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Forum topic by Dan Higham posted 07-09-2017 03:54 PM 478 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan Higham

24 posts in 304 days


07-09-2017 03:54 PM

Hi everyone,

On a recent trip to England, I took possession of my grandfathers old sorby block plane, it was probably his fathers before him! I sharpened the blade pretty well but I think I have sharpened it at the wrong angle, can anyone give any advice on the angle I should be using and in which order to put the blade and wedge in?

Thanks, Dan.


9 replies so far

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18605 posts in 2517 days


#1 posted 07-09-2017 05:42 PM

May look up “Coffin Smoothers”

Angle: ~ 25 degrees…..bevel goes down

Install both the iron and the wedge together. As you set the iron for the cut, wedge will follow along.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Don W's profile

Don W

18520 posts in 2401 days


#2 posted 07-10-2017 11:17 AM

As long as it’s something close to 25 degrees you should be good. The angle isn’t all that important..

What grit did you sharpen to and what was your technique?

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View OleGrump's profile

OleGrump

132 posts in 178 days


#3 posted 07-10-2017 12:53 PM

As noted, insert the wedge and iron at the same time, then gently tap the wedge to set it. If you need to adjust the iron lower, gently tap only the iron. It will move downward. A little trial and error will get it where you want it. You probably already know this, but just to be sure: When removing the wedge and iron, hold the plane upside down and tap the HEEL of the plane with a wooden mallet. They’ll come right out.
Isn’t it amazing how long these great old wooden bodied planes last? And it’s really special when they have family history attached to them. I have a fore plane which belonged to my Great-grandfather’s brother, which he bough second-hand sometime in the 1880s. This plane was used to build the house that my father was born in, back in 1918.
I hope you’ll let us know how you make out with this heirloom plane!

-- OleGrump

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4475 posts in 2185 days


#4 posted 07-10-2017 12:56 PM

That is a coffin smoother, rather than a block plane. Good advice, above.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Dan Higham's profile

Dan Higham

24 posts in 304 days


#5 posted 07-10-2017 01:23 PM



As long as it s something close to 25 degrees you should be good. The angle isn t all that important..

What grit did you sharpen to and what was your technique?

- Don W

I sharpened it with a 1000/4000 grit wet stone, to 25 and then a 30 degree micro bevel.

Thanks for the advice everyone, I really appreciate it. I might go back and re-sharpen with out the micro bevel. The only issue i’m having is that I can’t seem to stop it from catching on the material! I’ll let y’all know how I get on :-)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3931 days


#6 posted 07-10-2017 03:15 PM

Photos of the blade would be useful.

Catching on the edge of the blade?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18605 posts in 2517 days


#7 posted 07-10-2017 08:19 PM

Going against the grain?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Loren's profile

Loren

9606 posts in 3482 days


#8 posted 07-10-2017 10:13 PM

Mostly with hand planes you’ll want a quite
fine cut. There’s a range of perhaps .5mm
of blade protrusion between too little (no
cut) and too much (plane digs in). This is
one reason I don’t use wood planes much,
because every day you pick them up the
body has changed size a little and the iron
will need re-adjusting.

View Don W's profile

Don W

18520 posts in 2401 days


#9 posted 07-10-2017 10:29 PM

I’ve never had luck stopping at 4000. So your either taking to much at once or your not sharp.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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