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Forum topic by mangorockfish posted 07-08-2017 09:07 PM 1082 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mangorockfish

18 posts in 189 days


07-08-2017 09:07 PM

Been asking around about how to really tell if my table saw’s blades are dull. Have decided to replace the blades on both saws. One of the saws is a 113 series 10” Craftsman and the other is the 315 series. One is at my regular house and the other is at the vacation house, so probably will get two of the same. Most of what I’ll be doing is ripping as I cross-cut with my miter saw and radial arm saw. So now, what kind of blades do I need, brand, tooth count, where to buy, etc.? What about a good radial arm saw blade to do everything for a 10” Craftsman also? Thanks


25 replies so far

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ArtMann

688 posts in 654 days


#1 posted 07-09-2017 01:10 AM

I don’t have a catalog in front of me so I can’t give you a model number but I like the 30 tooth Glue Line Rip blade made by Freud. It is the one with the red non-stick coating. In your case, I would strongly recommend the narrow kerf version. I used a Craftsman 113 series table saw for about 20 years and when I replaced the regular blade with a thin kerf one, it was like I replaced the motor with a higher power one.

I used to have a Craftsman radial arm saw. It had this tendency to self feed to the point it would stall itself out. I sold it rather than deal with the problem but I hear the crosscut blades with a negative hook angle work much better.

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Madmark2

373 posts in 427 days


#2 posted 07-09-2017 03:01 AM

Freud LU83R010 great combo blade and glintingly sharp.

M

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Rick_M

10638 posts in 2218 days


#3 posted 07-09-2017 05:04 AM

Generally if you are in doubt that your blades are sharp, there is no doubt, they are dull. (although sometimes you can get more time with a good cleaning)

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#4 posted 07-09-2017 05:25 AM



Generally if you are in doubt that your blades are sharp, there is no doubt, they are dull. (although sometimes you can get more time with a good cleaning)

- Rick M

Rick’s right about the cleaning. Get a cleaning solution (I use CMT Formula 2050, but there are other good ones as well), and follow the instructions. It’ll make a big difference.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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MrRon

4496 posts in 3082 days


#5 posted 07-09-2017 03:51 PM

I find when the blade starts to bog down, that indicates the blade is no longer sharp. This takes into account the blade is clean and not gummed up. A clean, sharp blade will crosscut without leaving raised splinters at the bottom of the cut.

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Planeman40

1035 posts in 2599 days


#6 posted 07-10-2017 02:47 PM

I’m going to be burned at the stake for saying this, but the BEST circular saw blade I have ever had over the past 55 years of using a table saw is the one I bought at Harbor Freight. This is it: https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-96t-finishing-circular-saw-blade-62730.html

It is used on my $4,000 Austrian-made Hammer 48” x 48” sliding table saw (12” blade size). I had Forrest Blades special punch the arbor hole to fit). There is a 10” blade available. Its a long story how I came to use this blade, but this is for another time.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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dday

129 posts in 1268 days


#7 posted 07-10-2017 04:43 PM

I agree with the HF blade suggestion. As a hobbyiest wood worker, it seems more efficient to me to replace a blade that’s dull ( after a few cleanings ) than to try and sharpen it myself or send it off to be sharpened and possible pay more that it’s worth to do so ( with shipping and cost). These are very servicable blades and very reasonably priced. If you buy them one at a time, you can get 20% off on top of the great price.

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Rick_M

10638 posts in 2218 days


#8 posted 07-10-2017 05:00 PM

Planeman, what makes it the best?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ocean's profile

ocean

46 posts in 672 days


#9 posted 07-10-2017 05:16 PM

I have a 113 craftsman also and my one blade I use most of the time is a thin kerf 10” 60 tooth ATG for fine cuts in solid wood and ply. It has a good life span and is a reasonable cost ($36). Go with less teeth for construction grade lumber. You can find it at HD.

-- Bob, FL Keys

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 779 days


#10 posted 07-10-2017 07:48 PM

I found an article on cleaning blades a few weeks ago. I think it was one of the magazines – FWW or PWW – don’t remember which, but they did a test on cleaning solutions “designed” for cleaning blades and then some household products they felt would do the job. The designated blade cleaning solutions did their job as expected, but Simple Green and laundry detergent did the job equally well.

I have a bunch of blades that need to go to a sharpening service. There’s one not too far from my house which charges $15/blade which will make it worthwhile for me to do. Now I just have to do it.

OP give your blades a good cleaning and then maybe look in your area for a sharpening service. Also, I used to use Freud blades almost exclusively, mixed in with some CMT, but after picking up a Forrest WW II blade, I think that’s where my money is going. They’re located in New Jersey and not too far for me to drive to drop off blades for reconditioning. They’ll replace chipped/missing teeth and sharpen, all for a reasonable price, considering replacement is much more expensive.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View jonah's profile

jonah

1471 posts in 3137 days


#11 posted 07-10-2017 08:18 PM

I don’t see the appeal of throwing away a perfectly good saw blade rather than paying $15 to sharpen it. Local places charge about that, and if you find a good one, you don’t need to mail it anywhere.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1568 days


#12 posted 07-10-2017 10:13 PM



Been asking around about how to really tell if my table saw s blades are dull.
Have decided to replace the blades on both saws. One of the saws is a 113 series 10” Craftsman and the other is the 315 series. One is at my regular house and the other is at the vacation house, so probably will get two of the same. Most of what I ll be doing is ripping as I cross-cut with my miter saw and radial arm saw. So now, what kind of blades do I need, brand, tooth count, where to buy, etc.? What about a good radial arm saw blade to do everything for a 10” Craftsman also? Thanks

- mangorockfish


If it’s carbide, look at the edges of the teeth. If you can see a line, the blade is dull. If lines are not visible, it’s most likely still sharp. Another way to tell if it’s sharp, rake a tooth on a finger/thumb nail. If it raises a burr, you blade is sharp. If not, it won’t do anything. Now that is said, make sure the blade is in your hand and not still on the arbor.

Above is for carbide only. Steel is another story. I don’t have any words of wisdom on steel blades as I never used any in my 40+ years as a cabinetmaker/wouldworker. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Nezzerscape

30 posts in 702 days


#13 posted 07-11-2017 05:32 PM

I use to love Freud, but after using Forrest blades (on both TS and radial arm saw) I would not go back. I have not tried anything from HF though.

View EricLew's profile

EricLew

189 posts in 1204 days


#14 posted 07-12-2017 05:09 AM

I have had great results with the Irwin Marples blades. Lowe’s and Amazon sell them, I have a 24 tooth rip, 50 tooth combo, and 80 tooth crosscut, and recommend all 3, they range in price from about $35 – $50 The 80 tooth makes incredibly clean cuts in plywood.

-- I love the smell of coffee in the morning, and sawdust in the afternoon

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1035 posts in 2599 days


#15 posted 07-12-2017 03:18 PM

”Planeman, what makes it the best?”

I judge a saw blade on how it performs. With this Harbor Freight blade this is what I experienced.

1. The blade, a 12” 96-tooth carbide blade, ran dead true on the arbor and was balanced with no vibration at all.

2. The cuts were so smooth that no further finishing was needed on most cuts.

3. The carbide blade tips have stayed very sharp after 2 1/2 years use in a much used home workshop.

4. As mine is a 12 ” saw, it can cut a 2×4 lengthwise in the 4” dimention. I have done this a number of times with no problems from the blade. No heating distortion.

What more could you ask?

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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