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Design Help: edging plywood

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Forum topic by DragonLady posted 12-30-2010 01:19 AM 5630 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DragonLady

298 posts in 2471 days


12-30-2010 01:19 AM

I’m trying to plan out my next shop project, which will be a rolling cabinet to put my drill press on. I’d like to learn how to edge plywood with solid wood, and I’m having some issues.

Putting the edging around the front edges of the cabinet seems pretty straightforward, but I’m at a loss as to how to edge the exposed plywood on the back (or sides, depending on how I attach the back of the cabinet). I’d prefer the edging to be flush with the plywood, not a “frame” that is tacked on afterwards.

Any hints, or can anyone point me to a good resource on how to make plywood cabinets that will be seen from all sides?

Also, how should I handle the edges of the drawer fronts?

EDIT: found the best picture I could, red circle is what I’m trying to accomplish:

How do I do that? Doesn’t have to be both sides.

-- A woman's work is never done-but power tools help!


11 replies so far

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2447 days


#1 posted 12-30-2010 01:39 AM

Size your panels to include the hardwood edging wrapping around the panels. Another method is to make a molding to wrap 2 sides in one piece. Which was what I did on my table saw cabinet.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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DragonLady

298 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 12-30-2010 01:41 AM

So basically add the edging, then just mill and assemble as if it were a solid piece?

-- A woman's work is never done-but power tools help!

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#3 posted 12-30-2010 01:52 AM

theoretically you would only have the front and (back) to edge if you are mitering the box. or front + back, and all around the top if you don’t. I would not be worried about the back if I were you, but if it’s for practice – go for it. use the same technique for the back as you do for the front – same concept just twice the work.

the easiest method to attach the edge is to groove the plywood in the center, and rabbet the edging on both sides so that it fits into the plywood like (tongue and groove) that way you have full contact, plus the strength of the mechanical fit which helps in both holding it in place, keeping it in place, and keeping it aligned.

As for drawer fronts – either use solid wood for those, or leave them as is. edging those if they are made of plywood will require you to either miter the edging and cut to fit each piece for a perfect fit, or frame it. not sure it’s worth the hassle – making the drawer front solid wood (especially for smaller pieces) would probably be easier and look better.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 12-30-2010 01:58 AM

I’m working on a tool cabinet for under my workbench right now and it calls for a technique similar to what you’re asking for. I believe it is a ShopNotes/PlansNow plan.

Basically, the solid wood edging is attached by 1/8” splines. For the side panels, the edging is grooved on two faces, so it actually connects the top/bottom to the side. Basically same thing as thinking of it as a solid piece, but in this case, the edging is grooved on all necessary sides prior to attaching it to the plywood.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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whit

246 posts in 3441 days


#5 posted 12-30-2010 02:12 AM

Glue the trim on and then flush-trim the edges.

http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip021220ws.html
http://www.shopnotes.com/files/issues/sample/sample-18-19.pdf
http://www.woodsmithshop.com/download/409/flush-trim-jig.pdf

Whit

-- Even if to be nothing more than a bad example, everything serves a purpose. cippotus

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jack1

2057 posts in 3491 days


#6 posted 12-30-2010 03:15 AM

You’ll be pleased with this treatment when you are done. It’s easier than you think. Practice on scrap first.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3201 days


#7 posted 12-30-2010 04:20 AM

Here are two link that sell plywood edge bits where you will be able to get it p;erfect every time. I use the Burgess bits, but the other types will work just fine also.

http://www.holbren.com/edge-banding/

http://www.burgessedge.com/bits.html

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View DragonLady's profile

DragonLady

298 posts in 2471 days


#8 posted 12-30-2010 06:28 AM

Ok, maybe I didn’t explain myself too clearly?

The part that is giving me fits is the outside corner where the back meets the sides. How do I do solid wood edging on that part?

I’d like the top to overhang on all sides, so that will be done separately, and I don’t have an issue with that part.

If I recess the back into the cabinet, then I’d have the edges on all the sides showing, right? Ok, so how do I add edging that sits flush with the back panel? I don’t want a raised trim look.

Just adding the edging to the front of the cabinet is not going to be a problem, because there’s no panel in the middle. I just have to flush trim the edging with the plywood sides and bottom. No biggie.

I think I’m confusing myself, and I have a feeling there’s something super simple that I’m just not grasping here. And I can’t find a picture of what I’m trying to do.

-- A woman's work is never done-but power tools help!

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DragonLady

298 posts in 2471 days


#9 posted 12-30-2010 06:52 AM

live4ever, I just went back and re-read your post. The solid wood being the attachment point for the plywood seems like the best match to what the picture I just posted above is.

Do you know what plan that is?

-- A woman's work is never done-but power tools help!

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2447 days


#10 posted 01-02-2011 09:05 PM

This is what I have done on my table saw cabinet. What I did was to set up my dado set to cut the rabbet first. After I made enough of the rabbets I then changed back to a regular blade and then cut it free creating the molding I wanted. It does require the cut side to be sanded smooth. Thus I then had my V shape molding to apply to the cabinet.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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live4ever

983 posts in 2474 days


#11 posted 01-02-2011 09:41 PM

Hi DragonLady,

You can certainly get the plan if you want – it is available on PlansNow and is called “European Workbench Cabinet”. It is from Woodsmith no. 50.

Basically, all you are doing is grooving the edging on two faces, and making matching grooves on the edge of your plywood panels. Probably the simplest way to accomplish this for both the edging pieces as well as the plywood panels is with a slot-cutter router bit. Then you just fit in splines of the appropriate thickness. Of course, this doesn’t help you if you don’t have a slot-cutter bit.

Alternatively, you could use the kerf of your TS blade. That is fine for the edging, but would require you to run your panels on edge over the TS blade – not recommended without the proper tall auxiliary fence.

Another alternative is to use a 1/8” router bit in a router table. Also fine for the edging pieces, but gets dicey when trying to rout the plywood panels on edge – again, you need a GOOD tall aux. fence to do this safely.

Finally, yet another way to do the same thing would be with biscuits if you have a biscuit joiner.

It’s all the same principle – you’re just adding structural integrity with splines or biscuits on two 90 degree faces of the edging.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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