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Is this doable? Joint a beam?

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Forum topic by rmh09 posted 07-06-2017 02:39 PM 567 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rmh09

15 posts in 2523 days


07-06-2017 02:39 PM

I have a glulam beam—5 1/8” thick 22” wide and 78” long. I want to use this for a work bench top. After prepping it, I want to add an apron around it. Unfortunately, the length of one side has a round over. That means it will not fit flush with the apron. I have a grizzly 455 10” jointer. Is it possible to just run this one side through/over the jointer 3 or so times (with some help)? My concern is that the beam is VERY heavy, I’d guess something like 150lb.
Thanks!

-- Randy


15 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1786 days


#1 posted 07-06-2017 02:58 PM

Sounds like a very difficult job to pull off. You could consider removing the round over by making a rabbet with a router and filling with a piece of stock.

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Loren

9606 posts in 3481 days


#2 posted 07-06-2017 02:59 PM

Sure. Build an outfeed table for the jointer.
I’ve never done anything that heavy on
a jointer.

You can feed it on the infeed using something
like a roller stand but the outfeed table should
be as perfectly aligned to the the jointer as
possible.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

56 posts in 609 days


#3 posted 07-06-2017 03:10 PM

And the gluelam will ruin your knives, unless they are carbide.
I would do what Kazooman said.

View ThistleDown's profile

ThistleDown

44 posts in 551 days


#4 posted 07-06-2017 03:40 PM

+1 I have done OSB glued up this way to make my own beams. Sharp knifes are needed in the jointer, but never ruined any.


Sure. Build an outfeed table for the jointer.
I ve never done anything that heavy on
a jointer.

You can feed it on the infeed using something
like a roller stand but the outfeed table should
be as perfectly aligned to the the jointer as
possible.

- Loren


-- My biggest fear is that when I am gone, my wife will sell my tools for what I told her I paid for them.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3931 days


#5 posted 07-06-2017 03:56 PM

Hand plane worth considering? Move the tool across the wood, not the wood across the tool.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#6 posted 07-06-2017 04:04 PM

+ 1 with Kazooman.

-- Aj

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4491 posts in 3077 days


#7 posted 07-06-2017 04:56 PM

Another +1 with Kazooman.

View rmh09's profile

rmh09

15 posts in 2523 days


#8 posted 07-06-2017 05:43 PM

Thanks everyone! I am not sure what would ruin the knives, the edge to be jointed is just pine. The beam is glued up 2×6’s (I think). I was most concerned about moving something that heavy across the machine. And that’s also why I wanted to “consider” using the jointer, because I am not good with hand planes yet. Hand planing 6 1/2 feet down 1/4” doesn’t sound like ….fun. Anyway I appreciate your input!

-- Randy

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waho6o9

8026 posts in 2410 days


#9 posted 07-06-2017 05:48 PM

Cut a rabbet and glue in a filler piece

+1 with Kazooman

View jonah's profile

jonah

1443 posts in 3132 days


#10 posted 07-06-2017 06:44 PM

I’m with everybody else. Rabbet it.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

56 posts in 609 days


#11 posted 07-06-2017 07:23 PM



Thanks everyone! I am not sure what would ruin the knives, the edge to be jointed is just pine. The beam is glued up 2×6 s (I think). I was most concerned about moving something that heavy across the machine. And that s also why I wanted to “consider” using the jointer, because I am not good with hand planes yet. Hand planing 6 1/2 feet down 1/4” doesn t sound like ….fun. Anyway I appreciate your input!

- rmh09

I thought it was like a piece of plywood.

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rmh09

15 posts in 2523 days


#12 posted 07-06-2017 07:29 PM

Begrudgingly ….the overwhelming recommendations are for a rabbit and a filler piece. I hate it when I think I have a “good” idea that’s only slightly dangerous. Now that I know, I have to listen to good advice and I am fairly sure that I will do a rabbit and filler. Thanks again!

-- Randy

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#13 posted 07-06-2017 07:49 PM

It’s the glue in engineered beams that’s hard on steel knives.Even if you can stay away from it most likely your beam has been siting on the ground and has dirt or sand embedded on the face and that’s a knife killer too.
Good luck and stay dangerous I meant safe.:)

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3633 posts in 2143 days


#14 posted 07-06-2017 08:00 PM

Just an idea.

Perhaps you could take a router with a rabbet bit and rabbet out the round overs and glue a square back in. You could even use a colorful contrasting wood if that appeals to you or use a matching wood.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2778 days


#15 posted 07-06-2017 10:12 PM

My friend sent is kid over to learn some woodworking tricks (what a fool). His project was to restore a 12’ long, redwood picnic table made from an old wine vat. One of the seat joints had failed and I had to cut it apart at the center, run it through the jointer then put it back together. The kid was scarce (surprise), so I did it by myself. The two 1-1/2” x 6” x 12’ pieces went back together nicely.

Had I had to do it with your beasts, I think it would have been even easier, since it would hold itself down and would only need support at the ends and when moving them back and forth. Of course, the weight would have called for two people to move it back to start each time.

Because yours is so wide, a temporary fence would be in order too.

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