of them – but you can check them out or keep an eye out for a sale here Woodhaven).

I have one of their other products – coping sled – and I am seriously considering a couple of their other jigs to purchase when needed – I use my coping sled alot and always get very consistent/accurate cuts every time. I purchased their sled (after alot of research and some very satisfied customer referrals) as it is heavy duty (so it doesn’t deform when clamping) and the quality is superb.

You can find several excellent reviews of their products here on LJ’s. I am not affiliated with them in anyway other then a satisfied customer.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com