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Forum topic by Karda posted 07-02-2017 02:30 AM 847 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


07-02-2017 02:30 AM

Hi, I am looking a a Craftsman 18” electric chainsaw 4HP. My question is does it have the guts to cut of logs for turning. from what I have done it tape more power to rip a log than cross cut. I don’t want to get the saw and not have it do the job. Thanks Mike


28 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1558 days


#1 posted 07-02-2017 02:44 AM

A little light branch trimming is all that consumer grade electric chainsaws are designed to handle regardless of how far the power claims are inflated beyond what can be produced with only 120V at 15 amps. I have a Milwaukee that I use for light work inside my shop and it works perfect for that.

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MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#2 posted 07-02-2017 03:33 AM

from what I have done it tape more power to rip a log than cross cut.

Chainsaws blades are designed for cross-cutting across the grain, not ripping with the grain. While it can be done, because of the improper cutter geometry, it will take forever and a day. A very angled rip will be a bit faster than a perpendicular cut though, but still painfully slow. Cross cut blades are typically ground to 25°-35°, while ripping ones should be ground to 10°-15°.

Whatever saw you get, pick up a properly sized sharpening file along with it. A sharp blade is a requirement, regardless of power.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: IMO, for cutting blanks for turning, particularly for the lathe you have, 14” is all that would be needed… anything bigger would just be a waste of blade.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#3 posted 07-02-2017 03:42 AM

You are wanting to cut turning blocks out of logs. I do a lot of that myself, I use a 14” electric chain saw that I got at harbor freight.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

400 posts in 277 days


#4 posted 07-02-2017 03:50 AM

I’ve got a Poulan Pro electric 18” bar, 4 HP. I wouldn’t sell it short. It’s a bit of a beast. When it has a sharp chain it will cut amazingly well. If the Craftsman is anything like the Poulan, it should be a good saw. Never tried to do a rip cut with it however.

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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 179 days


#5 posted 07-02-2017 03:59 AM

I have a Stihl MS260 Pro that I have had for about 15 years. Its a beast and goes through nasty old mesquite like butter with a sharp chain. That said, as mentioned above, its more difficult to rip and from what I have seen they don’t make ripping chains smaller than 18” (mines 16”)I’ve split logs with an Alaskan sled before. Its tough but doable.

That said, a sturdy electric is all you may need for shaping and getting things round. A good band saw with a resaw set up is a great thing to have. My old delta 14” with riser is beat to heck and needs to be worked on though.

-- Fear is a Liar

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 07-02-2017 04:06 AM

I know ripping is hard I did my walnut with a 16” electric a worn out one but I got the job done. I won’t be doing this for a living just once in a while for turning wood thanks for you suggestions Mike

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LeeMills

459 posts in 1138 days


#7 posted 07-02-2017 03:13 PM

Just to emphasize what bigblock said… “power claims are inflated beyond what can be produced with only 120V at 15 amps”
Rant: There is no way to produce 4 HP on 120V 15amp. The specs I saw was 110V and 13 amp; may not be the same saw. http://www.sears.com/craftsman-18inch-4hp-electric-chain-saw/p-07134118000P#
Sears is notorious for this as well as changing parts which only they carry at inflated prices. I had a Craftsmans gas and chains were $40 because they changed the sprocket and a standard chain would not fit. I finally had a shop change the sprocket for $20 to accept a normal chain.
Accepted standard definition: 1 HP = 746 watts. Volts X Amps = Watts
At the very best the saw I linked to would be 1.9 HP but that is very unlikely. DC motors are typically 80-90% effective and AC motors are 60-70% effective. This saw is probably about 1.33 HP. That doesn’t mean if won’t do the job, just not as advertised. Sears also off a 6.5 HP shop vac which runs on 12 amp/110V. Yea right!
Rant over.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Spinzwood

13 posts in 210 days


#8 posted 07-02-2017 03:52 PM

I think my Sears is made by Poulan. I don’t see any way to adjust the amount of chain oil it puts out.. which is tremendous. Eats oil faster than wood :)

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#9 posted 07-02-2017 05:14 PM

thanks lee for the power break down now I know what I am getting into, I don’t realy trust specs they a can say what they want. I would rather talk to somebody who has no interest in selling to me and know what they are taliking about

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

154 posts in 224 days


#10 posted 07-02-2017 05:33 PM

Let’s just say some modern HP claims are a bit “optimistic”.

I decided to go with a gas saw so I could take it with me easily. I just bought a small refurbished one off Ebay and am totally happy with it. So far I’ve ripped up to about 8” diameter oak without any undue issues. It’s not set up to rip but will. The right chain and sharpening would help but so far it hasn’t been necessary.
Here’s the one I bought. Being refurbished there might be some variation in cosmetics. Mine looked like it was used maybe once if that.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Poulan-Pro-18-Inch-42CC-2-Cycle-Gas-Chainsaw-Certified-Refurbished-PP4218A/121456646831?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9628 posts in 3485 days


#11 posted 07-02-2017 05:40 PM

I haven’t owned an electric but in running
a gas saw, I found that frequent sharpening
is the key to getting fast and accurate cuts.

The chain really gets dull faster than you
might expect. You can get sharpening jigs
but it’s pretty easy to do it with just a little
round file with a little practice.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#12 posted 07-02-2017 05:47 PM

Guys, the HP ratings are different for different types of motors. You say there is no way to get 4hp out of 120v,15amp service and you are always slamming companies for their claims. At the same time everyone of us buy routers like the 7518 PC that claim 3 1/2 hp in a little handheld motor, and nobody is slamming them for their HP claims. There are different types of motors and their ratings are figured in different ways. Here is an 18” SunJoe for $60 with free shipping. We have a SunJoe electric lawn mower that works really well! http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sun-Joe-SWJ701E-18-Inch-14-Amp-Electric-Chain-Saw/252947037765?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D45041%26meid%3D9eb43a4127074a688707d374f5033053%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D121456646831

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

400 posts in 277 days


#13 posted 07-02-2017 07:36 PM

I haven’t had that with the poulan. Can’t help ya there. I don’t believe there is an adj on the poulan either.


I think my Sears is made by Poulan. I don t see any way to adjust the amount of chain oil it puts out.. which is tremendous. Eats oil faster than wood :)

- Spinzwood


View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9628 posts in 3485 days


#14 posted 07-02-2017 07:43 PM

The excessive oil sounds like it’s messed-up.
I’ve had a few chain saws and not had that
problem, though they are a bit greasy there
shouldn’t be oil flying off the chain.

You might take it to a repair shop and see
if there’s a fix.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

686 posts in 653 days


#15 posted 07-02-2017 08:07 PM

I never mention the advertised horsepower of a router, shop vac, or any other wildly overrated electrical device without calling out the manufacturer for gross exaggeration. They rate these devices in a locked rotor condition which will, of course, burn the unit up in a matter seconds. The now defunct Sears Craftsman brand is notorious for telling these lies. I think it is important to let uneducated consumers know the truth.

If someone wants to compare the output of similar devices he should look at the full load amp ratings, and ignore horsepower. That will tell a more accurate story.

I use an Echo 16 inch, 34cc chain saw quite regularly to fell and cut up trees and I also use a cheapo Homelite 9 amp electric chain saw. I have compared them side by side. The electric is a lot slower than the gas saw and isn’t suitable for cutting up big trees. On the other hand, if I am around the house and need to cut up some fire wood, I will typically use the electric saw just because it is lighter and quieter. Those things are often more important to me than speed.


Guys, the HP ratings are different for different types of motors. You say there is no way to get 4hp out of 120v,15amp service and you are always slamming companies for their claims. At the same time everyone of us buy routers like the 7518 PC that claim 3 1/2 hp in a little handheld motor, and nobody is slamming them for their HP claims. There are different types of motors and their ratings are figured in different ways. Here is an 18” SunJoe for $60 with free shipping. We have a SunJoe electric lawn mower that works really well! http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sun-Joe-SWJ701E-18-Inch-14-Amp-Electric-Chain-Saw/252947037765?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D45041%26meid%3D9eb43a4127074a688707d374f5033053%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D121456646831

- papadan


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