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Forum topic by Jim55 posted 07-14-2017 09:45 PM 1232 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim55

161 posts in 1817 days


07-14-2017 09:45 PM

Hello all.
I found a source for free wood and I am piling it up. It’s pallets from an industrial AC manufacturer. A lot of these pallets appear to have been just made for sheet steel and only used once. Some are as long as 8 and a few even 10” long. A lot of 2×3s, 3×4s and even 4×4s, some of them oak. Not having a lot of use for the bigger timbers (at least, in the quantities I’m accumulating- I have brought home as much as 5 trailer loads at a time!) I reckon on resawing some to suit my needs.
So far, I have had no luck finding blades that do very well. I’m talking about looking for blades for a basic wood cutting 14” bandsaw with riser kit wanting a 105” bandsaw blade. I understand 1/2” is about the max blade width for proper blade tensioning on this type/size saw. As for my ability with such saws, I was a “saw man” at an industrial shop for a good two years though that was more metal cutting. Still, set up and operation of the verticle bandsaw is pretty much the same.

I am considering carbide tipped blades but they are sooo costly. Do they last long enough and work well enough to justify the cost?

Another thing I have seen are “carbide impregnated” blades, basically blades coated w/powdered caarbide. These run half the price of the full carbide toothed blades but, do they hold up?

Then there’s the vaunted “Wood Slicer” from Highland Tools. How would it compare to the carbided blades described above?

I expect from research done so far, a 2-3 tpi variable count blade would be the best bet. Nicht wahr?

I reckon that’s about enough for now! I appreciate all the help I can get! Money’s tight so I have to choose wisely!
Thanks!


28 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

857 posts in 1311 days


#1 posted 07-14-2017 10:20 PM

Laguna Resaw King

View Loren's profile

Loren

9281 posts in 3398 days


#2 posted 07-14-2017 10:58 PM

Viking/Timber Wolf blades are good.

They can be resharpened. It can be done
with a dremel tool or sent out to a saw
shop.

I wasn’t impressed with Wood Slicer. They
cut great when new but dull rapidly and
cannot be resharpened by a shop due to
the variable-pitch design.

If you can afford it, carbide tipped blades
stay sharp a long, long time.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1504 posts in 340 days


#3 posted 07-14-2017 11:15 PM

I replaced a poor performing Olson with a Wood Slicer. It’s like night and day better, but I haven’t been using it long enough to comment on Loren’s rapid dulling experience.

I’ll say that, when new, it’s a joy to use.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

803 posts in 2563 days


#4 posted 07-14-2017 11:30 PM

I am a fan of the “Wood Slicer” when new they cut very well and will have no issue with 4” oak. But I do admit they tend to dull sooner that I would expect.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1086 posts in 1548 days


#5 posted 07-15-2017 12:10 AM

Since you have a small bandsaw your going to be limited to balde choice.
I recommend the Olsen Pro .025 1/2 inch 3T hook it’s a very good blade. I use this balde on my small saw and it does pretty good.
The other option is to find a local saw sharpening service and have them make up blades for you.They can be a very affordable if you are going thru a lot of blades.

-- Aj

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

364 posts in 1212 days


#6 posted 07-15-2017 01:10 AM

I was going to use Lenox blades from this web site, and found alot of info here on about the difference in all the blade choices. Before I pulled the trigger though I found a shop here in Las Vegas that makes them on site. I am still experimenting with that purchase and will someday buy some Lenox blades just to just to compare.
https://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/

They custom make any length blade. Click on the blade finder tab. I saw four wood blades that were offered at 1/2” and smaller. Two were carbon steel at about $16 for a 105” blade, a bi metal for around $40, and a Carbide for alot of cash. Around $150. I had read that for the hobby wood worker, and I know a couple pros that agree with this, that the carbide blade price is not worth it. At $16 a blade you just throw it away and move on as needed. Still, I would like to try out a carbide blade. Don’t know if I’ll ever spend that cash on it, but still curious.
Here is a link to blade info. Good reading. https://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/technical-documents

-- John

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2550 posts in 2672 days


#7 posted 07-15-2017 08:50 PM

I used to get lots of pallet wood like you describe when I was working as a sheet metal worker. Mostly 4”x 4” x 10’. Soft and hard woods. I suggest you re-saw them on your table saw using a “planer” sawblade. (I use diablo) Not a combination blade. It will make a great cut. Much faster than a band saw. I have a 14” bandsaw with riser that uses 105” blades and I get them from “Supercut” I resaw 6” and 8” cedar, maple and oak boards to 3/8” and use their best , carbide impregnated, 1/2” resaw blade with good results. I have tried woodslicer blades and as has been said they do not last long. The Supercut carbide impregnated blades last about ten times as long as the woodslicer blades and cost the same. ($28) Again, I would not resaw a 4×4 using a bandsaw. I find any bandsaw cut will require planeing. so its thin kerf thickness is not much of a help.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

324 posts in 354 days


#8 posted 07-15-2017 11:03 PM


I used to get lots of pallet wood like you describe when I was working as a sheet metal worker. Mostly 4”x 4” x 10 . Soft and hard woods. I suggest you re-saw them on your table saw using a “planer” sawblade. (I use diablo) Not a combination blade. It will make a great cut. Much faster than a band saw.

- Jim Finn


+1 It sounds like you have ample access to the material. Use the TS and flip end over end and run through the planer if need be. 10 times faster and much much cleaner cut. Since it’s free and ample waste isn’t a question. Cut them to varying thicknesses a little proud of like 3/4, 1”,1 1/2”. You can always resaw/plane them thinner.

As long as dimensions and conditions allow my TS is sometimes the best resaw tool in my shop.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1475 posts in 973 days


#9 posted 07-15-2017 11:07 PM

A carbide tipped blade is worth the premium if you cut enough to wear it out. The only fear I would have is with pallets, there can be hidden nails and small rocks embedded into the surface which will kill any blade.

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

161 posts in 1817 days


#10 posted 07-15-2017 11:50 PM

Thanks for all the replys! I had tried a “wood slicer” once cutting some oak and cedar (Both very common in East Texas’ “piney Woods”) and it seemed to me to have dulled rather quickly.

My table saw only cuts 3-5/8”. Would ist still be time efective to saw oneway and have to flip it to make a second pass?

I take your point on the carbide blade costs. I just hate changing blades all that often. Sounds like the “carbide coated’ bandsaw blades, if not doing it on the table saw.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1718 posts in 2694 days


#11 posted 07-16-2017 12:18 AM

I quite worrying about following the set of the tooth and started just touching the top of each tooth with a 1-1/2” diamond coated grinding head I picked up at Harbor Freight. Since doing this, the process of sharpening is much quicker and I’ve been able to squeeze a lot of use out of even blades that fought with a nail. There are videos on this method and it’s well worth the time.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1086 posts in 1548 days


#12 posted 07-16-2017 01:50 AM

It’s safer to Resaw on the bandsaw.But hay feel free to live dangerously sometimes i do too.:)

-- Aj

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

324 posts in 354 days


#13 posted 07-17-2017 12:39 AM


My table saw only cuts 3-5/8”. Would ist still be time efective to saw oneway and have to flip it to make a second pass?
- Jim55

Yes, I think so especially if you’re cutting them for future use. A couple of 2” swipes on each edge of a 4’ board thru a TS takes less than a minute. That’s maybe 10 mins on a 14” BS. Plus, I’d want to save that resaw blade for actual projects. And like someone said, it’s pallet wood. BS blades don’t ignore nails like TS blades do. But that’s just me.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

161 posts in 1817 days


#14 posted 07-17-2017 05:11 AM

Again, thanks for the replies.

I am considering the super cuts carbide coated blades. Their “premium gold” “3 hook tooth” blade is available in 1/2” width for about $40 on ye olde Amazon.

Their “Resaw” blade with the 2-3 tpi is highly thought of round the web but, is only available in 5/8” minimum width. That’s a bit much for a 14” bs. Yet, they seem to think it’s all right. I have contacted them to see what they have to say about it. Also, this blade runs a lot higher, about $80 on Amazon (prices include shipping).

Still, cheaper than carbide toothed blades the cheapest in 1/2” w I have found so far runs $135 (no charge applied separately for shipping).

That’s all for now. I’ll report back with Supercut’s comments (if any).

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2550 posts in 2672 days


#15 posted 07-17-2017 12:04 PM

Jim 55: I suggest you call supercuts and order directly from them. I think they will sell that same blade to you for less than $40.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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