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Here I try again, first project video.

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Forum topic by thechipcarver posted 07-06-2017 03:48 AM 903 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thechipcarver

193 posts in 1411 days


07-06-2017 03:48 AM

Well, I posted my first project video. Check it out, tell me what you think. I will admit it’s not the best, but I have seen worst.

Making a wooden crate.

-- While teaching a class, a gentlemen once asked me: "When chip carving an intricate design, what do you do when you are almost finished and the wood breaks off?" I replied "Cover the kids ears."


7 replies so far

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Rick_M

10606 posts in 2213 days


#1 posted 07-06-2017 05:36 AM

Since you asked for feedback ;) Sound: I’m sure you know it already but you really need a microphone. Even if your camera doesn’t accept a mic, you can get a lavalier mic and plug it into your phone. Failing that, maybe speak louder and try to annunciate better until you get a mic. Lighting: Nice and bright, easy to see. Pacing, a tad slow but that’s personal preference. The steps were well laid out and it was always clear what portion of the project you were working on. Overall it’s very good for a first video.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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SignWave

440 posts in 2868 days


#2 posted 07-06-2017 06:25 AM

Pat yourself on the back for getting your first project video done. You have a clear introduction of what the project is about, a step-by-step demonstration of the tasks, and a nice summary/outro. You obviously have grasp of editing the clips together in a way that tells the story of the project. I also agree with Rick that you have good lighting that makes it easy to see what you’re doing.

I also agree that a bit of work on the sound will help. In the workshop shots, a lavalier microphone that plugs into the camera will have a lot of benefit, for very little cost. It will make your voice a bit louder and easier to understand, and also cut down on some of the room noise. Something like an ATR3350 (or similar, just one possible offering) will sound clear and has a long cord to reach the camera.

One last thing, in the intro, I suggest that you introduce yourself and the channel name when you’re describing what the project is about, and include it in either a title page or on the lower-thirds graphic that you use. This will help tie your videos together and create a “brand” for your channel. Easy enough to add in post. :)

Looking forward to seeing some of your carving videos, too!

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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thechipcarver

193 posts in 1411 days


#3 posted 07-06-2017 11:08 AM

Thanks for the feedback guys. Well, believe it or not I did use microphone. The shots of me talking in the workshop does sound like I’m not using a mic. I’m thinking it has something to do with the acoustics in the basement. There is no insulation anywhere in the shop. So I’m thinking that the sound is bouncing all over the place causing the poor sound quality. I also have to work on my presentation and speech. I never liked public speaking, so this is a way to get out of my comfort zone.

Thanks again for the tips and for watching.

-- While teaching a class, a gentlemen once asked me: "When chip carving an intricate design, what do you do when you are almost finished and the wood breaks off?" I replied "Cover the kids ears."

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SignWave

440 posts in 2868 days


#4 posted 07-06-2017 03:25 PM

What kind of microphone, and where was it located?

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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thechipcarver

193 posts in 1411 days


#5 posted 07-06-2017 03:36 PM

It’s a Boya BY M-1. When filming in the workshop, it’s was located right above my head.

-- While teaching a class, a gentlemen once asked me: "When chip carving an intricate design, what do you do when you are almost finished and the wood breaks off?" I replied "Cover the kids ears."

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Rick_M

10606 posts in 2213 days


#6 posted 07-06-2017 04:31 PM

Ah, well lavalier mics are omni-directional and meant to be worn, in the video it sounds just like a camera mic. You might need a directional mic if you have it on a boom arm or suspended.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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SignWave

440 posts in 2868 days


#7 posted 07-06-2017 05:40 PM

Yep, an omni lavalier microphone will work best when clipped 6 to 12 inches from your mouth. It particularly needs to be close if you’re trying to minimize room noise or other sounds. Seems like a small difference, but it matters a lot. Easy enough to experiment to find the location that sounds good and doesn’t pick up handling breath noise, noise from clothes, etc.

FWIW, I wouldn’t worry about the microphone being visible in a woodworking video. Just find a way to use it that sounds good and doesn’t trip you up.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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