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Rough spots

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Forum topic by sgauvry posted 06-21-2017 01:17 PM 707 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


06-21-2017 01:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

When turning bowls I end up with rough spots. As an example, let’s say my bowl is divided as a clock. Spots at 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock are perfectly smooth and have a very nice patina. But 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock are rough with tear out. This is true both inside and outside the bowls I turn, especially with wood that is green/wet. It seems my seasoned wood does not have this issue.

Tools are sharp. The lathe appears to be turning well. The headstock and spin center does not have any irregular movement and seem to spin true to center.

How can I avoid this situation. Thanks!!


13 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#1 posted 06-21-2017 01:57 PM

You probably can’t and won’t until the wood is dry. You will always get tearout going against the grain at two positions. Coming off the flatgrain and going into the end grain will be smooth, until you pass the pith and start to go against the grain. I hope that makes sense. It does to me, but I’m different than most people….....Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#2 posted 06-21-2017 02:13 PM

Yes! I get it!! Kind of forgot how that works. Thanks!!

View moke's profile

moke

1036 posts in 2616 days


#3 posted 06-21-2017 02:32 PM

Are you turning your bowls to finished thickness or “rough” turning them, let them dry and finish them? I do that mostly…...occasionally if I feel I get a dry blank I’ll go all the way to finish. After they are good and dry they will finish nicely…..
Mike

-- Mike

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Dustin

409 posts in 580 days


#4 posted 06-21-2017 02:46 PM

I’d recommened looking up some videos of turners using a shear (not sure if spelled correctly) scrape. In the green wood I’ve turned, the tearout was bad (as Jerry mentioned). Scraping helped with the tear out on these spots, but it’s much easier after the wood is more throughly dried.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#5 posted 06-21-2017 03:30 PM

Yes, I use a shear to smooth out the surface. That works to some degree. I then take shellac and cover the area. Before it dries completely I sand using a 400 grade paper. Many of the smaller particles fill the voids and I repeat this process 3 or 4 times. It works well to smooth the surface, but the discoloration remains.

I have also tried applying Boiled Linseed Oil prior to using the Shellac. This process brings out the grain beautifully and also darkens the wood some. That has helped to make the darker, rough areas blend better with the rest. Then I apply the Shellac as described above. This process seems to have worked ok. It’s not perfect, but close.

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#6 posted 06-21-2017 03:32 PM



Are you turning your bowls to finished thickness or “rough” turning them, let them dry and finish them? I do that mostly…...occasionally if I feel I get a dry blank I ll go all the way to finish. After they are good and dry they will finish nicely…..
Mike

- moke

Yes, I rough turn then bag them to allow slower drying. Once I am satisfied it is plenty dry, I complete the turning.

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OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#7 posted 06-21-2017 03:52 PM

Sometimes I get the same thing when finishing a dry prev rough turned blank. I shear scrape as much as possible but at times dont see the area until sanding, starting with 220. I go back to 120 or 180 grit until sanded out. Putting shellac or blo on just makes sanding slower. Wetting with dna or naptha will make those areas easier to see and will evaporate more quickly. Sometimes I still miss a rough spot that I find once going to finer grit. It happens. Best to go back to lower grit or try to scrape them out.

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#8 posted 06-21-2017 05:24 PM

Thanks for the tips!

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Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#9 posted 06-22-2017 12:19 AM

Capt Eddie has a good video on this, if you can find it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#10 posted 06-22-2017 09:33 AM

Thanks, Rick!

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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 181 days


#11 posted 06-28-2017 02:42 PM

This is an informative thread for as fundamental and basic as proper drying is, I often struggle with it impatiently and have a constant battle with tear-out. I mostly turn mesquite which is generally pretty forgiving but anytime I changed it up, I run into problems and get frustrated. More then once I’ve thought I could take something down just a little bit more and ended up having a blow out.

I have a fairly large (but not as big as I had planned) mesquite bowl I roughed out Monday evening and as I got deeper into it, realized how saturated it was with moisture despite spending the last 4 months indoors. I’m going to let it sit a while and dry out some. Mesquite really doesn’t warp much from what I’ve seen, at least.

-- Fear is a Liar

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sgauvry

7 posts in 180 days


#12 posted 06-28-2017 02:57 PM

I’d love to turn mesquite sometime. Cooked with it more than a few times! I love the color in mesquite, but it can be very gnarly. Would like to see some pics of your mesquite turnings.

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Thunderhorse

35 posts in 181 days


#13 posted 06-29-2017 02:27 PM



I d love to turn mesquite sometime. Cooked with it more than a few times! I love the color in mesquite, but it can be very gnarly. Would like to see some pics of your mesquite turnings.

- sgauvry

Sure, I’ll dig some up. Its great wood to turn as it doesn’t tend to warp when drying and is pretty dry to begin with. Its HARD but not as bad as some species.

And all the scraps and offcuts get bagged up for BBQ chips….

-- Fear is a Liar

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