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Forum topic by Tony Ennis posted 07-19-2017 02:37 PM 1107 views 1 time favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tony Ennis

128 posts in 2976 days


07-19-2017 02:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sharpening

The first obvious difference between me and the fine woodworkers I watch on youtube is that their tools are really sharp. I have never been able to sharpen tools to that level. In fact, mine are barely serviceable, I think.

There is a chance that the first generation diamond stones I bought 30 years ago are worn out or were never any good to begin with.

So, recommend to me sizes, grits, and brands of diamond stones.

I want to sharpen chisels and plane irons up to 2 3/8” (Stanley #8 jointer plane).

-- Tony


33 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1835 days


#1 posted 07-19-2017 02:49 PM

Sharpening is hard, at least until you get the trick of it.

I have a dmt 10×4” coarse stone that I use for stuff that needs some aggressive work. I wish I would have gone extra coarse. I went with the 10×4 because it is also great at flattening 8×3 waterstones.

I also have an 8×3 fine dmt stone which I use as the first step in sharpening for normal use. After that I go to an 8k grit Norton waterstone. I actually got the 4k/8k combo, but I rarely use the 4k side.

After that I will strop.

Sharpening supplies.com has pretty good deals from time to time. That is where I got my stuff.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7532 posts in 1990 days


#2 posted 07-19-2017 03:00 PM

Any particular reason you are set on diamond stones? There’s more options that may work better for you. I’ve switched to ceramic water stones and can’t be happier.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8036 posts in 2417 days


#3 posted 07-19-2017 03:12 PM

Atoma diamond stones work well for me.

Then I like to use water stones and stropping to get a sharp edge.

Like bbasiaga states “Sharpening is hard, at least until you get the trick of it.”

For me that meant using a sharpening jig:

https://vsctools.com/shop/ultimate-sharpening-jig/

View Loren's profile

Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#4 posted 07-19-2017 03:13 PM

Your old diamond stones may be clogged.
Soaking in soapy water and scrubbing
with a nylon brush may restore performance.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1835 days


#5 posted 07-19-2017 04:20 PM



Atoma diamond stones work well for me.

Then I like to use water stones and stropping to get a sharp edge.

Like bbasiaga states “Sharpening is hard, at least until you get the trick of it.”

For me that meant using a sharpening jig:

https://vsctools.com/shop/ultimate-sharpening-jig/

- waho6o9

Me too. I use the LV jig, and I also have a cheapie jig that works pretty well still. I just got a Japanese style chisel that is tapered in every direction and I can’t get it to sit well in any of the jigs….I’m going to have to figure out how to hand sharpen it. :o

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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waho6o9

8036 posts in 2417 days


#6 posted 07-19-2017 04:25 PM

Maybe adhere sandpaper to the jig or double sided tape.

View Tony Ennis's profile

Tony Ennis

128 posts in 2976 days


#7 posted 07-19-2017 04:41 PM

Not really, except I would like to avoid a mess.


Any particular reason you are set on diamond stones? There s more options that may work better for you. I ve switched to ceramic water stones and can t be happier.

- jmartel


-- Tony

View JayT's profile

JayT

5455 posts in 2051 days


#8 posted 07-19-2017 04:51 PM

All the sharpening systems work and all have pros and cons, you just need to match your working style to the proper system to take advantage of its benefits and minimize the negatives. If you’ve decided that diamond is the way to go, then have at it. The lack of mess is one good reason to stick with that system, IMHO.

I use EZE-Lap Diamond plates (Coarse, Medium & Extra-Fine) and follow up with a strop and it works well for my space and work flow. I would agree with Loren to first try a good cleaning on your current plates to see if they are just clogged before spending to purchase others. If you do end up needing to purchase, then the 8×3 size is the smallest I would recommend for your stated needs. You could go longer &/or wider if you wish, I just wouldn’t go smaller.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#9 posted 07-19-2017 07:17 PM

What Loren said

This video shows it.

https://youtu.be/vXqTPKqM_JY

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4414 posts in 3582 days


#10 posted 07-19-2017 07:49 PM

Stones can and do wear…
Before I would chuck it…. I would see if there is someone that has a plate that they own that they really like, and would let you try it out… and/or… let them try your stone.

That way you can confirm if it is technique or the stone sucks.;

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4497 posts in 3083 days


#11 posted 07-20-2017 05:01 PM

Diamond is great for putting a final edge on a blade, but not so good for removing a lot of material. Diamond stones will get clogged with steel bits. When that happens, they stop cutting. Diamond grit is “non-friable”; that is the grit doesn’t wear down like ceramic grit does. When a diamond stone stops working, you have to wash it with soap and water to restore it to sharpening condition.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

514 posts in 588 days


#12 posted 07-20-2017 06:42 PM

I’ve been using diamond plates for at least 10 years. One thing I like is that they DO remove metal fast, of course you need the proper grit. I use, in order, a medium grit, then an extra fine, then a short session on a Black Arkansas, then strop it. If I just touch up the edge before it gets too dull, I never need the medium grit.

I don’t think a diamond plate clogs like a stone will. I just wipe it with a damp cloth every now and then. When I’m finished I use soap and water on it., dry it, and put it away.

Diamond plates are fast. That’s a real advantage to me. Not messy either. Never need resurfacing. Don’t need to soak em in water. What’s not to like? I hate sharpening, so I want to get to it, do it, and get back to the woodworking.

View OSU55's profile (online now)

OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#13 posted 07-20-2017 07:25 PM

Heres my honing process for plane blades and chisels.. Diamond stones are more for creating bevels and maybe the 1st honing step. While a 9u diamond edge will appear and act sharp, it wont last as long as an actual polished edge.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

514 posts in 588 days


#14 posted 07-20-2017 09:38 PM

Well, we can offer opinions about this forever. I don’t pretend to be the superstar of sharpening, and I sure don’t consider it anything special. I just want sharp tools. There are degrees of what folks want in terms of a sharp edge, and some want all that is possible. I just want a good sharp edge that will hold up under use. I used to labor over sharpening, and I hated it. Then I took a hand tool woodworking course, and they used diamond plates and were back to woodworking very very quickly. I was amazed. I bought what they used and I’ve been happy for years. Only recently have I added the hard black Arkansas stone to my process, then the honing with jeweler’s rouge. It’s pretty fast, and I like the results.

I don’t want to use sandpaper, or a semi-liquid paste, or water stones. I want fast and effective, and diamond plates get me that.

But..that’s just me…

Kirk

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#15 posted 07-20-2017 09:45 PM

The more I read the the more I’m thinking about diamond plates. Any place in particular I should be look for/at these.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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