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Forum topic by crowlader posted 07-18-2017 05:58 PM 1038 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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crowlader

21 posts in 151 days


07-18-2017 05:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing nailer nailer angled straight finish beginner question

I am new to this forum and did some research here before I asked this to be sure that I was not repeating something already done, and to the best of my knowledge I don’t think this has been brought up.

I make and sell some furniture for some extra money and lately I have been having to rent a finishing nailer from home depot and I’m sick of spending the money to do so, so I just bought an air compressor and now need to decide on the correct gun. On all the other threads relating to this people only discussed their use of finishing nailers for running boards, crown molding etc. My use of the nailer will be for herringbone headboards, side tables, end tables etc. Should I buy an angled or straight finishing nailer… or a different type all together. Thank you for you help in this and I’m excited to be a part of the community.

-- Conner, Georgia


39 replies so far

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

203 posts in 354 days


#1 posted 07-18-2017 06:09 PM

I have an 18 ga hitachi. its awesome for the limited use that I actually do use it. I typically don’t fire too many nails in my furniture pieces, but when there is a need then I definitely do it.

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2814 days


#2 posted 07-18-2017 06:17 PM

Aren’t the angled finish nailers heavier/thicker gauge nails? So, type would depend on need.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#3 posted 07-18-2017 06:33 PM

For furniture I mostly use an 18 ga. nailer
and a micro-pinner that shoots 23 ga. nails.

For carpentry I have a 15 ga. Hitachi angled
nailer but I rarely use that in the shop unless
I’m building a jig with it or something like
that. It’s just kind of overkill for most
shop woodworking where things are glued
together. When using glue 18 ga. nails
hold parts in place quite well.

A 1/4” crown stapler is most useful in the
shop. The tines of the staples tend to fan
out when fired so there’s a bit of a dovetail
effect that makes for strong holding. I
use that for cabinet backs, making plywood
boxes, shop drawers and jigs.

I’ve read reports that the Harbor Freight
18 ga. nailers work well, hold up, and they
are pretty cheap.

In terms of name brands the ones I have
used are Hitachi, Bostitch and Porter Cable.
All work well. There are weight and kickback
differences with the heavier nailers and some
have convenience features like air blowers
and quick-clearing noses for jams. I’ve never
had many issues with nailer jamming however.
I think nailer design is pretty much mature
at this point and all the brands are reliable.

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

7530 posts in 1989 days


#4 posted 07-18-2017 07:14 PM

Harbor Freight. Their air nailers are actually quite good and only like $20. Just put a couple drops of air tool oil in the coupling before you connect the hose to help it run smoothly.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

408 posts in 579 days


#5 posted 07-18-2017 07:22 PM



Harbor Freight. Their air nailers are actually quite good and only like $20. Just put a couple drops of air tool oil in the coupling before you connect the hose to help it run smoothly.

- jmartel

Bingo. Just picked up a crown stapler from them a few weeks back. Wondering how I got along with out one for so long. Love it!

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#6 posted 07-18-2017 07:27 PM

I use my 18 gauge most often, but mostly for jigs and fixtures.
A 23 gauge pin nailer is handy for small or delicate trim. I use the pinner to secure glass stops on doors.

Both of mine are Porter Cable. I have not been happy with Bostitch or HF guns.
Very satisfied with P.C. nailers. I currently have 5 of them.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#7 posted 07-18-2017 07:39 PM

PC 16 and 18 ga. here. Have a 23 as well.
My Pcs are old models made in Jackson, TN.
Have done 3 homes with them over 15 yrs. Rebuild for all the gaskets etc.
Well oiled, and I can’t complain.
PC pancake comp. that is still working as new.
Remember that I said old stock made in US.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

324 posts in 1839 days


#8 posted 07-18-2017 07:39 PM

I’ll vouch for the harbor freight brad nailer. I use it for trim and tacking things together while the glue dries. Very inexpensive, and it even came with a second plunger but the first ones seems to be holding up just fine so far. I imagine I would laughed out the door in a professional shop, but for what I do it’s perfect.

-- Ted

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

989 posts in 2814 days


#9 posted 07-18-2017 08:03 PM

My 18 ga finish nailer and framing nailer are Paslode brand and probably 20 yrs old. I recently did a rebuild on them using kits I ordered online.

I purchased HF wide and crown staplers. The wide stapler had a horrible misfire. The crown works great except if held too far upside down, the safety nose piece doesn’t engage sometime. Of course, I bought it to staple strips of luan on my ceiling to cover OSB seams.

I picked up a PC wide stapler and 18ga brad nailer. Both of those work great.

View crowlader's profile

crowlader

21 posts in 151 days


#10 posted 07-18-2017 08:21 PM



Aren t the angled finish nailers heavier/thicker gauge nails? So, type would depend on need.

- hotbyte

You’re right, they are heavier gauge. I guess I was asking for opinions on what I need. Essentially I would hold the wood down with the nail while the glue dries.

-- Conner, Georgia

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2814 days


#11 posted 07-18-2017 08:30 PM

A 23ga pin nailer might do you, then. If you need larger nails than that to hold while glue dries, clamps or other means of holding might be best.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1053 days


#12 posted 07-18-2017 08:41 PM

WEN from Amazon similar to the HFreight

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1035 posts in 2600 days


#13 posted 07-18-2017 11:00 PM

Another plus for the Harbor Freight pin nailer!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1308 days


#14 posted 07-19-2017 12:23 AM



A 23ga pin nailer might do you, then. If you need larger nails than that to hold while glue dries, clamps or other means of holding might be best.

- hotbyte

I agree with this in theory but my advice would be an 18ga narrow crown stapler for two reasons:

1. The 23ga pins are actually pretty spendy. And 23-ga pinners themselves are really costly for decent quality. The Grex P650L is $290-$300, for example.

2. A 18-ga narrow crown stapler does double-duty because it can be used to tack things together for gluing, but is also very handy when doing things like stapling 1/4” ply to the back of a cabinet or book shelf for example.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#15 posted 07-19-2017 12:48 AM


I agree with this in theory but my advice would be an 18ga narrow crown stapler for two reasons:

1. The 23ga pins are actually pretty spendy. And 23-ga pinners themselves are really costly for decent quality. The Grex P650L is $290-$300, for example.

2. A 18-ga narrow crown stapler does double-duty because it can be used to tack things together for gluing, but is also very handy when doing things like stapling 1/4” ply to the back of a cabinet or book shelf for example.

- William Shelley

I don’t call $15 to $20 for a box of 10,000 spendy. My Hitachi pin nailer was $89, and while it’s limited to 1-3/8” pins, I would use my 18 ga brad nailer for anything longer than that anyway. The Hitachi works like a champ.

The narrow crown stapler is great for fastening where it won’t show, but the beauty of a pin nailer is that the hole is almost imperceptible, allowing trim to be pinned in place while glue dries.

I have them all, but if I was just starting out, it’d be a toss up between an 18 ga brad nailer and a 23 ga pin nailer.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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