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Need advise on bread boards ends for built in cutting boards

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Forum topic by JL7 posted 12-10-2010 07:44 PM 3086 views 2 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JL7

8424 posts in 2426 days


12-10-2010 07:44 PM

A friend at work has a fairly standard built-in cutting board in her kitchen cabinets. It is 3/4” material but they glued the breaboard ends solid across the width of the board and the cutting board split down the middle. No surprise here.

I am going to build a new board for her…....

I am looking looking for any tips on making the breadboard ends correctly on such a thin board? Also material choice for the board, I am assuming that good old maple is hard to beat?

Thanks, Jeff

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA


7 replies so far

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3343 days


#1 posted 12-10-2010 08:21 PM

That is a shame that it split. I have done all kinds of naughty cross grain boards and never a problem. I guess I am lucky.

You could do a take-off on a Woodsmith magazine board that has the ends slip into dados. Rowdy and others have done that board style here:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20122

I guess the classic way of doing this is like that design, with oval holes for the outside pins. Only make the ends have a long tenon and be the same thickness as the board.
Steve

Edit: I just looked back at your past projects, and you have already built this board, silly me. And another with breadboard ends. Build it like that.

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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JL7

8424 posts in 2426 days


#2 posted 12-10-2010 08:31 PM

Thanks Steve – I have built these style ends, but never on such a thin panel. I hadn’t really considered using the dado technique – but will definately consider it…..

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3343 days


#3 posted 12-10-2010 10:11 PM

How about building the board sideways? With all the grain going side to side. Maybe looks kind of weird though. I bet it would be strong enough. 3/4 inch is not THAT thin.

And hey Jeff, I grew up just south of Minneapolis; in Northfield. Lived in St. Paul for about 8 years. It’s cold out there.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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JL7

8424 posts in 2426 days


#4 posted 12-10-2010 10:35 PM

Hey Steve – you think building it sideways will prevent it from twisting? I would guess it still will… Or how about an end grain board – I have a bunch of 1-1/4” square maple sticks…....

How do the cabinet folks build these without cracking?

Yes it’s cold, and we have a blizzard on the way for tonight and tommorow…....yippie!

Jeff

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3343 days


#5 posted 12-10-2010 11:16 PM

I assumed that the original board had the grain running in the opposite direction from the breadboard ends. They were glued tight together, could not handle the different expansion properties and cracked.

Anything can warp or twist. Good grain selection can help that a lot. i.e. quarter sawn, or close to it. I thought cracking was the problem.

I was thinking about an endgrain board, but if you glue a breadboard end to it, you get back to the cross grain problem.

My Mom had such a board that you first described in her kitchen. You pulled it out from under the counter top. It lasted forever without cracking. No special techniques used.

Sorry I am not being too much help here,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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JL7

8424 posts in 2426 days


#6 posted 12-10-2010 11:40 PM

Steve – don’t apologize – I appreciate the comments. I still like the dado idea – I have a design in mind – gotta get through the Christmas rush first – then give it a whirl….

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

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JL7

8424 posts in 2426 days


#7 posted 01-21-2011 08:37 AM

I posted the finished product here – Not the ultimate design, but used the floating breadboard ends. This is a good friend and she (and her daughters) cook alot, so will follow up to see how it holds up.

Thanks

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

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