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Table saw injury help

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Forum topic by diverlloyd posted 06-21-2017 01:23 PM 1035 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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diverlloyd

2332 posts in 1694 days


06-21-2017 01:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw injuries injury stats

So I was reading the tablesaw injury study thread http://lumberjocks.com/topics/226193 and with everyone saying the data is incomplete let’s make it more complete. Give us your injuries,how often you use the saw and if it has the guard on it. I will start it off.

Craftsman zip code saw I took the guard off.

5 kick backs 3 due to having a friend want to me “help”in the shop. 1 by a board deciding it wanted to explode into pieces on the saw and 1 due to stressed wood.
0 injuries touching the blade

I’m not sure how we should answer the how often we use the saw should it be once a week or something like that or by number of cuts pre selected time period. Or guide lines then simple answers 20 or less cuts a week would be a few 20 -100 would be average 100 + would be lots. I think number of cuts pre week would make it better and more statistical.

I will add this out of me feeling like a idiot and doing this but my worst injury on the table saw was a cut that could have used stitches but was caused by the metal tape measure on the fence. It had curled up on the end and I ran my hand over it to stick it back down. Instant cut across my finger now I know that those tapes measures are sharp or at least mine is a razor blade if it curls up.


30 replies so far

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

7478 posts in 2637 days


#1 posted 06-21-2017 01:45 PM

I’ve never had an injury on the table saw. I have had a couple of kickbacks, both on my old saw without a riving knife. But I have never had a kickback on my SawStop. I attribute this to a simple fact- I use the safety features. I leave the guard on for most through-cuts. The fact that my guard has a dust collection feature is an incentive to use it, for sure. But when I do take it off, I put on the riving knife. Again, the fact that these changes are fast and easy (they don’t require tools) is a big factor.

People are lazy. Even if we want to be safe, we will take some chances. I bet 75% of woodworkers use their saws without the guards simply because they are too lazy to put them back on. It’s just human nature. If it’s a hassle to swap that guard on and off, they aren’t going to do it. So I always tell people to buy (of make) an aftermarket splitter. That way, they will be safe from kickback (for the most part), which is the biggest cause of table saw injury.

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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diverlloyd

2332 posts in 1694 days


#2 posted 06-21-2017 01:58 PM

My guard is on when doing through rip cuts everything else is done on a sled. So I would say 80% is done on a sled with out the guard. My guard isn’t bad to put on though it just clicks in place and has one knob to tighten it to the back of the saw. As soon as I’m done with rip cuts I take it off but I also use the saw as a assembly table so the guard would need to be off for that also( I put a piece of tempered hard board on it to work off of). I think if people respond it maybe a interesting thread to see what tablesaw has caused more harm. Like the old craftsman saws that had the blade further to the back compared to some of the saws with the blade closer to the front of the saw. I had one of each and was much more comfortable with the blade further to the back of the saw.
Maybe we should change it to injury with guard or without guard or the how often the guard is on. For my kick backs the guard was on.Mine the springs that hold the kick back paws down didn’t put any pressure down. I had to put them on the opposite side of the paws. To make the downward pressure the paws need.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27071 posts in 2175 days


#3 posted 06-21-2017 02:26 PM

The last one of these reports I saw showed how many injuries were to novis users. At that time it was roughly 60%.

Once again, know your tools and follow protocols.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1317 days


#4 posted 06-21-2017 02:36 PM

+1 on what Monte ^ said. The guy who never used a TS is the one most likely to be injured. I know because I was one of them once and the flat spot on the side of my left thumb is a reminder.

I’ve always maintained kickbacks are by far the most common injury, which as Stumpy noted, even a SS will not prevent without the safety features. BTW, of which the most important is between our ears.

I do not use a guard but I do use a splitter. I also cut those unruly looking boards on my BS.

So I think one of the biggest factors is sizing up your lumber and thinking about the cut you’re doing BEFORE you turn the saw on. This comes with experience.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2562 posts in 2719 days


#5 posted 06-21-2017 04:41 PM

I see several patients a year with TS injuries in the ER where I work as a physician; it’s a busy ER; I estimate we see ~60 patients/year with TS related injuries out of the population of 100000 that we service. Every injury I see, I make a point of asking all the details; What was he doing, did he have a blade guard, was there a riving knife or splitter, did he use a push stick?

The majority of the injuries are on middle aged and older men with years of experience. Injuries have ranged from minor cuts to complete amputations. In every single injury I’ve seen, there was some lack of safety issue; no blade guard, no splitter, no push stick etc. Only ever seen one person with an injury from kickback and it was very minor.

Moral of the story; experience doesn’t seem to be a factor in TS safety but 100% of the injuries I’ve seen involve some lack of safety equipment.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

2332 posts in 1694 days


#6 posted 06-21-2017 05:06 PM

Guys your getting away from the subject
List your personal accidents this is to see what accidents have happen to you personally
Complacency would be the cause of most accidents

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

2332 posts in 1694 days


#7 posted 06-21-2017 05:24 PM

Here
0 accidents touching blade
5 kickbacks 4 with guard on
0 hospital visits
1 cut on fence tape(it it really sharp)
I say I make 70 cuts on it a week

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#8 posted 06-21-2017 05:30 PM

I’ve got 2 table saws. My Ridgid is about 17 years old now. I have had 2 kickbacks on that saw, the first was caused by tension in the wood and the second was a helper (wife) not listening when told not to help. No stiches or ER visits on either and guard in place on both occurances. No cuts on that saw. Second saw is 6month old Ryobi. No kick backs and one cut thumb resulting in 11 stiches last week. The blade guard and riving knife are removed from this saw. The knife does not line up with the blade and prevents through cuts because the wood hits the knife, the guard is a very poor design that attaches to the riving knife, can’t have a guard without the knife. That said, the cut I received last week was 100% my own stupidity, you don’t sit in a chair in front of a tablesaw and cut a piece of wood! Depth perception and reach are drastically changed in a sitting position. I know it and was just too stupid to stand up. I will be installing a guard onto the Ryobi saw as soon as I can get one.

View nkawtg's profile

nkawtg

263 posts in 1088 days


#9 posted 06-21-2017 05:33 PM

0 injuries on the saw
2 kickbacks, minor.
1 whacked thumb from a hammer blow.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1175 posts in 1634 days


#10 posted 06-21-2017 05:44 PM

I’ve been hit in the waist twice from kick back.Hard enough to tear my shirt and draw blood.Ive owed two cabinet saws and at least four different job site saws.Right now I just have one tablesaw.No guard on my saw.

I have been cut by a worm drive skill saw.I also have shot a nail and staple through my fingering different jobs.But these tool were in my hands for many hours on a roof under extremely hostile conditions.

-- Aj

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

915 posts in 2788 days


#11 posted 06-21-2017 05:49 PM



I see several patients a year with TS injuries in the ER where I work as a physician; it s a busy ER; I estimate we see ~60 patients/year with TS related injuries out of the population of 100000 that we service. Every injury I see, I make a point of asking all the details; What was he doing, did he have a blade guard, was there a riving knife or splitter, did he use a push stick?

The majority of the injuries are on middle aged and older men with years of experience. Injuries have ranged from minor cuts to complete amputations. In every single injury I ve seen, there was some lack of safety issue; no blade guard, no splitter, no push stick etc. Only ever seen one person with an injury from kickback and it was very minor.

Moral of the story; experience doesn t seem to be a factor in TS safety but 100% of the injuries I ve seen involve some lack of safety equipment.

- Manitario

It may be off topic, but it was interesting and comes from a doc actually treating TS injuries.
Thanks, Doc…good read.

-- Mike

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1317 days


#12 posted 06-21-2017 05:55 PM


I see several patients a year with TS injuries in the ER where I work as a physician; it s a busy ER; I estimate we see ~60 patients/year with TS related injuries out of the population of 100000 that we service. Every injury I see, I make a point of asking all the details; What was he doing, did he have a blade guard, was there a riving knife or splitter, did he use a push stick?

The majority of the injuries are on middle aged and older men with years of experience. Injuries have ranged from minor cuts to complete amputations. In every single injury I ve seen, there was some lack of safety issue; no blade guard, no splitter, no push stick etc. Only ever seen one person with an injury from kickback and it was very minor.

Moral of the story; experience doesn t seem to be a factor in TS safety but 100% of the injuries I ve seen involve some lack of safety equipment.

- Manitario

WADR your statistics will normally be skewed to the worst necessitating an ER visit.

I still maintain kickback injuries (although minor) far outpace flesh to blade injuries.

That’s just my opinion based on personal experience backed up by other ww’ers.

It would be impossible to prove statistically.

Funny thing is, as far as drawing blood, I injury myself more with hand tools than anything!

Bottom line: ww’ing is a dangerous hobby. Injuries will occur.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

565 posts in 1983 days


#13 posted 06-21-2017 06:02 PM

This is pointless!

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

2332 posts in 1694 days


#14 posted 06-21-2017 06:15 PM

How is it pointless we learn from mistakes wether it’s our your someone else’s. we have already learned that help
on the table saw is bad and not using the guard.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#15 posted 06-21-2017 06:18 PM

ScottM, your post was pointless, If one person remembers what I said and it saves them an ER trip, then nothing is pointless!

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