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Homemade Friction Polish

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Forum topic by Thunderhorse posted 07-10-2017 01:47 PM 904 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 181 days


07-10-2017 01:47 PM

Seems to work really well. This isn’t rocket surgery or advanced chemistry to be sure but its cheaper than buying the ready made stuff and appears to be just as effective. Picked this up off a couple of YouTube videos and I’m sure lots of folks already know it but:

1 part shellac, 1 part denatured alcohol, 1 part boiled linseed oil. shake often as it likes to separate. My wife found me some little squeeze bottles and I was good to go.

-- Fear is a Liar


14 replies so far

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 07-12-2017 03:52 PM

You may want to include what lb cut the shellac is and waxed or dewaxed.

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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 189 days


#2 posted 07-12-2017 04:27 PM

Nice looking bowls! Does the gloss to remain? Can you put food in bowls?

-- Harry, Pennsylvania

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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 181 days


#3 posted 07-12-2017 06:56 PM

As far as the shellac, its the mixed Zinsser stuff you get from the big box. I believe its a 3/1? Next step is to get flakes and mix my own.

http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/zinsser/interior-wood-finishes/bulls-eye-shellac/

The gloss stays pretty well. I should re-mount and put a few more coats on. The smaller was a heavily spalted Pecan with some punky bits in it, the other mesquite. Both are sanded down to 600 but I would like to go finer than that.

Technically is supposedly food safe but I’ve heard different opinions on that. I wouldn’t eat my cereal out of it. The finish sets up pretty hard.

-- Fear is a Liar

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mrg

786 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 07-12-2017 09:55 PM

Is this what they refer to as shine juice?

-- mrg

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TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#5 posted 07-13-2017 12:21 AM

Is this what they refer to as shine juice?

- mrg

Yes … been around for ages, popularized recently by Cap’n Eddie Castelin who calls it “O.B.’s Shine Juice” in honor of one of Eddie’s mentors, O.B. Lacoste.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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mrg

786 posts in 2839 days


#6 posted 07-13-2017 02:40 AM

I thought that was the case Gerry, just wasn’t sure of the mix. I looked at notes from a turner I took a class with and they gave me the same recipe.

-- mrg

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10642 posts in 2220 days


#7 posted 07-13-2017 05:43 AM

I used it for awhile and it’s easy, simple, but finishing and polishing is so easy on the lathe and I’ve been using regular finishes.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wildwood

2188 posts in 1974 days


#8 posted 07-13-2017 01:44 PM

Biggest benefit to making your own oil varnish blend over commercial brands can mix enough when you need it and won’t end up throwing away half a can of the stuff.

Fact the OP use shellac is not lost on me, any blend of film forming finish, oil, and thinner classified as oil varnish. Less likely to get sheen fade if make your own too.

-- Bill

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SignWave

440 posts in 2875 days


#9 posted 07-13-2017 02:19 PM

Woodturners seem to have a particular obsession for fast drying shiny finishes. I’ve experimented with this kind of finish, and it works well for drying fast and being reasonably shiny. It seems to me that once you get to a certain point, additional layers add a bit of thickness but don’t add any more shine. The big plus is that once you pull the piece from the lathe, it’d pretty much done.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View Thunderhorse's profile

Thunderhorse

35 posts in 181 days


#10 posted 07-13-2017 03:56 PM



Woodturners seem to have a particular obsession for fast drying shiny finishes. I ve experimented with this kind of finish, and it works well for drying fast and being reasonably shiny. It seems to me that once you get to a certain point, additional layers add a bit of thickness but don t add any more shine. The big plus is that once you pull the piece from the lathe, it d pretty much done.

- SignWave

That’s the appeal to me. I am under no illusion that the work I currently produce is high art. I took a long time off and got a new lathe so I am getting back up to speed. Many days, I just want to go out to the shop and make a thing, start to finish and take inside and show to my wife. Especially since I don’t have AC and its 473 degrees in south Texas this time of year.

If/when I get up to higher quality output, I would certainly look into a wider variety or finishes that are more suited to specific items or give better results.

But, bang for the buck (and time investment) this is hard to beat and a step up over Danish/BLO.

-- Fear is a Liar

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#11 posted 07-13-2017 09:27 PM

I’ve used this same friction polish quite a bit, and it is good for what you said – something quick. It is food safe after the shellac dries and any oil is wiped off (mineral oil is food safe). Its not a very durable finish and I dont use it for anything that will be handled much at all. I like using ob poly thinned 1:1 or more, and add dye to give a little color. Not quick, but much more durable. Dries faster then blo or danish oil and will build a film if desired.

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SignWave

440 posts in 2875 days


#12 posted 07-13-2017 09:39 PM



That s the appeal to me. I am under no illusion that the work I currently produce is high art. I took a long time off and got a new lathe so I am getting back up to speed. Many days, I just want to go out to the shop and make a thing, start to finish and take inside and show to my wife. Especially since I don t have AC and its 473 degrees in south Texas this time of year.

If/when I get up to higher quality output, I would certainly look into a wider variety or finishes that are more suited to specific items or give better results.

But, bang for the buck (and time investment) this is hard to beat and a step up over Danish/BLO.

- Thunderhorse


I get the appeal.

FWIW, when I bring in a piece to my wife that I used shine juice, she says it smells nice. If I do the same with danish/BLO, I am told to take it back outside. :)

I’m contemplating making a small finishing booth to keep the dust off the pieces while the oil-based finish dries, since I don’t have a clean room in my garage. Another reason to prefer a fast drying finish.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

462 posts in 1141 days


#13 posted 07-14-2017 06:40 PM

Only as a tip (from Capn Eddie IIRC).
Use a clear container and at the end of the usage mark the level with a grease pencil ( aka China Marker).
The DNA can evaporate quickly so just add more the next time to bring it back up to your line. Of course a new line at the end of each use.
I find a clear dish soap container works very well for dispensing just a few drops at the time.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

208 posts in 918 days


#14 posted 07-14-2017 10:16 PM

IMHO, I have used French Polish (now homemade) since 1948 in Jr. Hi School on a piece of Ebony. It is SO forgiving and can be applied over repaired surfaces without any blemishes showing. Any project without inclusions or voids, French Polish is my go to finish. And very inexpensive compared to so many others.

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

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