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How to finish all 4 sides of work pieces?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 07-02-2017 06:39 PM 947 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


07-02-2017 06:39 PM

How does one finish (shellac, stain, poly spray) all 4 sides of a piece in one setting? I’ve done window jambs & casings but didn’t have to worry about the underside so they laid flat while I worked on them. I have 16 28” long stiles & 16 10” rails plus the 50 or so 10” shutter louvers to work on by end of the week.
Was thinking of constructing an adjustable frame holding jig of sorts since I have 9 more different sized windows to do this year. Or… assemble the frame and louvers and simply finish after assembly?

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter


14 replies so far

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jonah

1446 posts in 3133 days


#1 posted 07-02-2017 07:25 PM

If the item isn’t that heavy, you can use painter’s pyramids. They’re little plastic triangles that hold the workpiece on a point so they don’t interfere with the finish. Even given that, it’s best to finish the less-seen side first and then flip the piece over and finish the main side facing up.

Heavier work pieces will leave little indentations from the point of the pyramids and thus should be finished in two stages.

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#2 posted 07-02-2017 08:05 PM

When I did our oak stairway (2 houses ago) I had 108 balusters to finish. I took a pair of saw horses and screwed an A frame onto the top of them. The A Frame had a series of finishing nails that allowed me to put a screw into each end of a blauster and then set it spanning the 2 horses resting on those nails. The screws worked out a little better because the screwheads kept them from sliding sideways and off one nail….falling to the floor.I could rotate the balusters to spray them, and left them there to dry. I think the A frames were big enough to hold maybe 16-20 or so balusters.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


#3 posted 07-02-2017 09:26 PM

Jonah…I would need 200-300 painter’s pyramids :)
Fred…I like that. I can do that for the louvers, and rails. But not the stiles.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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wseand

2796 posts in 2876 days


#4 posted 07-03-2017 02:53 AM

I just lay mine flat and do one side at a time. I would find yourself a sprayer it will save you time and headache. The sides will be fine. Just put some light coats on and sand in between. I always throw a coat or two of oil on first. Tung, Danish, Teak whichever floats your boat.

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ChefHDAN

992 posts in 2684 days


#5 posted 07-03-2017 12:35 PM

I would go with Fred’s recommendation or hang them. I sometimes will hang parts from the structure of my opened garage door to spray.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2810 days


#6 posted 07-03-2017 01:54 PM

I’ve recently shot 1/2” finish nails through strips of 1/4” plywood because I didn’t have enough little pyramids. It worked decently.

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splintergroup

1690 posts in 1057 days


#7 posted 07-03-2017 02:00 PM

I always hang bigger items, two screw eyes in the top edge and then spray.

If brushing I typically do a single side at a time, laying flat with screws driven through a board to raise it up.

Your project will take time finishing (consider how long it took to build 8^)

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#8 posted 07-03-2017 02:18 PM

Maybe for the stiles just put a screw eye into the bottom end and hang?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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rwyoung

409 posts in 3306 days


#9 posted 07-05-2017 03:56 PM

Did a bunch of trim for a friend doing a house flip. Used cheap sawhorses on the driveway and each one had a carpet tack strip duct taped across the beam. Held up the trim so I could make sure and hit the top and bottom edges without it leaving funny marks because of pooling.

I’ve also used the carpet tack strips when dealing with a bunch of small parts that needed finishing pre-assembly.

Worked well and the strips are cheap and for me quicker than making a bunch of nail boards.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#10 posted 07-05-2017 07:04 PM

Holbs, did you fashion a plan yet?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


#11 posted 07-06-2017 12:20 AM

Folks who use nail board or tack strips… does that not leave indentations underneath? Or maybe the pieces are so light and the number of nails negate any said effect from gravity. I assume, the bottom has to be dry, not freshly applied.
Fred…no plan yet. Still leaning towards the really simple idea of driving a finishing nail or something light into the stile meets rail area and hanging as I have… 16 stiles, 16 rails, 56 louvers to hang :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2810 days


#12 posted 07-06-2017 01:10 AM

I used nail boards for drawers fronts so pretty light and most of back side covered by drawer box.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

635 posts in 1374 days


#13 posted 07-06-2017 01:26 AM

If you’re spraying and using euro hinges, many woodworking stores (maybe even big box) have something you can put into the hinge hole to hang your piece (of course fully assembled) and spray everything at once.

something like below. probably something you could make from a wire hanger.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,190,43034&p=70733

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rwyoung

409 posts in 3306 days


#14 posted 07-06-2017 12:42 PM



Folks who use nail board or tack strips… does that not leave indentations underneath? Or maybe the pieces are so light and the number of nails negate any said effect from gravity. I assume, the bottom has to be dry, not freshly applied.
Fred…no plan yet. Still leaning towards the really simple idea of driving a finishing nail or something light into the stile meets rail area and hanging as I have… 16 stiles, 16 rails, 56 louvers to hang :)

- Holbs

The Painter’s Pyramids have caused marks on a few things I’ve done. However the nail boards haven’t. In the case of the PPs, entire weight of item spread out on four blunt points. Nail boards, many more points (although since the tips aren’t perfectly coplanar, how many are actually supporting things is in question) and generally smaller so harder to see any sort of “damage”.

But finding said marks is usually difficult and requires close inspection. Closer than somebody would normally look (6 inches : 6 feet rule is in play here)

For me, even though I do use nail boards and they generally work, is that I’ll somehow manage to bump something and slide it across the nail board.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

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