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Resawing blades?

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Forum topic by monkeykoder posted 12-23-2010 05:00 AM 1120 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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monkeykoder

19 posts in 2532 days


12-23-2010 05:00 AM

I got a simple 10” Jet Bandsaw for Christmas and while I don’t expect much I would like to be able to do some basic resawing on it. It just so happens there is a huge pile of mulberry in the back yard that my landlord would like to get rid of and I’d like to get rid of it for him (at least the small chunks…) but I’m having issues figuring out which blade I need to rip it down to boards. The blade on the saw right now is a 6tpi cheap blade that came with the saw which works fine for crosscutting but does next to nothing when trying to resaw. Any suggestions on a decent blade for resawing mulberry?


9 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3110 days


#1 posted 12-23-2010 05:09 AM

the general idea for resawing is you want the widest blade your saw can handle. That combined with a 3-4 TPI would get you to resaw.

I personally use the woodslicer blade (1/2”) from highlandwoodworking.com – it’s an amazing blade. they sell it by the inch (length) so if your saw can handle 1/2” blades you might want to give that a try.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Brandon

4151 posts in 2413 days


#2 posted 12-23-2010 05:10 AM

I recommend the Woodslicer from Highland Hardware:

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodslicer-resaw-bandsaw-blades.aspx

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View cpollock's profile

cpollock

34 posts in 2876 days


#3 posted 12-23-2010 06:14 AM

Is the wood green? If so, I’d go to timberwolf and get one of their woods designed for green wood. I don’t understand the details of sawblades, but the hook and gullet needed for green wood is different than for dry wood. II think green wood cuts better with a bigger kerf than the woodslicer provides.

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monkeykoder

19 posts in 2532 days


#4 posted 12-23-2010 08:26 AM

That’s just evil… 6-8 week wait because they don’t make blades small enough unless they’re custom :( Yeah I’d say the wood is pretty green and some of it is going to take a chainsaw to get it down to a reasonable size. Is Woodcraft a reasonable place to find blades like I’m looking for or would I be insane to shop there?

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#5 posted 12-23-2010 03:15 PM

I don’t want to discourage you, but you will need some patience to resaw anything that is very wide with a 10” band saw. I used to do some resawing on an 11” saw with a 1/2” wide blade. It went very slow and drifting was a big problem.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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monkeykoder

19 posts in 2532 days


#6 posted 12-23-2010 05:40 PM

I don’t expect great speed just enough to get by… Anything too big and I just pay my dad a visit and use his bandsaw…

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

431 posts in 2542 days


#7 posted 12-24-2010 12:39 AM

Trying to resaw with a 10” bandsaw is in my opinion a waste of valuable shop time. If you fathers bandsaw is a 14” or larger you could get the job done so much quicker using his saw. The cut quality also would probably be a lot better. Find out what your dad’s favorite resaw blade is, buy him one and spend a few hours of quality father/son time together.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8301 posts in 3109 days


#8 posted 12-24-2010 06:36 AM

Use a 3 TPI blade with a lot of set to the teeth. Few teeth and a lot
of set helps with the damp wood.

I wouldn’t use a woodslicer for green wood. Too little set and a costly
blade to boot.

An alterative is to rive and sticker the wood. Riving is how they did it in
the old days.

View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 2532 days


#9 posted 12-27-2010 06:07 AM

Well at least I know the motor is capable of re-sawing I tried it out on some harder wood and it performed quite well for it’s size.

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