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What am I missing? Beginner tool set.

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Forum topic by ShawnO posted 07-18-2017 01:43 AM 951 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnO

6 posts in 159 days


07-18-2017 01:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: beginner tools

Just getting into wood working (purchasing more tools than actually working, but I digress)

Here’s what I currently have in my shop:

Power Tools:
- circular saw
- jig saw
- miter saw (small one though)
- scroll saw
- brad & finish nailer
- air compressor
- drill
- random orbital sander
- mouse sander

Hand tools:
- clamps
- chisels

Birthday today and got $200 from my old man for my new hobby. What should I purchase?

I believe need to get some planes / electric hand planer. Which route do I go? Do I need a router too?

Any help is greatly appreciated.


18 replies so far

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

440 posts in 2870 days


#1 posted 07-18-2017 01:57 AM

Tools perform tasks and/or solve problems. I suggest making a project starting with what you have, and seeing what tasks are difficult or not possible given your current tools.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5984 posts in 2033 days


#2 posted 07-18-2017 02:02 AM

Birthday today and got $200 from my old man for my new hobby. What should I purchase?

Wood. What would be nice to have will become obvious depending on what you want to make.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3932 days


#3 posted 07-18-2017 02:03 AM

What do you want to build?

You could use the money to build a workbench. :)

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

992 posts in 2684 days


#4 posted 07-18-2017 02:17 AM

I like the wood suggestions and building something to build skills to find what you need to have, after that given your budget, perhaps the Dewalt 611 router kit, nice tool and you could use if for mortising and edge detailing, but you also don’t list any layout tools, the main difference between a picnic table and a dining table is the way they are put together and learning to mark accurately and CUT accurately to achieve good square stock and joinery is a vital skill..
Oh and make a straight cutting jig for your circ.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10610 posts in 2214 days


#5 posted 07-18-2017 04:05 AM


Wood.
- MrUnix

+2

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Loren's profile

Loren

9610 posts in 3482 days


#6 posted 07-18-2017 04:17 AM

For a router you can get by pretty well
with a cheap used 1/4” router from a
pawn shop. 1/4” bit sets are available
on ebay and other sources pretty cheap.

One thing an old fixed base router won’t
do is plunge cut deep mortises for
furniture joints. Those can also be
drilled-out and chiseled square or cut
with a mortising chisel, of which you
really would only need one or two sizes
to tackle furniture joints.

Unless you plan to hang doors an electric
hand planer isn’t something you would
normally use as a substitute for hand
planes. They have their uses but hand
planes are far more versatile. I recommend
a used Stanley Bailey #5 plane as a
starter. You can flatten boards, straighten
edges, do fitting and smoothing with it.
You’ll also need some sharpening equipment
like oil or water stones.

A pocket hole jig is very useful for making
things without having to cut traditional
joints.

View ShawnO's profile

ShawnO

6 posts in 159 days


#7 posted 07-18-2017 10:20 AM

What do you mean by layout tools?


I like the wood suggestions and building something to build skills to find what you need to have, after that given your budget, perhaps the Dewalt 611 router kit, nice tool and you could use if for mortising and edge detailing, but you also don t list any layout tools, the main difference between a picnic table and a dining table is the way they are put together and learning to mark accurately and CUT accurately to achieve good square stock and joinery is a vital skill..
Oh and make a straight cutting jig for your circ.

- ChefHDAN


View ShawnO's profile

ShawnO

6 posts in 159 days


#8 posted 07-18-2017 10:22 AM

Stanley Bailey #5 plane. There are so many different ones on eBay: 1/2”, 1/4”, different lengths, etc. what should I look for?

Also, what sharpening equipment is mandatory for them?


For a router you can get by pretty well
with a cheap used 1/4” router from a
pawn shop. 1/4” bit sets are available
on ebay and other sources pretty cheap.

One thing an old fixed base router won t
do is plunge cut deep mortises for
furniture joints. Those can also be
drilled-out and chiseled square or cut
with a mortising chisel, of which you
really would only need one or two sizes
to tackle furniture joints.

Unless you plan to hang doors an electric
hand planer isn t something you would
normally use as a substitute for hand
planes. They have their uses but hand
planes are far more versatile. I recommend
a used Stanley Bailey #5 plane as a
starter. You can flatten boards, straighten
edges, do fitting and smoothing with it.
You ll also need some sharpening equipment
like oil or water stones.

A pocket hole jig is very useful for making
things without having to cut traditional
joints.

- Loren


View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

378 posts in 216 days


#9 posted 07-18-2017 10:59 AM

Before you go out and buy any more tools, just make something. Make anything. You’ll be amazed what you can do with what you already have and a little creativity.

MAKE SOMETHING!!

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

473 posts in 385 days


#10 posted 07-18-2017 11:06 AM

Ideas:
Workbench (DIY build)
toolboxes (DIY build)
Mallet (DIY build)
hammers
A 4 and 5 plane (Stanley Bailey is good enough)
Grinder
Sharpening stones (400-1200 or finer plus a piece of leather and buffing compound)
Lots of sandpaper
Lathe
Craigslist Jointer

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

992 posts in 2684 days


#11 posted 07-18-2017 01:15 PM



What do you mean by layout tools?
- ShawnO

Measuring & marking tools for good solid square lines. I use a 4” Starret combination square on almost every mark, marks are made with either a good pencil or a marking knife, if I need to be super accurate. I also have a 12” Starret combo square set that is used but not nearly as much as the 4” one. The combo square can be used in many ways as can a marking gauge to set it for a measurement which is easily repeatable across different boards etc without trying to duplicate measurements with a tape or ruler which are almost always off.

There are often good deals on Ebay for the Starret squares, be careful and watch out for the left handed ones though, unless you’re left handed of course.

Oh, and welcome to LJ’s

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View gargey's profile

gargey

862 posts in 610 days


#12 posted 07-18-2017 02:16 PM

What you need is a function of what you want to make. As other said.

What is the next thing you want to make?

What do you expect to be making over the years?

Are you old enough to drink beer? (If so use $ accordingly)

View MikeUT's profile

MikeUT

167 posts in 1194 days


#13 posted 07-18-2017 02:39 PM



Stanley Bailey #5 plane. There are so many different ones on eBay: 1/2”, 1/4”, different lengths, etc. what should I look for?

Also, what sharpening equipment is mandatory for them?

ShawnO

I’m not sure what you mean by different lengths of planes. you might be seeing 5, 5 1/4, 5 1/2 planes. The fraction denotes a different width. Stick with a regular #5, it is the best entry-level plane. It is the most versatile and the cheapest. Go watch how Paul Sellars restores a plane. Look up the ‘Scary Sharp’ method of sharpening.

A plane is a good idea, buying wood and making a workbench is a great idea. You’ll need a bench and it will help you hone your skills. When I first started out, I focused on the projects I wanted to build and planned my tool purchases accordingly. Don’t spend $200 on a router if you need a router, more clamps, and a saw to complete the project.

One more sliver of advice: Start checking craigslist regularly for tools. You get much more bang for your buck and there is no difference between a second-hand tool and a third-hand tool. You can buy a functional $50 router that will work just fine until you are ready to upgrade to something better. Then you can sell the router for the same $50 and put it in to something else. It’s actually pretty easy to sell a used tool for more than you paid for it if you are patient and found a good deal.

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

483 posts in 1085 days


#14 posted 07-18-2017 03:16 PM

Figure out what you want to build, a workbench or maybe a sawbench to start with will work. Get the tools you need to complete that project. Repeat that process on the next project. Tool shopping takes care of itself. Get the best tools your budget will allow. Otherwise you aren’t tool shopping, but rather fool shopping.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View Bluenote38's profile

Bluenote38

219 posts in 223 days


#15 posted 07-18-2017 03:48 PM



layout tools, the main difference between a picnic table and a dining table is the way they are put together and learning to mark accurately and CUT accurately

- ChefHDAN

Ditto – you’ll need a square, small if you are working on small stuff (12” Combination square), large (Framing) square for larger things though my framing square is my “go to” fro anything bigger than 8”

-- Bill - Rochester MI

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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