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Forum topic by Jack Colliflower posted 06-28-2017 01:39 PM 930 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


06-28-2017 01:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router wave jig waves jig milling shaping

Hey, fellas!
I’m back with a new idea…and I’d like your opinions!
I don’t come on very often, and when I do, it’s usually to get your take on things. I like to get the opinions of the pros (because Goodness know I’m not one :).
First, a quick intro: Jack Colliflower. I make ZCIs for table saws and miter saws (in the wood working world), and I work on different ideas for tools which (I hope) open up capabilities for wood working. (The last was the Tilting, Sliding Route Table).
First, a question: How do you make “waves” in a piece of wood? I searched and searched, and the only decent way I found was by CNC. Now, I am a machinist by trade, so I could make waves via CNC—but what about you? And what if I want to do it “by hand” with a router Nearly impossible. No real way to do it before now.
I’m going to explain my project and attach pics of the process.
Nothing too fancy. Actually, I think pics will explain it all. And I’ve written up a document which is now a PDF which I’ll attempt to attach.
I am very excited about this new system! I picture all different exotic woods with a wave to pop out the grain, cabinet doors and sides, book shelves, cutting boards…and on and on. I’m really happy about this one! Only our imaginations are the limit.
The board you will see is oak, and I did the routing with a normal 1/2” straight-flute bit.
As you see the pics, I’ll say that the whole process took me very little time. From hooking the board up to the jig to finish sanding, maybe 30 mins? Probably more like 20.
Thanks in advance for your opinions, and please ask any questions!
So…I can’t upload the PDF, which means I’ll copy/paste the written description.
BTW: I have submitted for patent on this one! :)

Here begins the copy/paste details of “The Undulator” :)

The Undulator

The Undulator—as a whole—is a device which allows a wood worker to make “waves” (or undulations) in a board with a hand-held router.
It is comprised of one router plate, two slide guides, two slide poles, one router unit lock, and one undulating jig.
The router plate attaches to the router, and it accommodates the two slide poles which slide through it.
The slide guides slide on either side of the undulating jig (connected to either end of the two slide poles), keeping the router within the jig and on a straight path.
The slide poles connect the two slide guides and allow the router/router plate to slide along the poles (and within the jig), in order to move the router to make cuts in different locations.
The router unit lock is simply a hand-tightened set screw which enters through a tapped hole in the router plate and “sets” into the slide pole. This helps to keep the router on a straight path while cutting.
The undulating jig is the centerpiece. The jig can vary in length, width, height, radial wave, wave pitch and wave frequency—all according to the need of the wood worker’s project at hand.

Here is an example of the name of an Undulator unit and the name classification breakdown:
3R-4.796F-0.5”H-6×24
3R: The undulating wave has a 3.0” radius.
4.796F: The wave frequency (distance between wave crests) is 4.796”.
0.5”H: The distance from top of the wave to the bottom of the adjacent wave is 0.5”.
6×24: The jig is 6”x24” in size

There will be a pre-set selection of undulating jigs for purchase. However, if a wood worker needs a jig with specific geometry, he/she can make the order using the name classification system.
If a wood worker wanted jigs of various sizes and wave geometry, all he/she would have to buy are the undulating jigs and router plates—the slide guides and slide poles would stay the same on most jigs.
In essence, here is the concept in a nutshell:
—The wood worker chooses the Undulator jig set that he/she thinks will fit his/her needs. (The correct size and geometry shape.)
—The board is attached to the jig by means of screwing through the jig and into the board.
—The jig and board are then secured to either a table top (by means of screwing through the jig and into the table top) or a “sacrificial board” which is then clamped to a surface.
—The router is attached to the router plate.
—The router unit is placed on the undulating jig.
—The bit depth and placement is set and the lock is engaged.
—A pass is made along the length of the jig.
—The router unit then takes a step over, is re-locked into place, and is ready for another pass.
—Once the board is routed, it is removed from the jig and the two ends are cut off. (The two sections which were screwed into the jig and were not routed.)

http://i1055.photobucket.com/albums/s509/jcolliflower/IMG2222zps8187b28f.jpg!

p://i1055.photobucket.com/albums/s509/jcolliflower/IMG2218zpsd15ef477.jpg!

-- J Colliflower


20 replies so far

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Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#1 posted 06-28-2017 01:41 PM

I doesn’t look like the pics of attaching the board to the jig came through, so here they are….

-- J Colliflower

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

722 posts in 2368 days


#2 posted 06-28-2017 03:13 PM

I love to see the pic’s if you can get them to work? Sounds like an interesting jig.

View Julian's profile

Julian

1239 posts in 2529 days


#3 posted 06-28-2017 03:23 PM

Looks cool. I think it would be helpful to show a finished project that incorporated “wavey” boards.

-- Julian

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#4 posted 06-28-2017 03:28 PM


I love to see the pic s if you can get them to work? Sounds like an interesting jig.

- rustynails


Did the pics not show up? You can email me at jcolliflower373@gmail.com for pics if desired. I took detailed pics of the process.

-- J Colliflower

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Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#5 posted 06-28-2017 03:29 PM



Looks cool. I think it would be helpful to show a finished project that incorporated “wavey” boards.

- Julian


Agreed. I wish I had time to do a project right now! I thought I’d show the potential and let people imagine the possibilities….

-- J Colliflower

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CharlesNeil

2144 posts in 3709 days


#6 posted 06-28-2017 03:31 PM

sweet..

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Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#7 posted 06-28-2017 05:04 PM



sweet..

- CharlesNeil


Thanks!

-- J Colliflower

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

870 posts in 1791 days


#8 posted 06-28-2017 05:13 PM

Interesting idea.

What is the maximum width board that the jig can handle? I think it would be very interesting to be able to do fairly wide pieces twice at ninety degrees. Say, for example a 10” X 10” piece with the “frequency” of the waves such that you get about five valleys. Run the jig both ways and you should get a piece with a grid of humps.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9113 posts in 2131 days


#9 posted 06-28-2017 05:17 PM

That is cool!

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#10 posted 06-28-2017 05:58 PM



Interesting idea.

What is the maximum width board that the jig can handle? I think it would be very interesting to be able to do fairly wide pieces twice at ninety degrees. Say, for example a 10” X 10” piece with the “frequency” of the waves such that you get about five valleys. Run the jig both ways and you should get a piece with a grid of humps.

- Kazooman


Thanks!
The widest jig I’ve made so far is 6”. This jig can route 4.5” (in width) without moving the board. To route a wider area, one must move the board. However, I can also make a wider jig.
My biggest jig so far is 34”x6”. At this size, I can route 31”x4.5” without moving the board.
Your idea of running the jig both ways would be great! A grid of humps would be a very unique look.
I knew you all would come up with some great ideas!
These jigs really open things up.
Other ideas have been for cutting boards: Undulate a board, then rip it into strips, lay on its side and glue!

-- J Colliflower

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#11 posted 06-28-2017 05:58 PM



That is cool!

- Mosquito


Thanks!

-- J Colliflower

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

870 posts in 1791 days


#12 posted 06-28-2017 08:35 PM


Interesting idea.

What is the maximum width board that the jig can handle? I think it would be very interesting to be able to do fairly wide pieces twice at ninety degrees. Say, for example a 10” X 10” piece with the “frequency” of the waves such that you get about five valleys. Run the jig both ways and you should get a piece with a grid of humps.

- Kazooman

Thanks!
The widest jig I ve made so far is 6”. This jig can route 4.5” (in width) without moving the board. To route a wider area, one must move the board. However, I can also make a wider jig.
My biggest jig so far is 34”x6”. At this size, I can route 31”x4.5” without moving the board.
Your idea of running the jig both ways would be great! A grid of humps would be a very unique look.
I knew you all would come up with some great ideas!
These jigs really open things up.
Other ideas have been for cutting boards: Undulate a board, then rip it into strips, lay on its side and glue!

- Jack Colliflower

I know you will be heading to the shop to try the two way pattern soon. Show us the results!

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#13 posted 06-28-2017 09:21 PM

I’ll will get to it eventually :)

-- J Colliflower

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2905 posts in 2096 days


#14 posted 06-28-2017 09:57 PM

Jack, this is a great idea and I really like the look. I will have to think about potential designs to incorporate this look.

-- Art

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

51 posts in 1972 days


#15 posted 06-28-2017 10:18 PM



Jack, this is a great idea and I really like the look. I will have to think about potential designs to incorporate this look.

- AandCstyle

Thank you. Yes, I’m a bit surprised no one has come out with a way to make a wave with a router. But…it’s great to see some minds are getting to work on its application.

-- J Colliflower

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