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Kuster Sandstar SS757 37" wide belt sander?

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 07-17-2017 11:30 AM 827 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

198 posts in 410 days


07-17-2017 11:30 AM

Hey guys,I just came across a Kuster Sandstar SS757 wide belt sander for the same price as the Powermatic PM2244 and the SuperMax 25×2. I have been researching which drum sander that I want to go with for my small custom cabinet shop, and I was wondering if you guys would fully recommend this older wife belt sander over the Powermatic PM2244 and the SuperMax 25×2? This would be used mostly for sanding cabinet doors, although it is a 37” sander so I could also run face frames through it. This unit was manufactured sometime around the year 1995. The only thing that I am hessitant about is the fact that it is so old, and I don’t know how hard it would be to work on or procure parts for. What do you guys think about this? I have the space, air compressor and dust collection requirements for it.

sorry for all the threads! I have to make a decision on this today, so I need some advice bad!


7 replies so far

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

584 posts in 970 days


#1 posted 07-17-2017 11:43 AM

if you guys would fully recommend this older wife belt sander

- SweetTea

i prefer a younger wife to sand with. :)

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1581 posts in 2560 days


#2 posted 07-17-2017 11:50 AM

sweet tea….I would certainly recommend a wide belt over a drum sander for sure.

But… i do not recommend a wide belt for anything other than a serious production environment

They require lots of space, lots of power and mostly LOTS OF DUST COLLECTION

I do lots and lots of doors and do not have one, nor do i want one

A close friend has a time saver and it is down half the time, repair parts are pricey

You will still need to do some sanding after the wide belt..

If you have the money , the space, and just hate sanding that much…...have at it

we ll talk in a year or so.

enjoy the journey JB

View Loren's profile

Loren

9281 posts in 3399 days


#3 posted 07-17-2017 03:52 PM

I agree that drum sanders are simpler
machines to maintain, but there’s a
large difference in how much time sanding
will take between a drum and a wide
belt.

I have a drum sander, which I dislike.
Never had anything but trouble with it.

I also have a small 12” wide belt and its
a very robust machine. I’ve spent a
fair amount of hours crawling through
it cleaning it up. At first it was mechanically
intimidating but now I’m familiar with it.

I also have a stroke sander which is quite
fast at sanding and very simple mechanically.
You might consider one of those.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1655 posts in 650 days


#4 posted 07-17-2017 09:42 PM

But… i do not recommend a wide belt for anything other than a serious production environment

They require lots of space, lots of power and mostly LOTS OF DUST COLLECTION

A close friend has a time saver and it is down half the time, repair parts are pricey

- cabmaker

I have to disagree a little bit.

The foot print on my 37” wide belt is only 5’ x 5’ that includes the intake and output feed belt rollers.
I hook it up to my 4” port on my Powermatic double bag dust collector and it works fine.
I use mine once or twice a week, not high production, but when I use it, it’s great, and I’m glad I have it.
Hardly no down time in the 15 years I’ve had mine. replaced a tracking part, spent maybe 100 bucks.
That’s about all I have ever put into it besides some link belts.
YMMV,
but I’ve had great success with mine and wouldn’t think about owning a drum sander after having the wide belt.

The only downside is the 3 phase power, which my shop has, but others may not.

I’ve never tried the stroke sander but find them interesting.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

603 posts in 246 days


#5 posted 07-18-2017 03:32 AM

Having used a Timesaver belt sander, a stroke sander and currently owning the PM2244, I’d recommend a belt sander hands down. Our Timesaver was used daily and I don’t recall it having any excessive maintenance issues. It is a complex piece of machinery and you will need to set one up properly. I can’t comment on the Kuster directly, never used one. Do your research.

I spent many hours at the stroke sander as well. It is mechanically simple, but will not flatten a cabinet door quite as nicely as a belt or drum sander will. Fast stock removal for sure. Worked great on table tops. Hard to effectively collect dust from.

Drum sanders are for hobbyists. Too slow for all but the lightest production needs.

If you are in a production environment and have the room and volumes to justify it, the belt sander is the best option. It will pay for itself quickly if you have the volume to keep it busy. or just outsource your doors like everyone else does.

so what is the volume of doors you typically make in a week?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

198 posts in 410 days


#6 posted 07-18-2017 02:13 PM

Typically in a weeks time I will make between 30-50 doors. This isn’t every single week but probably 30 weeks out of the year, maybe more. This wide belt is a 7.5HP single phase 220v, and has been well maintained. I am actually on my way to pick it up now. Do you guys know anything about these Kuster Sandstar models? This one seems rather simple to maintain.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

603 posts in 246 days


#7 posted 07-18-2017 04:14 PM

good choice, be sure to post a few pictures after you get it set up. I think your door volume justifies it, especially if you got a decent deal on it.

With a 37” belt width & 7.5 hp you’ll push through doors in no time, I’d bet 10x faster than a drum sander. I think our Timesaver was about 37” also. the nice thing about the wider belt is you can run several doors through in parallel and really up your throughput. be sure to send them through at a slight angle, and try to use the entire width of the belt to even out the wear.

good luck with it!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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