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Forum topic by woodsmith1 posted 12-21-2010 03:01 PM 2793 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodsmith1

58 posts in 2416 days


12-21-2010 03:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Does anyone know where to find English oak for sale? Either online or locally in Wisconsin? Does it grow in the states or is it actually from England? I love the look of it and would like to use it in some projects.


11 replies so far

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Mark Shymanski

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#1 posted 12-21-2010 03:36 PM

If we use English oak here in Canada we have to translate it to French…one of the joys of a bilingual country :-)

Sorry, couildn’t resist this one….well it sounded funny in my head before I typed it LOL!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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racerglen

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#2 posted 12-21-2010 05:24 PM

A wee bit from a wood website.. Aparently there are “English” Oaks in North America !

The English Oak, Quercus Robur, is an extremely long lived deciduous tree native to Europe, western Asia and northern Africa. Specimens in England, where they prolifically populate the forests, are revered as shade trees and are planted in the discerning country landscape setting for its beautiful large canopied silhouette, have been dated 700-800 years old. Some of them are even famous enough to be given names and protection. One estimated to be 1000 years old in Lincolnshire, England is named the Bowthorpe Oak and is practically treated as royalty.

Though the English Oak had been brought to North America by English colonists back in the seventeenth century they have not overwhelmed the forests here and only small sections can be said to have English Oaks “escaped” into the wild. Pity, as they are an extraordinary and majestic tree.

Canada and the Northern United States have since widely planted the English Oak due to its beauty and, to a lesser extent, its cold hardiness. It resides quite happily, though perhaps not perfectly safely, in USDA Zones 4-8 . Some mature trees has been known to be killed by a particularly cold winter freeze. Its preferred zone is 5-6 where it typically grows about a foot per year.

The English Oak can grow to 140 feet in height and has a rounded canopy spreading to 80 plus feet wide when given the room. It tends to be a bit smaller in cultivation but still quite huge. It is therefore not suited to the typical suburban yard. The bark is rough and a greyish brown color with deep vertical groves running the length. The roots go deep with none breaking the surface. Good for those who crave a smooth lawn underneath trees. This tree likes the wet and heavy soil either acidic or alkaline. Any lengthy drought will likely do it harm. It likes full sun but will not do well in the hot, dry summers of the middle and southwestern United States and in the humid southeast the fungus Powdery Mildew can be a problem.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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okwoodshop

448 posts in 2636 days


#3 posted 12-21-2010 11:34 PM

Enough BS, Go to hearnehardwoods.com WHEW!

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woodsmith1

58 posts in 2416 days


#4 posted 12-21-2010 11:44 PM

LOL thanks.

And thanks for the info on the tree as well.

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pommy

1697 posts in 3152 days


#5 posted 12-21-2010 11:48 PM

how much do you need

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3444 days


#6 posted 01-04-2011 06:03 AM

hey … I love quartersawn white oak and it doesn’t matter to me where its from >grinz<

Does English quartersawn have the same tiger stripes?

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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woodsmith1

58 posts in 2416 days


#7 posted 01-05-2011 11:34 PM

I don’t currently “NEED” any. Just like the way it looks and was wondering if it’s availible locally, just in case. But thanks for asking Andy.

I also like quartersawn white. I haven’t seen the English Oak in quartersawn. Sorry

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okwoodshop

448 posts in 2636 days


#8 posted 01-06-2011 12:56 AM

Pommy’ I will take a canoe full. Now where did I put my paddle?? LOL

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Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3444 days


#9 posted 01-06-2011 01:22 AM

Do you live near Kettle Moraine Park or Milwaukee? There are some good sawmills there.

Photo of English Oak and a link to a boat load more.
http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/oak,%20english%20brown.htm

I’ve seen a lot oak that looks just like photos in this link. Looks like there is extreme grain variation in that type. I would imagine a English Oak tree would be easier to identify by its leaf rather then the wood grain. In my travels I’ve seen a lot of oak that looks just like the linked photos. Must be somewhat common.

I buy my oak at FML. They carry thousands of boards of oak … in all thickness’s … standing in racks

Worlds largest place >grin< ... I think

http://www.frankmiller.com/retail_store/index.html

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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woodsmith1

58 posts in 2416 days


#10 posted 01-06-2011 04:11 AM

Well I haven’t heard of Kettle Moraine so I would have to say Milwaukee. Although I’m actually closest to Madison being 30 minutes away.

I have worked with english oak at a cabinet shop I was employeed at. It is very dark without any finish on it. I’m sure a person could get REAL close to the look with the right stain or dye on regular oak. Or maybe even fuming, but something tells me the origanal would be more my liking.

There are some great pics on that link you posted DaN. Makes me want it more! :)

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Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3444 days


#11 posted 01-07-2011 12:40 AM

There is a satellite version of a saw mill in south Milwaukee. Kettle Moraine Hardwoods. Might be worth your drive.

Some the best and least expensive I’ve bought were back-in-the-day in Wisconsin. My dinner table and chairs is made from dark white oak that I found at a rural hardwood lumber/saw mill. Small place east of Waukesha.

There are many types of oak trees. The saw mills grade them as red or white. I know English Oak is found in many places.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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