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Walker Turner TA-1165 table saw

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Forum topic by eric4716 posted 07-16-2017 05:03 PM 519 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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eric4716

45 posts in 224 days


07-16-2017 05:03 PM

I had posted looking for advice to purchase the Walker Turner table saw or keep my Ryobi. I put the Ryobi up for sale and sold it. So I went and bought the Walker Turner last evening and brought it home. It’s a solid and heavy heavy saw. Even the fence probably weight 40 pounds.

It will need a good bit to get it completely cleaned up. The table has a good bit of rust on it. I have watched various video with different techniques to remove rust from tables. With different chemicals, vinegar. To using steel wood, scotch-brite pads, to even sanding them. What should I use?

I’ve also thought about completely disassembling it and re painting the entire body of it. Should I go that route, or try to leave it original with the factory paint?

I have seen the mobile bases on larger cabinet style table saws. Would one work on the saw?

It only has the 1/2 HP motor that was rebuilt. It’s also missing the indicator mechanism for showing the angle of the blade. The only thing I don’t really like about the design it the large turn wheel to raise and lower the blade. It’s tucked away basically inside the body. Overall, I’m satisfied with it.














16 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#1 posted 07-16-2017 05:22 PM

I personally would tear it down and do a complete restore… but that’s just me. As for the table top, start with a razor and scrape off most of the crud… you will be amazed how much will come off initially. Then a scotch brite pad with some solvent will get rid of most of what’s left. Put it under a vibrating sander to speed things up. If you still have some staining or discoloration, a light oxalic acid product – like Barkeepers friend – will usually help get rid of them (or at least make them less noticable). Follow up with a few coats of paste wax.

Some people will suggest more abrasive methods, like sanding… but I really dislike using abrasives on machined surfaces. YMMV.

And if you haven’t already, go over to the OWWM site – there are several owners of that machine and they can provide a wealth of information.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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GR8HUNTER

2628 posts in 468 days


#2 posted 07-16-2017 05:49 PM

GRATZ .....you have a well made saw there …I would redo it ….should last you a lifetime …and do what ever you throw at it :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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rodneywt1180b

141 posts in 142 days


#3 posted 07-16-2017 10:06 PM

Another vote to rebuild it now.
At least do the bearings and give it a good cleaning before you put it to work.
If you’re like me if you wait and use it first it will feel more like a chore or interruption when you do have to work on it.

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

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MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#4 posted 07-17-2017 01:35 AM

The only thing I don’t really like about the design it the large turn wheel to raise and lower the blade. It’s tucked away basically inside the body.

That weird arrangement got me curious… so I did a quick search about it. Looking at your picture, and comparing to pictures over at the VM site, I believe yours is a PO modification… particularly where it looks like the ‘access’ to the handle was cut out of the cabinet under where there should have just been a circular inspection plate. The tilt and raise mechanisms should have both been accessible from the outside of the cabinet. Here is the catalog illustration showing the side of the cabinet with the inspection plate (and no cutout like on yours):

And here is one in the wild:

Unfortunately, that saw was apparently only made for one year (1939), so there is very little documentation on it. I’m sure you will figure it out once you start to dig into it though. Keep us posted.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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eric4716

45 posts in 224 days


#5 posted 07-17-2017 05:02 AM



The only thing I don’t really like about the design it the large turn wheel to raise and lower the blade. It’s tucked away basically inside the body.

That weird arrangement got me curious… so I did a quick search about it. Looking at your picture, and comparing to pictures over at the VM site, I believe yours is a PO modification… particularly where it looks like the access to the handle was cut out of the cabinet under where there should have just been a circular inspection plate. The tilt and raise mechanisms should have both been accessible from the outside of the cabinet. Here is the catalog illustration showing the side of the cabinet with the inspection plate (and no cutout like on yours):

And here is one in the wild:

Unfortunately, that saw was apparently only made for one year (1939), so there is very little documentation on it. I m sure you will figure it out once you start to dig into it though. Keep us posted.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I had noticed that the circle inspection cover was missing, but didn’t think much about the additional
cutout. I had assumed that the raise and lower blade wheel was the way it was designed. Since I haven’t been able to find and manual on this particular model, only the catalog. Upon further inspection, it appears that the additional cutout was put there to accommodate the raise and lower wheel when the blade is tilted. I noticed this when I tilted the blade nearly 45 degrees and the wheel stuck out the side of the cabinet.

I noticed that it looks like the raise and lower mechanism should come out the front of the cabinet to the right of the handle that locks the tilting mechanism:

I’m still trying to figure out how the original raise and lower mechanism should have worked. It looks like it went through a small tube about an inch long, there is a small gap where it went through a hole in the trunnions for a couple inches where it appears that it stops. There must have been some kind of elbow that runs over and connects to where the new raise and lower runs up through the trunnions.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#6 posted 07-17-2017 05:26 AM

Yup, the raising mechanism should be up front where yours is missing. From scanning a few discussions over at the OWWM site, the general consensus appears to be that the 1180 is basically the same guts, but in a sheet metal cabinet instead of cast iron like yours. If you look at the manual for the 1180, it shows how the handwheel turns a gear to move a raising/lowering linked arm. That probably broke or failed at some point, and a PO came up with a creative way to get it to work. Who knows.

Anyway, if it works – have at it. You can always keep an eye out for replacement parts while you are using it as is. You could post a WTB ad over at the OWWM site, or maybe one of the members there has a similar machine they are parting out that you could get the parts from. You may get lucky and find stuff on the bay, but I wouldn’t hold my breath on that one. Or you could just not worry about it, accept the hassle of height changes, and start making sawdust :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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eric4716

45 posts in 224 days


#7 posted 07-17-2017 06:23 AM



Yup, the raising mechanism should be up front where yours is missing. From scanning a few discussions over at the OWWM site, the general consensus appears to be that the 1180 is basically the same guts, but in a sheet metal cabinet instead of cast iron like yours. If you look at the manual for the 1180, it shows how the handwheel turns a gear to move a raising/lowering linked arm. That probably broke or failed at some point, and a PO came up with a creative way to get it to work. Who knows.

Anyway, if it works – have at it. You can always keep an eye out for replacement parts while you are using it as is. You could post a WTB ad over at the OWWM site, or maybe one of the members there has a similar machine they are parting out that you could get the parts from. You may get lucky and find stuff on the bay, but I wouldn t hold my breath on that one. Or you could just not worry about it, accept the hassle of height changes, and start making sawdust :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

That is good to know that the internals are the same as another model as it seems that the 1165 is pretty rare from only being made the single year. I’ve decided that I’m going to try my first shot with this and tear it down and repaint it. I’ve already taken the front rail, and extension tables off. So I might try to find the missing pieces and get the raise and lowering to work as it was designed to do. I like the look of the wheel crank that’s on it, so I might use it on the front if I can get that back to original.

I haven’t figured out what to use to take the blade off yet. The round piece on the arbor has three holes in it, but they look like they are rounded out. I’m not sure what was supposed to be used to hold that while I can loosen up the nut on the arbor.

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MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 07-17-2017 06:35 AM

Just use a hunk of wood… grab a scrap 2×4 and jam it in front of the blade to keep it from turning. Put a wrench on the arbor nut and give it a good whack with a wood mallet or similar (poor mans impact wrench). It’s a right tilt, so it should be a left hand thread – pull the arbor wrench towards you (front).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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hairy

2543 posts in 3287 days


#9 posted 07-17-2017 02:35 PM

I like this for rust removal. Also in pints. https://www.harborfreight.com/1-gallon-evapo-rust-rust-remover-96431.html

I used it on this. http://lumberjocks.com/topics/42906

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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ohtimberwolf

714 posts in 2107 days


#10 posted 07-17-2017 03:06 PM

Since you are breaking it down, here is another option. I have used it and love it.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=table+saw+electrolis

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View eric4716's profile

eric4716

45 posts in 224 days


#11 posted 07-18-2017 12:37 AM



Since you are breaking it down, here is another option. I have used it and love it.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=table+saw+electrolis

- ohtimberwolf

I have watched several videos on this process and am interested in possibly doing this for the table and extensions. Should I try doing this with the cabinet too, or would it be better to have that blasted? This is my first attempt at restoring any piece of equipment, so I’m new to the appropriate process for different pieces. What kind of paint would be good to use?

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MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#12 posted 07-18-2017 12:59 AM

This is my first attempt at restoring any piece of equipment, so I’m new to the appropriate process for different pieces. What kind of paint would be good to use?

There are no hard fast rules as to what method to use. A lot depends on size/shape and what is available. Evaporust is great stuff, but difficult to use on large pieces as it needs to be submerged (soaking rags works, but not really all that well). For your cast iron base, media blasting would probably work best. Electrolysis would be better if it were sheet metal. For paint – your choice. Most use an oil based industrial enamel, but some go all out and use automotive urethanes and other high end finishes, and some just rattle-can it with whatever they can find at wallyworld.

One note: Evaporust doesn’t remove paint, just rust. Electrolysis removes rust, but can sometimes remove paint as well. If you are looking at getting to bare metal, blasting or chemical strippers are the way to go. In many cases you don’t need to remove paint though… if it’s stuck on good, you can leave it and paint over. Wire wheels chucked in an angle grinder or electric drill works well for those areas. Needle scrapers work well on other areas. Don’t rule out phosphoric acid either. Lots of ways to go about it.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you have a Tractor Supply near you, you can get Evaporust a couple bucks a gallon cheaper than what it sells for at HF.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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eric4716

45 posts in 224 days


#13 posted 07-18-2017 01:26 AM



This is my first attempt at restoring any piece of equipment, so I’m new to the appropriate process for different pieces. What kind of paint would be good to use?

There are no hard fast rules as to what method to use. A lot depends on size/shape and what is available. Evaporust is great stuff, but difficult to use on large pieces as it needs to be submerged (soaking rags works, but not really all that well). For your cast iron base, media blasting would probably work best. Electrolysis would be better if it were sheet metal. For paint – your choice. Most use an oil based enamel, but some go all out and use automotive urethanes and other high end finishes, and some just rattle-can it with whatever they can find at wallyworld.

One note: Evaporust doesn t remove paint, just rust. Electrolysis removes rust, but can sometimes remove paint as well. If you are looking at getting to bare metal, blasting or chemical strippers are the way to go.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you have a Tractor Supply near you, you can get Evaporust a couple bucks a gallon cheaper than what it sells for at HF.

- MrUnix

Thanks for the advice. Looking at the cabinet, it looks like it comes apart in sections. With each corner being a section. I had watched a video of a guy who used the electrolysis process to restore an old Craftsman jointer that turned out beautiful. He said in the video that it would remove paint and only need a light wire brushing after soaking it for a day or so. I don’t have a battery charger or any othe supplies to do the electrolysis, so it might be more cost effective just to have it blasted.

As for the paint, I want it to look nice and be durable. I can’t afford to sink that much money into the paint for it. So as long as the paint holds up to normal use. I plan on using the saw, so it doesn’t need to be museum quality.

I did get the blade removed, the switch and motor unwired and removed, and the motor mounting bracket removed. Not much left beside the tunnions, the tilt and raise and lower cranks, and the table. You can see now where the original raise and lower was supposed to run. In the left side of the photo, it ran through the small collar with the nut, behind the piece that the motor bracket bolts to, and into the other collar to the right of that, which stops below the round piece with the two set screws. I’m thinking there might have been a worm gear in the collar on the right where it stops that connected it all together to raise and lower.

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MrUnix

5717 posts in 1954 days


#14 posted 07-18-2017 01:44 AM

He said in the video that it would remove paint and only need a light wire brushing after soaking it for a day or so.

Depends on the paint and how well it’s on there… sometimes it does, sometimes not. I’ve had machines where it would just flake off from electrolysis, and others where it did very little to the paint. As for what is needed – you don’t have to have a battery charger… any type of DC power supply that can do a couple of amps will work, or you could even just use a regular car battery. The washing soda is a couple of bucks for a box and will last a lifetime. For large stuff, you can make a shallow frame out of scrap wood and line with plastic:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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rodneywt1180b

141 posts in 142 days


#15 posted 07-18-2017 07:38 PM

I’m a fan of electrolysis on cast iron. I think it’s more effective on cast iron than sheet metal for removing rust. Cheap and effective, no harsh chemicals and it doesn’t hurt machined surfaces. The only real drawback is it can be a little messy.

The replacement wheel for raising the blade looks like it might be off an old treadle sewing machine base.
It might be worth posting a picture here. http://www.victoriansweatshop.com/?forum=501752
Someone might be able to identify it and might be looking for one.
Rodney

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

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