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Any wood unsafe for cutting boards

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Forum topic by yellowtruck75 posted 1308 days ago 2816 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yellowtruck75

404 posts in 1669 days


1308 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: wenge

Are there any hardwoods that are considered unsafe for cutting boards? I have a large piece of wenge but never see people using it for cutting boards. Is it safe to use? I use food safe finishes so I am only concerned with the wood itself.


9 replies so far

View Lochlainn1066's profile

Lochlainn1066

138 posts in 1379 days


#1 posted 1308 days ago

Google “toxic woods” or “wood toxicity” and you’ll find what you need, although some of it needs decoding from the species to the common name. Some wood encyclopedias have it too.

Generally, domestics tend to be safe except for black locust and yew in the northwest. I don’t work with exotics much so I can’t help with wenge in particular.

-- Nate, thegaragestudio.etsy.com

View Marc5's profile

Marc5

304 posts in 1944 days


#2 posted 1308 days ago

I would stay with domestics since I had a reaction from Cocobolo. Could be just me but I am not sure. Let us know what you find out and do.

-- Marc

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2482 posts in 1378 days


#3 posted 1307 days ago

American cherry and maples are real good, walnut is good but some can react to it. Many oaks are hard enough but the grain is so open that bacteria can grow and water will go through it like straws (made a nice piece of fire wood that way). You want a hard wood and tight grain and check out the toxidity tables.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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woodcrafter47

349 posts in 1707 days


#4 posted 1307 days ago

cancel

-- In His service ,Richard

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woodcrafter47

349 posts in 1707 days


#5 posted 1307 days ago

Health hazards:The dust produced when cutting or sanding wenge can cause dermatitis similar to the effects of poison ivy and is an irritant to the eyes. The dust also can cause respiratory problems and drowsiness.[citation needed] Splinters are septic, similar to those of greenheart (the wood of Chlorocardium rodiei).

looked up in seach in google under wenge

-- In His service ,Richard

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1652 days


#6 posted 1306 days ago

Stay away from rosewoods (Dalbergia family). Iff you want to use exotics, yellowheart and bloodwood are ok, I THINK. Maple, cherry, walnut, birch, osage orange; good old domestic, tight grain hardwoods.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View millssnell's profile

millssnell

46 posts in 1373 days


#7 posted 1306 days ago

Any one know how poplar would work?

View ChrisCarr's profile

ChrisCarr

196 posts in 1500 days


#8 posted 1306 days ago

Poplar is sometimes considered a hardwood (which i don’t agree with) but its not nearly as hard as maple, cherry,etc.

I personally wouldn’t use poplar, I don’t think its hard enough for cutting boards, plus in my opinion it is more of a hassle to work than real hardwoods.

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1652 days


#9 posted 1305 days ago

Poplar will not work as pores are too large. Too many places for bugs to hide. Poploar is a hardwood, but only because of it’s taxonomy. It is a SOFT hardwood. Hickory is a HARD hardwood. Hickory would work.

Steve

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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