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Forum topic by JTTHECLOCKMAN posted 12-25-2010 04:04 AM 1749 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JTTHECLOCKMAN

176 posts in 2617 days


12-25-2010 04:04 AM

Who has a web site? I am looking to get a web site up. Any suggestions for some good ones and why do you think it is good? Is it a free or what is the fee??? I have no idea what I am doing so this will be a huge learning thing. I tried getting Serif WebPlusX4 software and had to send it back because it is not compatible with my system which is WindowsXP64. I appreciate any info. Thanks

-- John T.


15 replies so far

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2478 days


#1 posted 12-25-2010 04:25 AM

What is the purpose of the website? Business, pleasure, blog, etc.?

What do you sell? A service (custom woodworking) or products?

Who is your target audience?

What kind of capabilities do you need on your site? Just information and graphics, or a shopping cart & ordering system?

How much are you willing to spend, if at all?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

176 posts in 2617 days


#2 posted 12-25-2010 04:37 AM

The purpose of the web site will be to sell my wares. I make all kinds of items such as hand turned pens, scrollsawn items and clocks. Target audience—anyone who has cash. Need paypal that is the only form of credit card acceptance I will take. I can also take checks.

Costs—have no idea what this runs. I am sure there is a hosting monthly fee. I probably can work with templates to do the setup. I have the Domain names.

I am trying to gather info as to what is available and looking for examples of peoples web sites.

-- John T.

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Steven H

1117 posts in 2528 days


#3 posted 12-25-2010 04:46 AM

I use Host monster as web host, it works fine. I choose this because they have a built in Zen Cart download. Has paypal, USPS, Product listing, everything you need.
Cost $80 a year for hosting.
My website didn’t last long. I ended up in Ebay.
I figured the item im selling will not cover the hosting cost.
The problem is people knowing your website.
I tried with Google ads and Facebook with small budget, it wont work. You need at least $1,000 budget or more.

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Kevin

462 posts in 2673 days


#4 posted 12-27-2010 06:36 AM

Does you domain name hosting service also let you add/change/modify your dns entries as well? Probably your best bet is to have your website hosted. The other option is for you to host it yourself, build the website yourself, etc….

I use godaddy.com It’s pretty cheap. Microsoft also has an option where you pay like 10 bucks per year and you get several templates to start your site. You could sell on ebay also and have a website that has all your information displayed on it along with option to buy. You will need to make your website able to get lots of hits in the search engines like google to get traffic for sure.

http://www.officelive.com/en-us/free-website

Lots of options to choose from when it comes to hosting.

-- Williamsburg, KY

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

176 posts in 2617 days


#5 posted 12-27-2010 11:18 PM

I learned many years ago never say never, but i do not want to do ebay. Try to compete with people that devalue their work just to sell is not my venue. I like ebay for their auctions. I think ETSY does not get the traffic other than more crafters looking what the next guy is making and copying. Again not my cup of tea at this time. I want to give the web site a shot and yes I hear so many negatives about them but it is also a place I can send potential customers and having a business just needs a web site. Will right it off on the income taxes as another loss. HE HE

-- John T.

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Kevin

462 posts in 2673 days


#6 posted 12-28-2010 01:01 AM

Not sure why you would hear many negatives things about a website. It’s part of what will drive a business. You give them information about you or your company, how long you’ve been in business, your mission statement, etc… ......

I could see a small mom/pop shop not having a website, but I believe you would benefit from having one. If you don’t have any web programming experience I would look into finding someone that could build you a simple, yet effective website from what you stated above. It will probably be 1000 and above for any descent site OR you could try the ones that let you create your own from templates.

Just do some reading and figure out your best route.

-- Williamsburg, KY

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Knothead62

2581 posts in 2429 days


#7 posted 12-28-2010 02:16 AM

I use Godaddy and a friend is a designer, www.rivergnome.com, if you are interested.

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closetguy

744 posts in 3360 days


#8 posted 12-28-2010 02:33 AM

Take a look at Pagebuzz. It’s easy, inexpensive, has a shopping cart, and interfaces to PayPal. I used it for a couple of years until I moved to Wordpress to concentrate on blogging while using Etsy for selling.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#9 posted 12-28-2010 03:15 AM

My website is out of the running as far as being parallel to your needs and wants, but I offer it up because of one thing: My designer comes from the world of printing, not electrons and pixels, and it shows in his work, IMHO. I’m talking about the mood and sense of quality that the integral colors invoke. And I use the same stuff on my blog and wherever I can.

I have not gone back to check, but I suspect I have spent over $5500 in the creation of this, and I don’t regret one dollar of it.

www.barkerbass.com

I spontaneously roll my eyes when I hear words like these: “I’m getting a web site done by my neighbor’s brother-in-law’s college roommate’s daughter’s best friend’s boyfriend.”

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

462 posts in 2673 days


#10 posted 12-28-2010 03:47 AM

If I hear that Lee, I would just shake my head and go on too.

-- Williamsburg, KY

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WoodLe

155 posts in 2264 days


#11 posted 12-28-2010 06:19 AM

If you are willing to do just a little setup yourself, Justhost.com is the one I use. They have a lot of templates to choose from and you can modify them to your taste. Prices vary depending on how many months you buy at a time. Check it out, I think they are reasonable.

-- www.largewoodslabs.com Wooster, Ohio

View Colin 's profile

Colin

93 posts in 2278 days


#12 posted 12-28-2010 09:28 AM

I just started using ipage after a terrible experience with intuit. I like ipage first and foremost because they have awsome technical support, which is a good thing for you to look for if you don’t know a lot about building a site.

Ipage has several different ways to design a site, the first for a novice which is what I use then they have wordpress which a lot of people like and it gives you some more flexibility then they also make it easy for you to do your own html coding. I might hire somebody to build me a website using the html but for now am sticking with the easy option. They also make it easy to set up a store front-type site although that is not what I am using it for.

Remember to focus on making your site simple, easy to navigate, lots of pictures and in your descriptions try to focus on why people will want your product rather than explaining the cratsmanship in detail. Best advice I got: make your website for consumers, not other woodworkers. Put all the technical info in a seperate page so people can read it if they are interested but it is not taking up space on your main pages.

-- http://www.columbiawoodscreendoors.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#13 posted 12-28-2010 03:19 PM

Web sites is sort of a hobby of mine. I don’t have any good ones to show you because most every thing that I have done is on a server that I have on my computer. I like to tinker with websites and there’s no better way to do it than on a nonpublic server. I have found that every web site I put up just gets neglected because I just like to learn about them and tinker with them. One of these days I will put a site up and maintain it.

However, it doesn’t hurt at all to know a little bit about the mechanics of one and a good place to start is this simple tutorial. After you take this tutorial you will know a fair amount about XHTML and CSS. All you need to take this course is a computer and a simple text editor like Notepad. If you really want to do this little course right then you could spend a a couple of days on it and experiment with what the guy is teaching you so that you will retain the information better.

If you get serious with it and want to learn more, then there is no better place to learn about websites than lynda.com. This site is huge but is a paid site. They literally have hundreds of comprehensive courses on anything that you can imagine about web sites, digital photography, video, film editing, Javascript, PHP, and all kinds of software packages. You can join for one month and then quit if you want. However, you can learn a lot in a month. If you stayed 90 days you could concentrate on XHTML and CSS and would be an expert on these. They also have courses on web marketing and how to get into that. They even have a comprehensive course on selling on Ebay. I’ve been a member for a long time and up until about 6 months ago I spent about 15 or 20 hours per week taking one course after another and every course was very well done and the site is owned and operated by people in the web business who are reputable and they are also honest.

Here are some more free courses http://www.w3schools.com/. However, these are not nearly as good as the video courses on Lynda.com.

Another site that I belong to is Safari Books Online- nav-global&portal=oreilly this is also a paid site and costs from around $22 to $30 or more depending on what you get. However, if you buy a lot of books about computers, programming, internet technology, electronics, and so forth it is well worth it. It’s a huge technical library and you can have up to ten technical books on your “shelf” at anyone time.

Anyways, if you get interested enough in these things these places will give you a very good practical handson education on these things.

BTW, I am not affiliated with any of these and do not get paid for saying this. I receive no benefit whatsoever. Education is expensive and if you want to learn these things these places are a bargain because you can quit at any time and even rejoin at any time. I have about 3 big shelves full of these sorts of books and books are very expensive. At some point you get tired of buying technical books. :)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View marker's profile

marker

22 posts in 2249 days


#14 posted 12-28-2010 10:12 PM

My suggestion is to begin with one of the blogging platforms, such as wordpress.com or blogger.com.
They are both completely free and quite easy to set up. The next step up would be to use wordpress at wordpress .org. This requires a hosting service and a domain. I use HostGator.com for my hosting. Wordpress can be configured in a million different ways.

With practice it should improve quite rapidly. It could even work in conjunction with, or as a sales site.

Good luck.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3116 days


#15 posted 01-04-2011 08:07 PM

You think Etsy does not get traffic? and you think you can do better
driving traffic to your own site?

Etsy gets a LOT of traffic. Sure, you have to make and sell what people
want to buy – and there’s certainly an advantage to having your own site
in order to PROMOTE an Etsy store.

Refusing to use Etsy without testing it is not an approach to marketing
handcrafted goods online I would recommend. The costs to test the Etsy
marketplace are extremely low – and it got 6 MILLION visitors in November.

In any case, if you’re going to drive all your traffic with paper media – your
website URL on business cards and brochures, then I’d recommend Wordpress –
mostly because you’ll find it easy to locate local technicians who know it
well to help you if you need it.

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