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Forum topic by wseand posted 1352 days ago 808 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wseand

2124 posts in 1674 days


1352 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question maple bloodwood floating table top

This table is for my daughter she needs a table for homework and she is getting into drawing and painting. So now I need some help since the table has taken on a dual purpose. What I am looking for is an idea or hardware that would make the top be able to lift up like an easel/drafting table. I am also looking for it to be a floating top. I have made the top already it is 25” x 47” and is made from PC maple and Bloodwood. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

I would prefer to make the lifting mechanism. I have never made a floating table top so any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy


6 replies so far

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Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1483 days


#1 posted 1352 days ago

Achingly beautiful, wseand. It looks like a lovely gift package that will hold its ribbon forever.

As for hardware, one of the LJ major advertisers has two options, both of which I’ve used:

This one is very clean; however, the angles are predetermined.

This other one is infinitely adjustable but at your dimensions you’d need two and they’d need to be adjusted identically. (Note—this is actually made for casement windows, but has been adapted successfully to drafting tables. Fascinating. Yawn.)

It is nice to be able to find these hardware solutions so easily from the Rockler folks.

I assume you appreciate that you’ll need a pencil rail of some kind for this table. Also a drawer, better two, would be appropriate for the applications you’re designing to.

I don’t know what you mean by “floating table top.” Can you expand on that?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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wseand

2124 posts in 1674 days


#2 posted 1352 days ago

Thanks Lee, those both would work out perfect. Yeah I know I need a pencil rail not sure how to incorporate that in and make it removable. A floating table top looks like it is floating above the aprons if that makes sence.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1483 days


#3 posted 1352 days ago

Got it—my next project has just that—and it’s not completely designed, just rolling about in my head.

So you will have legs and apron and then, inset from that, another apron-like frame set in from the edge enough to help it disappear. Might be good if that were painted black too.

This is cool. So if you hinge from that inset box, we must be sure when the top is lifted, the lower part doesn’t hit the real apron. This will drive the height of the inside apron and its closeness to the outside dimensions of the outer apron.

I guess you wouldn’t need a whole box inside, but it would help strengthen the apron-leg frame because there is no top attached to it.

A common pencil rail is thin metal or wood with two L-shaped holes in it, attached via two looseish screws. Easy deal.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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wseand

2124 posts in 1674 days


#4 posted 1352 days ago

I was thinking about two cross pieces from front to back to attach the top to. I was thinking to make them a bit taller than you would think and than put an arch in them to push back the exposure. I am hoping this will give a little more height for lift and still allowing for the floating look.

Also the top of the legs would be lower then the top of the aprons so I would use the same arch to lift the aprons a bit proud of the legs. I would put in a little over sized corner braces to help strengthen the legs/apron.

I am not sure it all sounds better in my head than I can explain it.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 1352 days ago

That all makes sense to me, Bill—I think you’ve got it all scoped out. I like the scalloped ideas both places—it adds some style.

I can’t resist one wacky idea that keeps landing in my head: Assuming the legs are maple, a single bloodwood leg on the corner farthest from the intersection of the top inlays.

OK, I said it, you don’t even need to honor it with a comment! : )

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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wseand

2124 posts in 1674 days


#6 posted 1352 days ago

That isn’t all that wacky, I do like the idea actually. I was also thinking of capping the legs with Bloodwood and either rounding them or pyramid design. Maybe make that back one out of Bloodwood and capping with Maple.

This is why I posted this, I am trying to get some ideas. I have done a lot of searching around for pics and really trying to narrow down the final design.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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