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Applications of 60RPM to 250RPM on a wood lathe?

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Forum topic by JorgeJO53M posted 07-11-2017 05:37 PM 1266 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


07-11-2017 05:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe

Greetings,

I looking forward on learning to use a wood lathe. I’ve found 2 lathes that I can afford one a little bit pricer, this one can reach lower speeds 60RPM. Which leads me to my question: What are the applications, uses or advantages for the slowest RPM (like 60 to 250) on a wood lathe?

Basic specifications for the lathe (JET JWL-1221VS): Swing over bed – 12.5”, Distance from head to tail stock – 20.5”, 1HP. I’m checking it against DELTA 46-460.

Based on my previous investigation I assume that the purpose for very low RPM could be handle big pieces like 11.25” x 20.25” (first rough cuts), maybe for finishes and sanding, for making it a jig to make spirals with router, making a jig for light work with aluminum. I can only speculate, having the comments of someone with more experience would be great!

Thanks a lot for your time!


20 replies so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

2582 posts in 3367 days


#1 posted 07-11-2017 06:53 PM

Chasing threads in wood, like boxes with screw on lids.

-- My reality check bounced...

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5328 posts in 3497 days


#2 posted 07-11-2017 07:00 PM

The slower speeds are great for sanding, drilling, and roughing badly out-of-balance pieces.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


#3 posted 07-11-2017 07:47 PM

Thank you Hairy and Dane!, you gave me new points of view to keep going with my research

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#4 posted 07-12-2017 10:45 AM

Not sure what more information anyone can help you with other than price; specs pretty straigh forward. Both the Delta and Jet lathes will serve you well.

I am partial to Jet lathes. Have own two Jet lathes, sold my 10” x 14” mini and use my 16” x 42” lathe. My big Jet has been a pleasure to turn on and handles big and small turnings can turn to 0 when want to do a damage assessment without shutting it off.

Do have an old Delta 12” x 36” modified reeves drive lathe resting on the floor of my shop. Once modified (reeves drive removed) lathe served me well for many years.

-- Bill

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Bill White

4802 posts in 3795 days


#5 posted 07-12-2017 01:29 PM

As Eddie Castelin says, “turn fast. Sand slow.”
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View hairy's profile

hairy

2582 posts in 3367 days


#6 posted 07-12-2017 02:26 PM

I use slow speed to learn a new tool. For some reason I can see it all better that way. If you want to learn how to use a skew, that’s my suggestion. Once you have the basics, start ramping up the rpm’s.

-- My reality check bounced...

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Planeman40

1034 posts in 2595 days


#7 posted 07-12-2017 02:42 PM

When turning wood of large circumference the wood is very unbalanced in its rough form in the beginning making the shaking of the lathe enough that it can “walk” across the shop floor. You need to slow the speed down to get started.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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OSU55

1423 posts in 1824 days


#8 posted 07-12-2017 03:48 PM

For cutting, surface speed, which is a product of rpm & diameter, is important. As others said, large diameter pieces need slower rpm whether roughing or finishing. Larger dia bowls and platters, like 16” and up, need speeds below 500 rpm. Research cutting speed charts.

Sanding is another reason for slower speeds, but finishing can be as well. I finish most of my turnings using the lathe to spin them. Depending on the finish type & piece dia slow speed can really help.

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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


#9 posted 07-12-2017 04:17 PM

Thanks a lot for your time and sharing your valuable experience fellows!

Just another doubt, sorry to bother:
What benefits can I get from having a 60RPM on a midi lathe?
I mean for what everyone has already told me is 250RPM good enough? Like how valuable can this non ordinary feature of 60RPM on a wood midi lathe can be? Is it a life changer, a nice to have around or a rarely used feature?

Thanks a lot for the advice so far, I’ll keep it mind.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2748 days


#10 posted 07-12-2017 04:47 PM

I use slower speeds when using my chuck and bits, for drilling. Small bits need faster speeds, but larger ones benefit from very slow speeds and slow feeding when turning spindles and knobs. My 2-cents.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


#11 posted 07-12-2017 05:05 PM


For cutting, surface speed, which is a product of rpm & diameter, is important. As others said, large diameter pieces need slower rpm whether roughing or finishing. Larger dia bowls and platters, like 16” and up, need speeds below 500 rpm. Research cutting speed charts.

Sanding is another reason for slower speeds, but finishing can be as well. I finish most of my turnings using the lathe to spin them. Depending on the finish type & piece dia slow speed can really help.

- OSU55

Thanks, I partially did my research on cutting speed charts. Partially because never looked into full size lathes, can’t afford one. I looked up to midi lathes, didn’t also looked up to midi lathes with extension table. I’ve never touched a lathe in my life neither have I looked at one in person. Although I have made my research (not absolutely extensive) but due to complete lack of experience I decided to try forums.

Making and example of a piece dimensions: 11.75” inch diameter and 42” inch long (Midi lathe with extension bed 1hp 110v/115v) What would be your aproximately ideal speed for sanding?

Thank you for sharing me your experience and time.

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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


#12 posted 07-12-2017 05:16 PM



I use slower speeds when using my chuck and bits, for drilling. Small bits need faster speeds, but larger ones benefit from very slow speeds and slow feeding when turning spindles and knobs. My 2-cents.

- HorizontalMike

Thanks Mike,
I once saw a video on youtube about drilling with an auger bit. But the guy didn’t mentioned anything about speeds. What speed would you recomend for drilling a 1” inch hole with an aprox. of 15” depth?

Thank you for your time Mike!

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Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#13 posted 07-12-2017 05:27 PM

Jorge, if you can get to a store like Woodcraft (don’t know what area you live in), it would be very helpful to see what they have. They will probably have a Jet 1221vs and a Rikon on display like the 2 stores I have been to. The two Woodcraft stores closest to me (both over 200 miles away) have some Jet 1221vs’ in their shops where they give classes.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2748 days


#14 posted 07-12-2017 05:58 PM



I use slower speeds when using my chuck and bits, for drilling. Small bits need faster speeds, but larger ones benefit from very slow speeds and slow feeding when turning spindles and knobs. My 2-cents.
- HorizontalMike

Thanks Mike,
I once saw a video on youtube about drilling with an auger bit. But the guy didn t mentioned anything about speeds. What speed would you recomend for drilling a 1” inch hole with an aprox. of 15” depth?
Thank you for your time Mike!
- JorgeJO53M

I know drill bit speed charts show 500rpm for 1in bits, but I would still go as low as 250 on my Delta 46-460 (its slowest speed). Plus, 15in is a very long hole to tap, and I would recommend using at least one, if not two, spindle steady rests when attempting this. That is if you even have such long bits in the first place. And always remember to step up in bit size very slowly, in order to minimize bit drift (going off center). Not sure you could afford to have so many bits that long… so my answer is that you will need to find another way to accomplish what you want.

Probably need to cut square stock in half, route out your half-round on each piece, glue back together, and THEN turn your spindle. And even then, I would probably use one steady rest to make it easier.
Just my 2-cents worth…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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JorgeJO53M

9 posts in 154 days


#15 posted 07-12-2017 06:16 PM

Thanks for your suggestion Hockey,

Actually I’m from Guatemala. But I really appreciate the time you took to advice me. Everyone has gave great different ideas. In Guatemala they usually sell unknown brands that I can hardly find any information on google and the prices are like the top notch tools on online stores. The known brands are very rare to find and sell for a little bit more than twice the price. Shops don’t give classes but if lucky one can get to have a brief demonstration, I did it when I was wondering if I really needed a drill press.

Nice to know how things are done outside of Guatemala though, also I didn’t know Woodcraft Im checking it’s website now. Thank you!

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