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Questions from an infill newbie

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Forum topic by mmcc73 posted 07-03-2017 07:09 PM 1065 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mmcc73

29 posts in 467 days


07-03-2017 07:09 PM

I acquired a couple of infill planes today. I’ve never owned much less used infills, and have a couple of basic questions.

So here they are (plus a panel marking gauge that I also got today – included because it is pretty)
http://imgur.com/a/mYiqk

I’m not seeing any marker’s marks on either one. The smoother is missing its iron, the shoulder plane is missing its wedge. Smoother is about 9” long, shoulder plan about 8” long and 1 3/8” wide.

On to the questions…
- Is it possible to determine who made these things?
- Are they particularly valuable? Assuming not I’d like to get them into usable condition.
- As you can see in the pictures, the tote on the smoother has come loose. Can I just epoxy it back in, or is there a more preferred method?
- Are there any sources for replacement irons for the smoother? I assume it would be used bevel up?
- For the shoulder plane, are there any patterns around for the wedge so I can make a replacement?

Thanks,
Clark


7 replies so far

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Don W

18523 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 07-10-2017 12:05 PM

Those are pretty nice. They do have some value, but using them wouldn’t hurt that value.

I’m going to guess these (and it’s just a guess) are Craftsman made. I haven’t seen any like the smoother before.

I’d want to see better pictures before I answered the epoxy question.

The smoother looks like a low angle(although it could be the picture) so it may be bevel down.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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mmcc73

29 posts in 467 days


#2 posted 07-12-2017 07:39 PM

I’ll get some additional pictures of the smoother showing the knob and the bedding angle.

Would you think the shoulder plane is also craftsman made? It seems a little more refined than the smoothing plane.

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Don W

18523 posts in 2407 days


#3 posted 07-12-2017 11:30 PM

It could be, but typically you’ll find a Makers mark on manufactured plane.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#4 posted 07-12-2017 11:43 PM

I’ll suggest the infill may have had the infill
replaced by a craftsman. The bed angle
is not shallow enough for a miter trimming
plane and quite shallow for a bevel-down
plane, so its intent is a quandary.

The shoulder plane is a common pattern
and I would guess factory made.

In terms of making a wedge, get a thin
stick of soft wood, cut the end to the rough
angle and stick it in the hole. The wood
will bruise where it jams and you can work
the angle on coarse sandpaper to figure
out what the exact taper you need to
make a wedge is.

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mmcc73

29 posts in 467 days


#5 posted 07-13-2017 11:30 PM



In terms of making a wedge, get a thin
stick of soft wood, cut the end to the rough
angle and stick it in the hole. The wood
will bruise where it jams and you can work
the angle on coarse sandpaper to figure
out what the exact taper you need to
make a wedge is.

- Loren

Great method – thanks!

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mmcc73

29 posts in 467 days


#6 posted 07-13-2017 11:34 PM

Here are some more pictures of the smoother:

http://imgur.com/a/Ge1l2

The bedding angle seems to be 30 degrees. The angle of the infill seems to mesh up with the angle of the casting.

There are some pictures there of the knob as well. The main part of the knob seems to be made of rosewood, but there is some softwood tacked to the bottom – presumably a repair of some sort.

Does this help tell us what sort of plane this is?

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Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#7 posted 07-13-2017 11:48 PM

With a bed angle of 30 degrees it’s in-between
the normal angles of bevel-up and bevel-down
planes. With the bevel up it becomes a high-angle
plane for difficult woods. The lowest angle
I can recall seeing a bevel-down plane would
be about 40 degrees.

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