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36-600 DELTA 10" TABLE SAW

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Forum topic by bshaff posted 07-08-2017 06:50 PM 548 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bshaff

20 posts in 627 days


07-08-2017 06:50 PM

I have a delta 36-600 10” table saw and need to know why it trips the GFCI instead of the load switch on the saw when I start it. It just started doing this after 2 and 1/2 years of being on this circuit.

Does anyone know how to take the motor off of this saw?

-- Barry


13 replies so far

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Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#1 posted 07-08-2017 07:10 PM

Could be several reasons.Gfci is bad, your extension cord is bad or undersized or too long.Your blade is dull your cut is very thick.Your saw is tired and worn out.
So you’ll have to try a different outlet,a shorter thicker cord,new blade etc.
If all of these don’t change anything then start saving for a new saw.

-- Aj

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#2 posted 07-08-2017 07:36 PM

GFCI circuits are known to ‘nuisance trip’ with inductive loads… and they will get worse over time. Absent any of the other problems mentioned by Aj above, I’d swap out the GFCI with a new one… or get rid of it entirely.

The motor should be held on with just a few bolts. If you yank it, it would probably be a good idea to replace the bearings and clean it out, as they will get filled with sawdust and other crud.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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mrg

780 posts in 2832 days


#3 posted 07-08-2017 07:52 PM

Sounds like a bad GFCI. A lot of tools recommend to not use a GFCI receptical because it may trip it. My Nova DVR lathe has it in the manual. I still run it on a GFCI because code in my town is a basement must have these outlets. I have no issues but if it started tripping I would change the outlet.

-- mrg

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Smirak

38 posts in 351 days


#4 posted 07-09-2017 12:10 AM

Bad gfci…just replaced mine Wednesday due to my planer tripping mine after a few months. Wasn’t plugged into the gfci, but the plug I was using was tied to the gfci.

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jonah

1442 posts in 3131 days


#5 posted 07-09-2017 12:27 AM

Many GFCI outlets – especially cheaper ones – are notoriously unreliable. I had to replace the one in our bathroom in our old house twice, and the most current that thing ever saw was a hair curler (~8 amps).

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Ted78

319 posts in 1833 days


#6 posted 07-09-2017 12:45 AM

Before you replace the gfci outlet do check the ground and make sure the outlet is not just doing it’s job.
As to why it trips the gfci instead of the circuit breaker,the two are measuring entirely different things. The circuit breaker measures how much current is being drawn and if it goes over that amount the circuit trips, as opposed to the wires going to or in the tool heating up and causing a fire. GFCI or Ground fault circuit interrupters. don’t measure the current the current the appliance is using, but instead monitor the current from the ‘hot’ side of the outlet equals the current entering the ‘neutral’ side of the outlet. Nothing to do with the third grounding prong by the way. If they don’t match electricity is going somewhere it shouldn’t, like maybe through you, or maybe just through the third prong grounding plug, either way it shouldn’t be. The circuit breaker keeps your house from burning down, the later keeps you from getting electrocuted.

-- Ted

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bshaff

20 posts in 627 days


#7 posted 07-09-2017 10:40 PM

Thanks for the replies. I know it is not my GFCI that is bad. I also know that the brushes in the motor are eaten up real bad. I checked them about a year ago and they were very very good but now they are almost gone.
I looked in the holes where they go and see that one of the splines on the internal shaft is bent and I suspect that has caused the brushes to be eaten up. I am not using the correct terms here so forgive me. I tried to get the motor apart and can not do it. I got it off the machine and took off the c clip on the large splined wheel where the belt goes but I can not get the large wheel off. I have pried it and used different means to try to get it off and it will not come. I hope I can get it apart and somehow fix the bent part in the inside.
Any ideas?
Barry

-- Barry

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jonah

1442 posts in 3131 days


#8 posted 07-10-2017 12:02 AM

My first table saw was one like yours, possibly even the same model. I had problems with it, and took it to Sawcenter in Springfield, MA. They basically told me to throw it out. It’s a universal motor saw. Once the motor is gone, good luck. They said they wouldn’t even take it apart if I paid them, and I don’t blame them.

Look into replacing the saw, maybe a 113 series Craftsman or Ridgid contractor saw? Those generally run between $150-$300 for a decent saw.

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#9 posted 07-10-2017 12:16 AM

That isn’t a universal motor like those typically found on the cheaper saws… it’s actually belt driven, but the belt is internal. Once you get the clip off the shaft, the pulley should come off, but may be stubborn… If you don’t have a puller, try supporting the motor by the pulley, like on a vice or similar, then tapping the shaft down. Be sure to have something underneath to catch the rest of the motor once it separates.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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bshaff

20 posts in 627 days


#10 posted 07-12-2017 03:48 PM

Thanks folk.
I got the saw apart but it was a real bear. The copper (looks like # 217 in the diagram) had a spline in it that had bent out of shape thus the brushes got ruined.
Put the spine back in and put it on my lathe and filed and sanded it smooth.
Put the saw back together and have ordered some new brushes for it. The bearings seem real good so I will see when the brushes come how it works.

-- Barry

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bshaff

20 posts in 627 days


#11 posted 07-15-2017 11:13 PM

I tried the new brushes today and the saw made an awful noise. I looked inside the motor and the copper spline is back out again.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to fix it so It will stay put. Should I take it to a motor repair shop and see if they can fix it?

Thanks

-- Barry

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toolie

2094 posts in 2461 days


#12 posted 07-16-2017 10:35 AM


My first table saw was one like yours, possibly even the same model. I had problems with it, and took it to Sawcenter in Springfield, MA. They basically told me to throw it out. It s a universal motor saw. Once the motor is gone, good luck. They said they wouldn t even take it apart if I paid them, and I don t blame them.

Look into replacing the saw, maybe a 113 series Craftsman or Ridgid contractor saw? Those generally run between $150-$300 for a decent saw.

- jonah

+1

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#13 posted 07-16-2017 01:19 PM

Your table saw in good running condition is probably worth $100-$150. Unless you have an attachment to it, I’d say start looking for a replacement contractor’s saw.

I picked up my Rigid TS2412 for $175. I’m very happy with it, it runs like a champ and has a good fence. From what I’ve read, the TS2412 is the same as the Craftsman 113.

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