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Forum topic by OleGrump posted 06-27-2017 03:55 PM 1557 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OleGrump

132 posts in 185 days


06-27-2017 03:55 PM

Recently there was discussion about watching “The New Yankee Workshop”, which was a very good program, and I enjoyed watching it. In this discussion, I brought up a concern about the show, which was that Norm only showed one way of doing things, which was using the myriad and often costly tools in his shop. Naturally, not everyone has access to the latest state of art, digital, macro-adjustable and/or most expensive machinery. (Norm really blew my mind with his radial-arm drill press…...yeah, we ALL have one of those in our garage or basement, right….?)
Do any of y’all remember another woodworking show on PBS. I don’t recall what the title was, but the guy was an instructor at a woodworking school in New York. I really enjoyed that show, because the guy used the same type of equipment commonly found in the sparsest of woodshops, demonstrating and explaining all the steps very well, making sure anyone watching would understand what he was doing. And he did his projects the way Harry Homeowner would do them in his home workshop. It is a shame that program was rather short lived on PBS, because to me, it was one of the better woodworking programs. Nowadays, I see a couple guys in freshly ironed designer shirts, hosting a program in what looks more like a kitchen or an operating room than a woodshop. In any event, I’d like to see PBS rerun the program with the guy from New York. In my mind, it was a very well done series.

-- OleGrump


26 replies so far

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hairy

2587 posts in 3372 days


#1 posted 06-27-2017 05:17 PM

NYW started with a Shopsmith, Craftsman RAS, benchtop router table, similar to most home shops. I think the shop actually belonged to a show producer.

-- My reality check bounced...

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Rich

1987 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 06-27-2017 05:25 PM

I saw something on Facebook that our own Charles Neil did a pilot for a possible PBS show titled Woodworking Past and Present. I’d love to see that one happen.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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CharlesNeil

2145 posts in 3710 days


#3 posted 06-27-2017 05:39 PM

Am meeting the PBS folks in about 20 min.. time will tell . No commitments as of yet
here Is my pilot .. remember I’m old and have a face for radio,, alot to figure out yet.

Edit ..sorry they had me pull it

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Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#4 posted 06-27-2017 05:56 PM

You don’t need a shop full of machines to build furniture.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dwain

479 posts in 3699 days


#5 posted 06-27-2017 05:59 PM

Agreed. One of the things that make woodworking an are is learning to use what you have to do what you need to do. That experience can open you up to new ideas in function that can branch out and improve what you do.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

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OleGrump

132 posts in 185 days


#6 posted 06-28-2017 11:40 AM

I KNEW some of the folks here would understand my comment. Not trying to put down NYW, just saying it got to where it wasn’t geared toward the average person with a small home workshop. I grew up with a grandfather who was a carpenter and cabinet maker for a little over 60 years. (You read that right. He STARTED making grandfather clocks at age 72….) The man’s shop consisted of: A table saw, an edge joiner, a band saw, a spindle shaper, a drill press, a lathe, and an array of hand tools. Furniture made in this shop is still in use three and four generations later.

-- OleGrump

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2815 days


#7 posted 06-28-2017 12:32 PM

While I understand you question/comment, I don’t see how he could’ve shown multiple ways to accomplish a task while trying to fit a whole project into the timeframe of the show. Also, I don’t think the show was really meant to be a full instructional show on building the projects. It was an entertaining interest building show mixed with a little how to.

Also, he would vary how he accomplished similar tasks over different episodes/projects…

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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


#8 posted 06-28-2017 12:47 PM

I remember when Norm first started with Bob Villa. When they used a certain power tool that they didn’t get paid for using, they covered the name of the manufacturer with duct tape. So, though Norm was trained by his father and grandfather, the main focus became being paid for using tools of the trade. Most often those guys and gals watching had no way of affording those same tools, but it was interesting to see what could be accomplished with them once you set enough money aside for them. Norm, once separated from Bob V. did a lot to help and guide weekend woodworkers to get involved with woodworking. The one thing that used to get me was, Norm would go to a Shaker Museum, take measurements and then build something that looked nothing like what he had drawn from the museum. Norm is a good man, and now the shows are all geared toward selling the most expensive and unattainable tools for the family man who wants to work with wood.
There was a show called Wally and Wanda’s workshop, they were hilarious. They used tools like a circular saw that had the cord retaped with electrical tape and extension cords wired together from being accidently cut. Have fun, make some dust.

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Fred Hargis

4769 posts in 2333 days


#9 posted 06-28-2017 01:55 PM

Your question sure has me puzzled, I don’t recall any such show. I’ll be following this to see if someone comes up with the title.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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CharlesNeil

2145 posts in 3710 days


#10 posted 06-28-2017 02:11 PM

I dont recall that show either and I think i have researched all the PBS woodworking shows.
TV is tough, as we proceed into the one we are working on , you learn alot, i have done some TV stuff before , but it does get complicated .. of course the main issue is funding … Sponsors want something in return for their investment,,they want their brands seen.. with Pbs it has always been covered up as best as possible.
Today most of the previous sponsors are just not interested because of the branding issue , but we are workin gthru and around that..
I agree , it has to be kept real .. that has always been the reason i wouldnt do it in the past .. too much script and perfection.. not the real world, in this case things have changed and we have total say .
The difference in our show, if i comes to be is we will do a field trip exploring a piece of furniture , then we will pick out elements that would be considered difficult, then back at the shop we will explore how the old timers would have managed to do it, and how we might do it modern day … NO CNC.. I have a well used and typical shop, nothing big and fancy .. then we will do a segment on finishing.
I chose this format so that we could actually focus on doing something useful instead of just glazing over ..an entire piece .
You have to remember we have an actual air time of 24 min..
Again we are going forward and trying it out but havent commited just yet .. but its interesting to see whats involved .
We are also seeking funding from outside the woodworking world.
Roy Underhill for example is funded by State Farm Insurance ..
still a ways to go.

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Rich

1987 posts in 429 days


#11 posted 06-28-2017 03:03 PM

That sounds like a show I would enjoy watching. What I like about your videos is that you’re sharing practical knowledge based on years of experience. I’m not as interested in cool new ways of doing things as much as I am in ways that just work, and what to avoid so I don’t get bitten in the butt.

Your tongue and groove floor and dividers you did for the hunt board got me past a roadblock on one of my projects. One of the biggest things I took away too was to not be in so much of a hurry to get starting gluing, but to try to think ahead and plan for movement, gravity, etc. Then there’s that satisfaction when I see you do something and say hey, that’s how I do it! :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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CharlesNeil

2145 posts in 3710 days


#12 posted 06-28-2017 03:10 PM

Thanks Rich,
when i came up there was nothing and those who did woodworking wouldn’t tell you nothing , so I learned by trial and error …. error being the dominate teacher LOL

I explained to the Pbs folks , Im not a showman, im a teacher .. and i try to be a practical one , I remember well when i first started and the struggles..
Im a “cut to the chase ” and dont get intimidated and lets move on sort ..
I am the founder of the KISS movement ( Keep It Stupid Simple)

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FreddieMac

65 posts in 188 days


#13 posted 06-28-2017 03:14 PM

Actually, I thought Norm did a good job of showing different techniques to do the same thing across many episodes. For example, he showed how to make mortise and tenon joinery using a drill press and table saw in one episode. Then he did it with a mortise machine and a router. The first couple of seasons of NYW, norm had a sparse setup. A few episodes he was just using a hammer and finish nails, no nailers. It evolved over the years as he got free tools, but basically he used the tools for speed, there was very few things he did that the normal workshop could not do it would just take more time.

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hairy

2587 posts in 3372 days


#14 posted 06-28-2017 03:50 PM

I’d like to see a show that demonstrated a process instead of building a project. Maybe an episode on tablesaw or router usage. Sharpening, layout, joinery, etc.

-- My reality check bounced...

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CharlesNeil

2145 posts in 3710 days


#15 posted 06-28-2017 03:53 PM

hairy.. exactly , you just cant show much in 24 min.. so my thinking is show something in detail i can actually use and apply to any project

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