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Source for air dried quarter sawn oak?

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Forum topic by RipFence posted 07-05-2017 07:40 PM 424 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RipFence

67 posts in 2526 days


07-05-2017 07:40 PM

Hello All:
My attempts to seal ends and reduce soak time are not going well.
Anyone know of a source for air dried quarter sawn white oak that will let me pick and choose boards and ship?
Thanks,
Jim


8 replies so far

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ArtMann

677 posts in 649 days


#1 posted 07-05-2017 09:41 PM

Where are you located? Perhaps a nearby member can help you locate a source. It doesn’t seem like an easy thing to choose boards from somewhere that requires a shipment. If you were near me, I could give you an address and phone number.

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Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#2 posted 07-05-2017 09:48 PM

FWIW, I steam bend kiln dried wood with
no problems. All the advice that one should
only bend air dried wood is misinformed.

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RipFence

67 posts in 2526 days


#3 posted 07-05-2017 10:04 PM

Thanks Loren. I’d be delighted to hear any tips you might be willing to share!

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RipFence

67 posts in 2526 days


#4 posted 07-05-2017 10:05 PM

Thanks ArtMann, I’m in Salt Lake City UT.

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Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#5 posted 07-05-2017 10:24 PM

You really ought to try hot steam. I know it’s
a pain to set up for it but in relation to the
cost of wood you’re going to ruin using the
fabric softener, it’s not that costly.

I’ve tried bending with fabric softener. I think
it works ok for 1/4” strips and things like that.
In guitar side and binding bending (ebony, ugh),
if you get the wood too wet by soaking or
over-soaking the lignin bonds weaken between
the wood fibers and the outsides of the bend
can blow out. Bending on an iron is only for
very thin wood anyway, but I’m a spritz-it-with-
water guy.

In terms of bending furniture-thickness stock
like chair parts, I bend with a back strap with
the wood steaming-hot from the box. I think
there’s only about 2 minutes of pliability even
with the wood well steamed.

For the modest bend like those chair arms I
think it can be done without a strap, using
wedges to bend the sides over a form with
a sturdy box built around it to pound the
wedges into. I haven’t actually done this
method, it was suggested by Shipwright
when I made a post about my travails trying
to bend a 9” wide single-board chair back.

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RipFence

67 posts in 2526 days


#6 posted 07-05-2017 10:38 PM

Sorry I didn’t include all the details but I am in fact steaming.
In the pieces that got checking, I soaked for two weeks then steamed for ~1 hour/inch.
When I have steamed without soaking I get very little bend, at least with the forms I’m using. I could make a smaller radius form to allow for more spring back but I really don’t think it would get me much more bend.
I have been doing clamps and I think I get it bent in ~2min. Haven’t tried wedges yet.
Any other tips?


You really ought to try hot steam.

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Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#7 posted 07-05-2017 10:47 PM

Oversteaming is not a major issue in my
experience. I would be comfortable steaming
1” stock for well over an hour just to make
sure it’s going to bend.

The best way to bend is with a strap because
it forces the cells in the inside of the bend
to collapse. It can cause a little distortion
and kinking in the surface on the inside but
that’s usually not the show face so it can
be worked around in many cases. With a
strap, I get very little spring-back on 3/4”
thick stock. Moving up to 1” stock takes a
good deal more muscle. I think the wood
springs back less as the bend radius gets
tighter… so shallow radius bends spring
back but my 8” radius chair frame bends
spring back so little I can ignore it and
use joinery to hold the shape.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1309 posts in 1768 days


#8 posted 07-06-2017 02:00 AM

I have a few pieces in my garage. I’m down here in Texas. I cut up a huge windfall burr oak in February of last year. It was my first milling job with my chainsaw, but I got a decent yield considering I was a milling rookie. I have used about half of it, but still have some boards left over. They are all quartersawn or at least rift sawn. They air dried in my garage stickered. Most of the ones I have milled really turned out nice, with just minor expected checking at the ends. I’d be happy to shoot you some pictures of the stuff I have milled so you can see what it looks like.

If you are interested, PM me and let me know. I have maybe (6) or (8) 4/4 pieces, and (2) each 12/4 and 8/4.

I’ve only shipped stuff like this for work, but I suppose we could figure it out.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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