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What finish to use?

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Forum topic by USMC47 posted 07-08-2017 07:43 PM 424 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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USMC47

33 posts in 229 days


07-08-2017 07:43 PM

Experts, I recently refinished a red oak Park bench. Once stained with some min wax, I put that sucker outside and it immediately faded and got some water stains from the sprinklers.

I assume the wood absorbed some of the color and I can apply another coat.

I’ll do that.

Once I do that, what finish can I put on it to protect it from the elements but still have it OK to sit on?

Thanks!

John

-- The deadliest weapon in the world...is a Marine and his rifle.


13 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2090 days


#1 posted 07-08-2017 09:34 PM

John, it is too late now, but red oak is not the best choice of woods to use for out door projects. You should get the feet off the ground so water doesn’t infiltrate causing rot. Most (all) stains are light sensitive. Spar varnish with heavy UV inhibitors is usually recommended for out door use. Epifanes is a good one, but there are many. However, you need to be prepared for annual maintenance in any case. HTH

-- Art

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chrisstef

17016 posts in 2839 days


#2 posted 07-08-2017 09:37 PM

I like general finishes exterior 450 personally.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 735 days


#3 posted 07-08-2017 10:32 PM

Teak oil every 6 months.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4755 posts in 2326 days


#4 posted 07-09-2017 01:56 PM

To more or less echo what Art said, that’s the wrong wood….but you have what you have. So I’ll second the suggestions to use either Epifanes (or other true marine spar varnish, nothing from the box store) or even the GF 450. I’ll add one other choice: paint, but without tint added. The exterior oil paint bases made for the dark colors (usually #4, maybe # 5, or just “deep base”) will look very much like an oil based varnish once cured and they contain all the exterior protection you will need. If this is of interest, there's more info here (the article is a little dated with the finish names, and oil based paint is getting harder and harder to find).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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USMC47

33 posts in 229 days


#5 posted 07-09-2017 02:00 PM

No wood is on the ground. It’s just the slats that you sit on and lean back against.

Great info as usual. I reckon if I never made mistakes, I wouldn’t be here. Salt of the earth type guys in here.

-- The deadliest weapon in the world...is a Marine and his rifle.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2140 posts in 3703 days


#6 posted 07-09-2017 02:02 PM

I respectively disagree on a spar varnish ..my experience has shown that film finishes dont hold up well exterior, sprar or not, ..We have been involved in alot of testing since we had a disaster with a spar vernish.
A penetrating oil seems to be the best .. we have settled on one called One Time , its been on a plywood trailer bed for about 4 years, and while ready for another coat it has held up well
horizontal surfaces dont hold up as long as verticle.
Red oak as stated is a poor exterior wood… coat the feet bottoms with epoxy and get some glides to keep it off the ground will help

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builtinbkyn

1918 posts in 773 days


#7 posted 07-09-2017 02:06 PM

I have to say I’m sold on Cabot’s Australian Timber Oil for woods being exposed to the elements. I used it on a pergola I built from construction grade lumber and it’s still beading water and looking great. I’ll give it another coat at the end of the season, but after a pretty harsh Winter and rainy Spring/early Summer, it’s doing fine.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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USMC47

33 posts in 229 days


#8 posted 07-09-2017 07:14 PM

Ok, how about for the next one? What’s a good outdoor hardwood?

-- The deadliest weapon in the world...is a Marine and his rifle.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

660 posts in 1052 days


#9 posted 07-09-2017 08:08 PM

red oak really isnt bad to use for outdoors. its been used for years and years for railroad ties and fence posts.
treated/protected /maintained properly, it will last a very long time.

white oak is even better.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4755 posts in 2326 days


#10 posted 07-09-2017 08:34 PM

White oak is probably the most common on used for outdoor use.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2090 days


#11 posted 07-09-2017 10:26 PM

John, in addition to white oak, there is black locust, cedar, redwood, cypress and many (maybe most) exotics, such as ipe. It depends what is available in San Diego.

-- Art

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3626 posts in 2142 days


#12 posted 07-09-2017 10:59 PM



red oak really isnt bad to use for outdoors. its been used for years and years for railroad ties and fence posts.
treated/protected /maintained properly, it will last a very long time.

white oak is even better.

- tomsteve

But who wants to use furniture with all the chemicals it to preserve those rail ties?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View USMC47's profile

USMC47

33 posts in 229 days


#13 posted 07-10-2017 12:11 AM



John, in addition to white oak, there is black locust, cedar, redwood, cypress and many (maybe most) exotics, such as ipe. It depends what is available in San Diego.

- AandCstyle

Art, that’s good info there.

-- The deadliest weapon in the world...is a Marine and his rifle.

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