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chamfer on table top

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Forum topic by Apjow posted 07-16-2017 10:57 AM 799 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Apjow

23 posts in 386 days


07-16-2017 10:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: trick tip jig

Hello, I’ve been asked to make a table top out of cherry wood. I’ll try to explain this as best I could.
Table top 1 5/8 thick
Bevel 5/8 From the top
Bevel 1 5/8 wide
Bevel starting at table leg insides and ending at table leg insides

The bevel will start and end at the table legs, 5” from the end of the table, on all 4 edges.
The question is, how would you go about performing an operation like this?
If I didn’t explain properly, I apologize, I don’t know how to post a picture to show either, maybe you can help with that too!
Thanks


11 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2597 posts in 2113 days


#1 posted 07-16-2017 12:48 PM

Figure out what that angle is by drawing it out on a piece of paper. Then either cut it with a circular saw or table saw with the top standing on it’s thickness (you’ll have to clamp support material on the edge if you use a circular saw to keep the sole plate flat). You’d have to start and stop short and finish it with a hand saw. Unless you can find a router bit close enough to that profile to run it through a router table or shaper. You’ll still have to finish with a hand saw if the chamfer is suppose to end squared off.

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Apjow

23 posts in 386 days


#2 posted 07-18-2017 01:08 AM

Thanks, I was thinking of trying something like that, but I’ll try my hand at making a jig first. I’m not the best at making jigs, so this should be a good opportunity to get better. I figure I’d figure out my angle and make an edge running jig, this way I can have the same cut on all 4 sides.

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ChefHDAN

989 posts in 2666 days


#3 posted 07-18-2017 02:42 AM

Is the table already existing and you’re making a new top? Very confusing description, for putting in a photo, you just need to click the img button and select a photo from your computer to insert. SOme photos would REALLY help us help you. I’d suggest you use a Chamfer bit in a router to make the cuts & then you can easily start & stop where you want. Look at these chamfer bits it’s okay it’s a safe link to the MLCS site, and you can often find their items on Amazon which if you’re Prime you can get the free shipping. They have a bit with a 1 3/8” cutting length which should be “close enough” for your 1 5/8” spec. IMO

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Apjow

23 posts in 386 days


#4 posted 07-20-2017 01:10 AM

Here is the table, it’s not exactly the same but the idea is there. My concerns are that there is no skirt or apron to keep the table flat ( I’ll put support hidden underneath). The wood was already glued together before I received it and there are some 8” wide boards glued next to each other, already warping! I’ll probably rip it and put it back together, and I have to add extensions on the end to expand the table, first time I work with these concepts, so a little worried but pretty sure I can do it. Any advice, concerns, or anything is most welcome, thanks!

View Loren's profile

Loren

9564 posts in 3465 days


#5 posted 07-20-2017 01:18 AM

Get a spokehshave, chisels, rasps and
files and make the parts.

Don’t forget to charge good money
for your time taking over somebody
else’s problem.

You can rough cut bevels to within 3/16”
or so, maybe closer using a good quality
jig saw and perhaps a long blade.
Bosch is good. I have a Festool which
is good too. Jig saw blades are known
to deflect in the cut but how much depends
on the blade and the wood being cut.

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ChefHDAN

989 posts in 2666 days


#6 posted 07-20-2017 12:58 PM



Get a spokehshave, chisels, rasps and
files and make the parts.
Don t forget to charge good money
for your time taking over somebody
else s problem.
- Loren

Have to agree with Loren there, but i’d likely build a 90* jig base for my router to keep it dead flat & stable on the edge and use that big chamfer bit to get the cuts done and then finish/finesse with a spoke shave

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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jbay

1800 posts in 716 days


#7 posted 07-20-2017 01:14 PM

Straight bit in a router with a tilt base.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1255 posts in 737 days


#8 posted 07-20-2017 02:50 PM

Apjow,

If you have the latitude to substitute a cove for the chamfer, the cove could be accomplished at the table saw. A temporary fence set diagonal to the table saw blade would guide the table top. A start and stop block would limit the length of the cut. In doing the table saw cove, multiple passes are made, each no more than 1/8” deeper than the previous cut, until the depth of the cove is achieved.

If interested, here is a video that discusses setup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZqXyiYDmj34

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Apjow

23 posts in 386 days


#9 posted 07-20-2017 04:24 PM

Thanks for all the replies and links! The chamfer is around 66 degrees, if I remember correctly, I have it written down somewhere. So a 45 degree bit won’t really help, I tried one already by doing small passes with the router. Does anyone know of any router bits that would have a larger angle? it doesn’t have to be exactly the same, I do have some leeway with that, as for the cove idea, although I can’t wait to try that technique, the client has his heart set on this “zen” design. And I’d like to achieve this design as well. Maybe I’ll do a test with a jig saw, mine is pretty old, but it won’t quit! Seems like a lot of fixing up afterwards though. probably an angled jig with a 1 5/8 straight bit taking 1/8 or so off at a time. I really should just start already!! Hahaha procrastination at its finest

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Loren

9564 posts in 3465 days


#10 posted 07-20-2017 04:47 PM

You may be able to fudge it with a panel
raising bit. with a straight profile. I think
the angle is probably not right but I never
measured. You would still have to finish
the cut by hand as a panel raiser has
“steps” on both ends of the cut.

A long straight bit in a tilting router base
is another option. You can buy tilting router
bases from a few different sources.

If you have a radial arm saw a large angled
auxiliary table can be built and the bevel cut
by cranking the saw up high and using a
dado blade to remove the material.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2597 posts in 2113 days


#11 posted 07-22-2017 01:00 AM

Cut a wedge of wood at 21 degrees, clamp it to the top and run the base of your router across that

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