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Forum topic by JCamp posted 06-29-2017 04:44 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


06-29-2017 04:44 PM

I’m finially gonna get a few hours of shop time over the weekend and the first of the week. I’m wanting to build something but don’t really need anything. I got bunch of red oak that needs use. I got a little soft maple An pine too. Any ideas on what I should build?
I’ve thought of a clock (not a big fan) a tool tote or tool box and a longbow(red oak doesn’t seem ideal tho)
Any ideas would help. Thanks

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might


18 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3722 posts in 2104 days


#1 posted 06-29-2017 04:54 PM

Do something for yourself..

Some of the ideas that you have had and always put-off.

The red oak will make a very nice dresser caddy!

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

373 posts in 426 days


#2 posted 06-29-2017 04:58 PM

Surely you have a good tool that needs a nice box?

M

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3657 posts in 2147 days


#3 posted 06-29-2017 05:08 PM

Build something for your shop. Maybe a jig or some kind of organizer. Something that make your more efficient so when you do need something your ready.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1200 posts in 420 days


#4 posted 06-30-2017 12:16 PM

I like red oak for handles, but it wouldn’t make a very good longbow. Tool Tote or tool box sounds better. Got anything in the shop that needs organizing? One of my next projects is going to be a chisel till to hold the dozen chisels I have that really need a home better than a beat-up canvas tool roll.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#5 posted 06-30-2017 12:20 PM

All good advice guys. I think I’ll build a end table. Currently we only hav one that’s very cheaply built. We are planning on moving on a couple months to a house that’s a bit bigger and we will need two or three end tables and a coffee table there. I’ll just get a head start on it. Always wanted to build one any.
In my mind I’m think plywood and pine bottom painted white. The top will b red oak. All my boards are 6in wide tho an ill need to make the table top at least 18in wide. Any advise on how to join the boards together other than just glueing them?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14857 posts in 2456 days


#6 posted 06-30-2017 12:43 PM

‘Other than just gluing’ – is there a concern the glued joint isn’t strong enough for a table top? Otherwise, alignment can be improved during glue up with dowels or biscuits.

End table project sounds like a great project to accomplish in a few hours. The one I built took weeks. :-) But then I never said speed was a thing in my shop. lol

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 758 days


#7 posted 06-30-2017 02:06 PM

JCamp,

I would tend to glue-up the top. But if you wish to avoid glue, butt, tongue and groove, or lap jointed edges could be used where the top is held together with battens.

The other idea would be to joint the table top edges with sliding dovetail joints. A long sliding dovetail joint could be difficult to assemble but if you could get the joints together, perhaps battens could be avoided. But I suspect that some structure under the table top would be required to support the top. A small dab of glue at one or both ends in each joint may be required to keep the ends of the table top planks aligned.

Whatever glueless method you might choose, adding a very slight chamfer to the long edges of each plank at the joint lines would hide any slight unevenness that might exist in the table top surface.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#8 posted 06-30-2017 03:45 PM

I was more worried that it would separate over time with use if it was only glued
“adding a very slight chamfer to the long edges of each plank at the joint lines would hide any slight unevenness that might exist in the table top surface.” I really lik this idea

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14857 posts in 2456 days


#9 posted 06-30-2017 04:36 PM

A long grain glue joint, if done properly, is stronger than the wood surrounding it.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

203 posts in 353 days


#10 posted 06-30-2017 06:21 PM

yes, titebond 2 or 3 on a good edge and you can break the board after and it will not break on that glue line

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

686 posts in 654 days


#11 posted 06-30-2017 09:40 PM

Every beginning woodworker should buy a small piece of 1 X 4, cut it in half, joint the edges and then glue the two pieces together to make a board twice as wide. Use any of the Tite Bond products and clamp it up firmly. Let the glue cure for a day or two and then get a claw hammer and try to split the glue joint by vigorous hammering. Chances are overwhelming that a split will appear somewhere else besides the glue joint. After doing that, the new woodworker will never have a question about the strength of wood glue again.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#12 posted 06-30-2017 11:59 PM

I use titebond 2 I just didn’t know how it would hold up after a few years I’ve only used it a handful of times and never on anything that takes the abuse of a end table with water spillage An such

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 758 days


#13 posted 07-01-2017 03:14 AM

JCamp,

My earlier projects from the late 1980s and 1990s and up to this time are mostly glued with Elmer’s Carpenters Glue (yellow PVA glue). These projects remain in service with no signs of glue failure. I attribute the two glue-line failures I have experienced to improper gluing procedures, most likely trying to push the glue’s open time a little too far. If the glue is used according the manufacturer’s instructions and the joints are tight fitting, PVA glues will last a long time. The many other glue-ups remain solid.

Non-water resistant glue will stand up to incidental spills on a surface that has a protective finish, like the end tables you are planning to build. Most heavy spills are wiped up fairly quickly and not allowed to set for very long. An unseen drop or two of liquid will likely evaporate before the glue softens and looses its grip.

But if you remain concerned about the effects of spills on PVA glue, then a water resistant glue like Titebond III could be used. Titebond III continues to hold lap and other joints on a picket fence in my back yard without any signs of failure; in service for at least 6 years in Ohio.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#14 posted 07-01-2017 02:38 PM

JBrow- that’s what I needed. I think my oldest glued project is about a year or so old so I didn’t know how it held up long term
Thanks for the info guys

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#15 posted 07-01-2017 09:12 PM

One final question. The red oak I’m using is reclaimed. It was a deck for mayb 4 years or so before I replaced it. The boards I’m using have been in my building for 5-6months. Do I need to treat them with something before I bring them in just in case there’s some sort or bug in them?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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